Login

31 May 2021

morgan dollar

| user_46126

my morgan dollar is from 1880 its in good condition its probily graded VF (very fine) it was $30 dollars at a coin show how much is it worth.i dont have a picture of it because it wont let me upload it

READ MORE
31 May 2021

this is my collection

| user_46126

i am ten and i have 2 silver half dollars 2 ancient coins 1 morgan silver dollar and 15 mercery dimes and other things worth about $30. and i am ten years old i dont really know how to write a blog so i am practicing making a blog

READ MORE
30 May 2021

super error coin

| user_46126

this coin is unique i found it at a coin show for ten bucks .

READ MORE
30 May 2021

penny error

Odd & Curious Money | user_46126

as you can see this is a 1989 d penny i was wondering if any of you had any idea what this is worth? it is aproxamently 75% off strike with data and mint mark are readable.

READ MORE
27 May 2021

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of World Coins Book Review

| user_15275

The Illustrated Encyclopedia of World Coins by Burton Hobson and Robert Obojski

READ MORE
27 May 2021

Some Recent Acquisitions

| I. R. Bama

Hello everyone, yes, it's your old lost friend, Lazarus, back from, well, it only seems like hell. But I digress.....

READ MORE
27 May 2021

A Little History of U.S. Circulating Coins

| user_28318

The History of U.S. Circulating Coins:

READ MORE
27 May 2021

The Little Talked About History of U.S. Confederate Coinage

| user_28318

When Britain's American colonies declared their independence in 1776, one of the greatest problems facing the Continental Congress was financing the war effort. The supply of refined silver and gold, as well as the raw ore from which these metals were taken, was quite small in the American colonies. The great gold and silver discoveries of the 1800s were still decades away, and the only coining metal available from domestic mines in any reasonable amount was copper. In the initial enthusiasm of 1776, several of the new states made plans for a copper coinage of their own. One state that actually went through with this idea was New Hampshire. In March, its House of Representatives appointed a committee to look into the practicality of minting copper coins. The committee recommended that William Moulton be assigned the task of coining 100 pounds of copper into pieces valued at 108 to the Spanish Milled Dollar. These fascinating coins, of which fewer than ten are known today, display on one side a tree and the inscription AMERICAN LIBERTY. The other side features simply a harp. Oddly, however, there is no mention anywhere on these coins that they were issued by New Hampshire!

READ MORE

Money.org Blog and Forum Terms & Conditions of Use / Disclaimer

This is a community-sourced blog. Any views or opinions represented in this blog are personal and belong solely to the blog post’s author, and do not represent the views or opinions of the American Numismatic Association, and may not represent the views or opinions of people, institutions or organizations that the author may or may not be associated with in professional or personal capacity.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The American Numismatic Association (ANA) makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The ANA does not monitor the blog on a constant basis.

The ANA will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Downloadable Files and Images

Any downloadable file, including but not limited to pdfs, docs, jpegs, pngs, is provided at the user’s own risk. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages resulting from a corrupted or damaged file.

Blog/Forum Posts and Comments

In these terms and conditions, “user content” means material including without limitation text, images, audio material, video material, and audio-visual material that you submit to this website, for whatever purpose.

Blog/forum posts and comments are encouraged. However, the ANA reserves the right to edit or delete any blog/forum posts or comments without notice. User content deemed to fall under the following categories will be removed and may prompt disciplinary actions, including, but not limited to, review and suspension/revocation of blog and forum privileges:

  • User content deemed to be spam or questionable spam.
  • User content intended for commercial purposes or to buy, sell or trade items.
  • User content containing profanity.
  • User content containing language or concepts that could be deemed offensive.
  • User content containing hate speech, credible threats, or direct attacks on an individual or group.

In addition, user content shall not be illegal or unlawful, shall not infringe any third party’s legal rights, and shall not be capable of giving rise to legal action whether against you, the ANA, or a third party under any applicable law.

The ANA may terminate your access to all or any part of the website at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice, effective immediately. If you wish to terminate this Agreement or your Money.org account (if you have one), you may simply discontinue using the website. All provisions of this Agreement which by their nature should survive termination shall survive termination, including, without limitation, ownership provisions, warranty disclaimers, indemnity and limitations of liability.

The ANA reserves the right to display advertisements on your account and blog pages.

This blog’s terms & conditions of use / disclaimer is subject to change at anytime.

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.