The Exchange

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Coins of the Bible

Numerous coins are mentioned throughout the Bible. These coins are key aspects of the lesson of the widow's mite, Jesus' “Render unto Caesar...” speech and the betrayal of Jesus by Judas. Biblical coins are excellent pieces to collect. They are tangible pieces of history from one of the world's most important books.
Written by Will Schrepferman at 00:00

The origins of coinage

In order to find out when and where coins originated, one must look back to Lydia, an Ancient Greek kingdom in Asia Minor, during the seventh century BCE. It is not surprising that the Greeks invented coinage; they were also the creators of democracy, modern philosophy and many other things that influence our culture today. However, without their invention of coinage, our world today may have been very different.
Written by Will Schrepferman at 00:00
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The Coins of Alexander

Alexander the Great, son of Philip II, king of Macedon, was one of the most successful generals in all of history. Undefeated in battle, Alexander spread his empire across Persia, Asia Minor, Egypt and Syria. In conquering these areas, Alexander created Hellenistic culture, blending Asian and European lifestyles. Throughout his empire, the young conqueror issued distinct bronze, silver and gold coins.
Written by Will Schrepferman at 00:00

A History of Rome and Its Coinage

Legend says that the brothers Romulus and Remus founded the city of Rome around 750 BC. At first, the Romans were one of many cities vying for power in central Italy; but, after many battles, Rome emerged as the most dominant of these. By the end of the 4th century BC, Rome controlled most of central Italy; then, after the Pyrrhic War (280-275 BC), in which it defeated the Greek city-states in southern Italy, Rome controlled nearly all of the Italian peninsula.
Written by Will Schrepferman at 12:00

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