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LNCS's Blog

06 Sep

1894-S Dime and 1913 Liberty Head Nickel are valuable

Coins-United States | LNCS

I found the following little information snippet in newspapers from 1936 - 1953. 

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25 Aug

1883 No Cent from the Eliasberg collection

Coins-United States | LNCS

How many collect coins from famous collections? Also have one of the Newman Liberty Nickels.

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23 Aug

Prices - comparing PCGS vs NGC vs CAC vs No CAC

Coins-United States | LNCS

For the past 15 years, I have kept track of prices realized from major auctions for Liberty Head nickels. For fun, I thought I would compare those graded by PCGS and NGC (with and without CAC stickers). I did this for grades MS65, MS66 and MS67. I started the run in 2008 as that was the earliest result that included a CAC sticker.

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15 Aug

Liberty Nickel Reverse Types

Coins-United States | LNCS

Reverse of 1900 Touching AM/Far LeafThe letters A and M in AMERICA touch at the right foot of the A and the left foot of the M. Also the leaf above the left arm of the V is far from the serif of the V. This hub can be found on most 1883's, all 1884 through 1900 and on some 1901's and 1902's.Reverse of 1902 A and M Separate/Near Leaf

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09 Aug

Liberty Nickels and the price of color: The holder, the sticker or the coin?

Coins-United States | LNCS

During the 2014 Heritage ANA auctions, I was watching a particular coin very closely. The coin was a 1906 Liberty Nickel, in an older green holder (large size, not rattler), with a Gold CAC sticker and very pretty color (lot 7286). For me, nicely toned Liberty Nickels are few and far between, so this coin had me interested. Quickly the pre-auction bids went over $2,000. (the coin is listed at $510 in the PCGS price guide, and had previously sold for $578 in 2003).

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05 Aug

The 1913 Liberty Head Nickel

Coins-United States | LNCS

In 1996, numismatic history was made as Jay Parino paid over 1 million dollars for the Eliasberg specimen of the 1913 liberty nickel. This was the first coin to break the million-dollar barrier, with a final hammer price of $1,485,000 after a 10% buyer's fee was added. This amount surpassed the previous record paid, set in 1989, of $990,000 for the Dexter specimen of the 1804 Dollar and the $962,500 paid for the Reed Hawn Specimen of the 1913 Liberty Nickel. The mystery surrounding this coin is that, while there are 5 known specimens, there is no record at the mint of any being produced. Here lies the mystery.

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