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29 Aug 2014

Mack Martin awarded top exhibiting honor at World’s Fair of Money

News | ANA Official Post | springli

Exhibit featuring Reconstruction-era bonds wins Howland Wood Memorial Award

Editor's note: See below for the full list of exhibitors, as well as examples from the Best-in-Show exhibit.

American Numismatic Association member Mack Martin won the Howland Wood Memorial Award for Best-in-Show in numismatic exhibiting at the 2014 Chicago World’s Fair of MoneySM in Rosemont, Illinois. Martin’s exhibit, “Baby Bonds,” featured notes issued in Georgia and Louisiana after the Civil War that were used to fund Reconstruction efforts.

Martin, who previously won best-in-show awards at Central States and Memphis Paper Money Show, said he began collecting Baby Bonds in 1975 .“That started me collecting everything I have ever had a chance to buy,” he said.

For Martin, the fun of collecting Baby Bonds is researching the history behind them through archived records.  Only two states in the South, Georgia and Louisiana, issued Baby Bonds. In Martin’s home state of Georgia, the use of Baby Bonds was short-lived before the Federal Government shut the program down. Georgia Baby Bonds were likely issued for less than a year, and those that were redeemed were destroyed, which makes Georgia bonds exceedingly rare, Martin said.

The Radford Stearns Memorial Award for Excellence in Exhibiting was presented to Thomas J. Uram as first runner-up for “The Historically Significant Two Cent Piece 1864-1872” and Charmy Harker as second runner-up for “Penny Potpourri — A Collection of Penny Creations.” Harker also won the Rodger E. Hershey Memorial People's Choice Award, which is selected by convention attendees, and the Ira & Larry Goldberg Award for the best exhibit of "Coins that Made History."

The Thos. H. Law Award for best exhibit by a first-time exhibitor went to Sunil Richardson for "Ancient South Indian Lead Coins and its Uniqueness in World Numismatics."

The Charles H. Wolfe Sr. Memorial Award for the Young Numismatist Best-of-Show exhibit was presented to Garrett S. Ziss for "The Faces and Stories Behind the Treasury Signers of U.S. Paper Money."

Jeffrey J. Rosinia received the Derek Pobjoy Award for Best Exhibit of Modern Circulating Commemorative Coins for "United States Circulating Commemorative Coins." He also received the Women in Numismatics award for his exhibit "The Unappreciated Susan B. Anthony Dollar: A Historic Coin that 'Gets no Respect.'"

Gene Hynds received the Joseph E. Boling Award for Judging Excellence.

Fifty-six competitive and seven non-competitive exhibits were displayed at the World’s Fair of Money by 38 competitive and six non-competitive exhibitors. 

The American Numismatic Association is a congressionally chartered nonprofit educational organization dedicated to encouraging people to study and collect money and related items. The ANA helps its 25,500 members and the public discover and explore the world of money through its vast array of education and outreach programs, as well as its museum, library, publications, conventions and seminars. For more information, call 719-632-2646 or go to www.money.org.

CONTACT: Jake Sherlock

Telephone: 719-482-9872

E-mail: pr@money.org

Below is a brief sampling of the Baby Bonds in Mack Martin's winning exhibit. Text and photos provided by Mack Martin. 

Georgia Baby Bonds

Informally known as Baby Bonds these certificates were authorized by the Act of December 14, 1878.  These six year 4% bonds had a redemption date of January 1, 1885 and paid interest via six 4% interest coupons which were clipped from the bond annually during its life. The coupons are worth 20 cents and payable yearly by the state treasury office in the cities of Albany, Americus, Athens, Augusta, Columbus, La Grange, Macon, Savannah, and Rome.  Signed by the treasurer John W. Renfroe and the Governor Alfred H. Colquitt. This $5 bond dated January 1st, 1879 has an imprint  American Bank Note Company of New York.  The image of baby Renfroe Jackson is at the left and the state coat of arms is at right, adjacent  to the series of  6 coupons.  These bonds also have a fancy ornate green back as illustrated. 

$50 Georgia Baby Bond

The $10, $20 and $50 are specimens that were to be printed but never were as the US government intervened.The metal plate was used in Grover Criswell's Currency Series Volume II book.  It was luck that this piece was recovered.The treasurer, J. W. Reinforce, went to trial for impeachment for taking money and was found not guilty. He served out the rest of his term as treasurer.Georgia continued to redeem their bonds on into the 1900s.

