Login

31 Aug 2015

Trip to Jordan

Coins | Ian Fenn

Until now I haven't had much to write about since the summer seminar, and to be honest it was just too hot here in Vienna. To escape the heat in Vienna My wife and I fled to the heat in Jordan, (Same temperature just a different environment). I posted a few pictures of our trip on face book. Of course while I was there I did some coin hunting, it wasn't overly successful. I had learnt many years ago the best way to find coins in Jordan was to check the local Jewelers . IN Jordan it is more likely someone will take coins( gold) to their local jeweler than to the gold markets. The problem is with the high gold price over the last few years, more often than not the coins get melted down almost immediately. 10 years ago it wasn't uncommon to pick up interesting pieces for the spot price. Now there is nothing. For silver coins you do have to head to the gold market ( and the silver shops in that markets) 10 years through to four years ago, I used to find boxes of coins to sort through.... but this time the gold price has also had an effect on Silver. The tradition in Jordan is to give the bride presents ( an insurance policy of sorts) usually it was gold, but the gold price until the last few months was such that few of the traditional wedding buyers could afford it. So they purchased silver instead, and where did Jewelers get there silver from? The old coins their customers sold to them. Of course in Jordan like every where in the middle east you can find Counterfeits and replicas. Now that is all is all I could find (fakes). I did buy one replica gold sovereign from a Jeweler I know reasonably well. I was amused to find he had actually made that replica the day before( about 10 days ago now). It is a cast copy produced in 21 Kt gold, as is required by law in Jordan it is Counter-marked( well in this case laser etched). The mark was a new one, a stylized representation of the treasury in Petra, below which is clearly inscribed 21 kt, being new to me I wanted an example. These replicas are not made for tourists or collectors they are made for locals who buy the coins as gold bullion or give them as gifts to family members on important occasions. They are sold only at the current gold value so I only paid the spot price for the coin. To day , back in Vienna, Austria I was just going to put it away and forget about it when I noticed that this replica was cast from a replica, if you look just below the sword on the reverse you can see the faint outline of the counter-mark that would have been on the coin used to create the molds, for this new coin. For me its an amusing find and I thought I would share it here.

READ MORE
31 Aug 2015

Strange change

Coins-World | Joebear

Got a 1932 Canada Penny, and a 1970 1/4 Balboa both in change at a Wal Mart near here. I don't usually shop there but am going back for the change alone! I have also gotten two silver Roosevelt dimes, a 1963 and a 1961, both fair condition, in change and I keep a'lookin!

READ MORE
28 Aug 2015

Sample Slabs

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

A sample slab is created when a third-party grading service changes the image on their slab. They give these slabs to the general public to introduce the new look. Sometimes sample slabs can be collectable, and there are numismatists who specialize in sample slabs.

READ MORE
28 Aug 2015

Discontinued Mints

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

The United States has had multiple mints for making coinage. The ones that are open today are Philadelphia, San Francisco, Denver and West Point. In this article, however, I will focus on the ones that are not open, Charlotte, Dahlonega, New Orleans and Carson City.

READ MORE
28 Aug 2015

The 1964 Peace Dollar

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

The 1964 Peace Dollar is a mysterious coin. 1964 Peace Dollars were minted in an amount of over 300,000 but then were melted due to request by Congress. It is unknown if any survive today. The history of this dollar is confusing and uncertain.

READ MORE
28 Aug 2015

Attendance Announced for 2015 World’s Fair of Money

World's Fair of Money | ANA Official Post | ANAStaff

The American Numismatic Association’s 2015 World’s Fair of Money – the most important numismatic event of the year – regaled 8,635 people at the Donald Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont, Ill, Aug. 11-15.