Louisiana Baby Bond

Right after the Civil War in order to avoid US currency taxes, Louisiana came out with the "Baby Bond." Although it was a bond it was used as currency. A nice vignette of baby in bonnet, these bonds were affectionately called "baby bonds" because of the baby on each bond plus the small denomination of $5 which allowed many individuals to purchase them and help the state of Louisiana during the period of reconstruction after the Civil War. 

Louisiana Baby Bond

A stamped signature of Louis A. Weltz, the Governor of Louisiana who was elected in 1880 but died of tuberculosis just one year later at the age of 38. E.A Burke, Democrat and 'carpetbagger', treasurer of Louisiana, whose stamped signature also appears at the bottom of the bond, stole over $1,500,000 from Louisiana over his ten years in office. After he was indicted for embezzlement of state bonds he lived as a fugitive from justice in Europe and Honduras until his death in 1928 at the age of 88. In the late 19th century, numerous bonds issued in the 1860s and 1870s by Louisiana were surrendered to the state in 1880 to be cancelled in exchange for newly issued bonds. Burke issued the new bonds but never cancelled the old bonds, instead reselling them in the open market and pocketing the money for himself.  On August 2, 1884 the state of Louisiana failed to pay interest on the ‘baby bonds”. About $18000 principal and interest of these bonds is payable out of the collection of back taxes, and there is no money to the credit of this fund now in the hands of the fiscal agent.

2014 ANA EXHIBIT AWARDS

Howland Wood Memorial Award for Best-in-Show: Mack Martin, "Baby Bonds."

Radford Stearns Memorial Award for Excellence in Exhibiting, presented to the first and second runners-up: Thomas J. Uram for "The Historically Significant Two Cent Piece 1864-1872" and Charmy Harker for "Penny Potpourri — A Collection of Penny Creations."

Thos. H. Law Award, for the best exhibit by a first-time exhibitor: Sunil Richardson for "Ancient South Indian Lead Coins and its Uniqueness in World Numismatics."

Charles H. Wolfe Sr. Memorial Award for the YN Best-of-Show exhibit: Garrett S. Ziss for "The Faces and Stories Behind the Treasury Signers of U.S. Paper Money."

Rodger E. Hershey Memorial People's Choice Award, selected by convention attendees: Charmy Harker for "Penny Potpourri."

Derek Pobjoy Award for Best Exhibit of Modern Circulating Commemorative Coins:  Jeffrey J. Rosinia for "United States Circulating  Commemorative Coins."

Women in Numismatics Award: Jeffrey J. Rosinia for "The Unappreciated Susan B. Anthony Dollar: A Historic Coin that 'Gets no Respect.'"

Ira & Larry Goldberg Award, for the best exhibit of "Coins that Made History": Charmy Harker for "Penny Potpourri."

Joseph E. Boling Award, for Judging Excellence: Gene Hynds.


Class 1: United States Coins, Lelan G. Rogers Memorial. All United States coins and patterns and all coinage or trade tokens used in pre-Federal America, except gold.

First place: Thomas J. Uram, for "The Historically Significant Two Cent Piece 1864-1872."

Second place: Andrew Blinkiewicz, for "The Last Decade of Walking Liberty Half Dollars."

Third place: Jeffrey J. Rosinia, for "The Unappreciated Susan B. Anthony Dollar: A Historic Coin that 'Gets no Respect.'"

 

Class 2: United States Fiscal Paper, Sidney W. Smith/William Donlon Memorial. All paper money and bonds issued by the United States government, including military currency; pre-U.S. colonial, Continental, and Confederate paper money and bonds; state and private banknotes and bonds; scrip; college currency; and stock certificates. Essays, proofs, and souvenir cards of such items may also be shown.

First place: Mack Martin, for "Baby Bonds."

Second place: Garrett S. Ziss, for "The Faces and Stories Behind the Treasury Signers of U.S. Paper Money."

Third place: Paul R. Hybert, for "What's in Your Wallet, Uncle Sam?"

 

Class 3: Medals, Orders, Decorations and Badges, Burton Saxton/George Bauer Memorial. Medallic items not used as a medium of exchange, or not having trade value. Orders and decorations, convention badges, and badges issued by fraternal orders or other organizations. Excluded are Masonic pennies and tokens included in classes 5-8.

First place: Darrell E. Luedtke, for "A Complete Collection of Wooden Medals of the 1876 U.S. Centennial."

Second place: Donald H. Dool, for "A Potpourri of Medals."

Third place: Andrew Blinkiewicz, for "Indian Tribal Series Medallions."

 

Class 4: Modern U.S. Coins and Modern Medals, John R. Eshbach Memorial. Coins issued 1960 and later, and medallic (non-denominated) material issued by a private mint of any country after 1960, including philatelic numismatic covers. 

First place: Thomas J. Uram, for "Under the Dome."

Second place: Jeffrey J. Rosinia, for "50 Years of Kennedy Half Dollars."

Third place: Scott A. McGowan, for "Monumental Coins."

                                                                                                                       

Class 5: Tokens, B.P. Wright Memorial. Items, including encased postage, issued unofficially as a medium of exchange for goods and services or for advertising purposes, but excluding American colonial items included in class 1. Includes Masonic pennies and substances used in lieu of metal.  

First place: Darrell E. Luedtke, for "The Origins of the First Wooden Money of the United States."

Second place: Robert Rhue, for "Pedley Ryan Dollars of 1933 - Denver, Colorado."

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class 6: Casino Chips and Gaming Tokens, Archie A. Black Award. Items of all types and materials used as gaming pieces, including traditional and non-traditional tokens and other money substitutes, and including tokens used in military clubs.

First place: no award.

Second place: Brenda M. Black, for "Gaming Tokens of the World's Great Casinos."

Third place: no exhibit

           

Class 7: Engraved Coins, Love Token Society Award. Numismatic items that have been converted into jewelry, amulets, or decorative objects. Examples are love tokens, hobo nickels, and "pop-out" coins.

First place: Charmy Harker, for "Penny Potpourri: a collection of penny creations."

Second place: Judy Schwan, for "An Introduction to Love Tokens."

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class 8: Elongated Coins, Dottie Dow Memorial. Souvenirs created using an elongating machine, whether the underlying piece is a coin, token, medal, or blank planchet.

First place: Cindy Calhoun, for "53 Years of JFK Elongated Coins."

Second place: Robert Fritsch, for "Elongating in Franconia Notch."

Third place: Mack Martin, for "The Elongated Coin Man — Ray Dillard."

 

Class 9: Coins Issued Prior to 1500 A.D., Dr. Charles W. Crowe Memorial. Coins, including gold, issued by any government before 1500 A.D.

First place: Sunil Richardson, for "Ancient South Indian Lead Coins and its Uniqueness in World Numismatics."

Second place: Bruce D. Bartelt, for "From Croesus to Caesar: Coinage from the First Millennium B.C."

Third place: Kathryn S. Freeland, for "Traveling with Hadrian: A Numismatic Journey."

 

Class 10: Regional U.S. Numismatics, William C. Henderson/Fred Cihon Memorial. Numismatic material of any type specific to a particular region of the United States, such as the locale where the exhibit is being presented.

First place: William A. Burd, for "Medals Issued in Gold by the Chicago Coin Club."

Second place: Dennis Schafluetzel, for "City of Chattanooga Notes: Authorized and Fantasy."

Third place: Darrell E. Luedtke, for "Wooden Money from the Great State of Illinois."

 

Class 11: Numismatics of the Americas, Henry Christensen/John Jay Pittman Sr. Memorial. Numismatic material of any type issued or used in the Western Hemisphere outside the United States.

First place: Donald H. Dool, for "Nineteenth Century Latin American Scripophily."

Second place: W. Thomas Corey, for "Silver Cobs of the Major Spanish American Mints."

Third place: Dan Freeland, for "Selected Canadian Victory Loan Bonds."

 

Class 12: Numismatics of Europe, John S. Davenport Memorial. Numismatic material of any type issued or used in Europe, including Russia east to the Urals.

First place: Donald H. Dool, for "AD Dated Copper Coins of the Fifteenth Century."

Second place: Robert Fritsch, for "Four Award Medals by Antoine Bovy."

Third place: Thomas J. Uram, for "The Kings and Queens of England Through Maundy Money."

 

Class 13: Numismatics of Africa and the Middle East, Menachem Chaim and Simcha Tova Mizel Memorial. Numismatic material of any type issued or used on the continent of Africa and in the Middle East (from Turkey east through Iran and south to Aden).

First place: William Myers, for "An Unforeseen Problem with the Ethiopian Coins of 1944."

Second place: Simcha Laib Kuritzky, for "Henrietta Szold and Her Legacy: Hadassah and Youth Aliyah."

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class 14: Numismatics of Asia and the Pacific, William B. Warden Jr. Memorial. All numismatic material issued or used in Asia east of the Urals and Iran, and in the southeast Asian, Australasian, and Pacific islands (excluding Hawaii under the U.S.).

First place: Fred Schwan, for "World War II Trench Art - Southwest Pacific Area."

Second place: no exhibit

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class 15: Gold Coins, Gaston DiBello/Melvin and Leona Kohl Memorial. Gold coins of any provenance and era.

First place: Richard Feely, for "First Thirty Years of Vatican Gold."

Second place: no exhibit

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class 16: Numismatic Errors and Error Varieties, Numismatic Error Collectors Award. Any numismatic material mis-struck or misprinted by the producer, including varieties caused by die or plate deterioration or damage. Items mutilated or altered after production are excluded.

No exhibits this year.

 

Class 17: Numismatic Literature, Aaron Feldman Memorial. Printed and manuscript (published or unpublished) literature dealing with any numismatic subject. 

No exhibits this year.

 

Class 18: General, Specialized, and Topical, Robert Hendershott Memorial. Numismatic material not covered in other classes or covered by more than one class. Includes wooden money, political buttons and insignia, and other exonumia, as well as media of exchange used in carrying out purchases and business transactions by primitive people and later by others as they progressed from barter to coins, or other items generally accepted as primitive or odd and curious currencies. Also includes exhibits showing material linked by design, such as elephants or bridges, or by theme, such as a world’s fair. 

First place: Darrell E. Luedtke, for "The Wonderful World of Wooden Money."

Second place: Tyler Rusnak, for "Stories From the Ground: Tales of the Lost, the Circulated, and the Cherrypicked."

Third place: Scott A. McGowan, for "Silver Coin to Coin Silver."

 

Class 19: Convention Theme, Clifford Mishler Award. Numismatic items of any type that, together with the exhibit text, illustrate the announced theme for the convention at which the exhibit is shown. The 2014 convention theme was: Countries & Currency.

First place: William Myers, for "World War II Foreign Coins From the United States Mint Composed of Shell Casing Metal."

Second place: Simcha Laib Kuritzky, for "Israel & Currency: Her Innovative Approach to the Question of Idolatrous Money."

Third place: Donald H. Dool, for "Copper Coins of Conflict."

 

Class 20: U.S. Commemorative Coinage, Society for U.S. Commemorative Coins Award. Material of any type or period related to United States commemorative coinage and to the events being commemorated.

First place: Jeffrey J. Rosinia, for "United States Circulating  Commemorative Coins."

Second place: no exhibit

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class 21: Emeritus, Barry Stuppler Award. Exhibits by individuals not otherwise eligible to exhibit competitively, or exhibits that have won best-of-show or twice won in class competition at the World's Fair of Money. Any other exhibit may also be entered at the exhibitor's option. The winner of this class does not advance to best-of-show judging.

First place: Brett Irick, for "Canadian Coins of 1947-1948."

Second place: Ralph W. Ross, for "John F. Kennedy."

Third place: no exhibit                                                           

                                                           

2014 ANA YN EXHIBIT AWARDS

Class Y1: United States Coins, Edgerton-Lenker Memorial. All United States coins and patterns and all coinage or trade tokens used in pre-Federal America.

First place: Andrew Blinkiewicz, for "The Last Decade of Walking Liberty Half Dollars."

Second place: no exhibit

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class Y2: World Coins, James L. Betton Memorial. Coins issued 1500 A.D. or later in any foreign country.

No exhibits this year.

 

Class Y3: Paper Money, Kagin Family Award. Paper money and paper numismatica of all types, issued in any country.

First place: Garrett S. Ziss, for "The Faces and Stories Behind the Treasury Signers of U.S. Paper Money."

Second place: no exhibit

Third place: no exhibit

 

Class Y4: Israeli or Judaic, J.J. Van Grover Memorial. Israeli or Judaic numismatic material of all types. In the event no exhibits qualify, the award may be presented to another deserving  exhibit.

First Place: Gavin Burseth, "Celebrating A Century of Honor - Boy Scout Medallions and Coins."

Second Place: no exhibit

Third Place: no exhibit

 

Class Y5: Medals and Tokens, Charles "Cheech" Litman Memorial. Medals and tokens of all countries. In the event no exhibits qualify, the award may be presented to another deserving  exhibit.

First place: Andrew Blinkiewicz, for "Indian Tribal Series Medallions."

Second Place: no exhibit

Third Place: no exhibit

 

Class Y6: Medieval and Ancient, Charles H. Wolfe Sr. Memorial. All numismatic material issued prior to 1500 A.D.

No exhibits this year.

 

Class Y7: Errors and Varieties, Alan Herbert Memorial. Any numismatic material mis-struck or misprinted by the producer, including varieties caused by die or plate deterioration or damage. Items mutilated or altered after production are excluded. In the event no exhibits qualify, the award may be presented to another deserving  exhibit.

First Place: Tyler Rusnak, for "Stories From the Ground: Tales of the Lost, the Circulated, and the Cherrypicked."

Second Place: no exhibit

Third Place: no exhibit

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