READ MORE
26 Aug 2015

Coin Descriptions for Blind People

Coins | Tom Babinszki

This month at the World's Fair of Money I introduced a breakthrough project which would make numismatics much more available to blind people.When you cannot see what is on a coin, it is relatively difficult to find this information in a textual or narrative format. In the case of certain coins it is easier, but there is hardly any information out there about less popular coins, and any information mostly exists in local languages.Why is this important? There are coin collectors who are either completely blind or have limited vision and they would like to know more about their coins. While blind people are able to recognize their own currency by touch, there is limited information out there for them to learn about either their own nations' coins, or about foreign coins.When somebody is able to see a coin, detailed information is often not necessary, unless something needs to be described in a cultural or historical context. It makes more sense just to look at the actual coin or a photo.The coin catalogs also contain very little information.Let's look at the example of the Kennedy Half Dollar. By touch, one can tell that there is some kind of a bird on the coin. However, a blind person who is not exposed to two dimensional objects of birds on a regular basis, may have more difficulty recognizing it.Numista contains the following information:"State emblem (eagle with shield), ring of stars"The following description, however, makes a coin more imaginable:In the center is the presidential seal: A bald eagle with wings aloft and outspread legs, one set of talons holding an olive branch and one set holding a bundle of thirteen arrows (denoting the powers of peace and war). In front of his torso is a shield. Behind the eagle is a background of sun rays, with thirteen clouds across the top and thirteen stars below them (depicting the original 13 states). In its mouth, the eagle is clutching a banner that floats over its head and which reads “E PLURIBUS UNUM” (meaning: “Out of many, one”). This entire insignia is surrounded by a ring of 50 stars (one for each US state). Outside this ring of stars is written at the top of the coin “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and at the bottom of the coin “HALF DOLLAR”.I would like to have as many coins as possible described this extensively for blind people.Therefore, I have built a web site which hosts the description of different objects, including coins. Originally I was going to concentrate on coins only, but I have received much feedback suggesting that in the same manner, buildings, animals, logos, and many other types of objects could be described which are otherwise impossible to touch.So far almost a hundred coins are described, but to make this site globally usable and enjoyable, at least a good sample of current circulation coinage would be necessary. I am looking for volunteers who would be willing to describe some of their favorite coins and make this information available to blind people.My intention wasn't to replicate a coin catalog, since many exist already. Rather, to provide information which is missing from the catalogs for obvious reasons, but would be essential to blind people. Those who would like to find more information about an individual coin will have a link on each page to Numista where they can find the related catalog item. I have chosen Numista because it is free, and is very accessible with different screen readers.This web site is also intended to be free to enhance the education of blind people, and potentially get more visually impaired people interested in numismatics.Please help me to make this project a reality. I would like to ask you to share this idea with others, or to describe some coins for posting on the site.The web site can be found at:http://LetTheBlindSee.com/wiki/coinsFor more information, you can contact me at:Tom at BlindCoinCollector dot com

READ MORE
26 Aug 2015

Numismatica - a numismatic journey

| alphaNumis

I'm Gilbert C., from Malaysia, I collect world banknotes and coins.

READ MORE
25 Aug 2015

ANA Facebook

Coins | Joebear

On the Facebook page the other day someone invoked the 1996 UK treasure act as a concern for collectors all over. How does that work? Also the German law won't affect us I believe since we are not yet Germany. I remember hearing of our government confiscating PM's in 1933, but the collectors are so many with so much material it would take a massive effort to retrieve goods that would easily be stashed or removed to other countries. Add that many are armed and I think there is a good case for collectors being safe for some time to come.

READ MORE

Money.org Blog and Forum Terms & Conditions of Use / Disclaimer

This is a community-sourced blog. Any views or opinions represented in this blog are personal and belong solely to the blog post’s author, and do not represent the views or opinions of the American Numismatic Association, and may not represent the views or opinions of people, institutions or organizations that the author may or may not be associated with in professional or personal capacity.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The American Numismatic Association (ANA) makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The ANA does not monitor the blog on a constant basis.

The ANA will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Downloadable Files and Images

Any downloadable file, including but not limited to pdfs, docs, jpegs, pngs, is provided at the user’s own risk. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages resulting from a corrupted or damaged file.

Blog/Forum Posts and Comments

In these terms and conditions, “user content” means material including without limitation text, images, audio material, video material, and audio-visual material that you submit to this website, for whatever purpose.

Blog/forum posts and comments are encouraged. However, the ANA reserves the right to edit or delete any blog/forum posts or comments without notice. User content deemed to fall under the following categories will be removed and may prompt disciplinary actions, including, but not limited to, review and suspension/revocation of blog and forum privileges:

  • User content deemed to be spam or questionable spam.
  • User content intended for commercial purposes or to buy, sell or trade items.
  • User content containing profanity.
  • User content containing language or concepts that could be deemed offensive.
  • User content containing hate speech, credible threats, or direct attacks on an individual or group.

In addition, user content shall not be illegal or unlawful, shall not infringe any third party’s legal rights, and shall not be capable of giving rise to legal action whether against you, the ANA, or a third party under any applicable law.

The ANA may terminate your access to all or any part of the website at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice, effective immediately. If you wish to terminate this Agreement or your Money.org account (if you have one), you may simply discontinue using the website. All provisions of this Agreement which by their nature should survive termination shall survive termination, including, without limitation, ownership provisions, warranty disclaimers, indemnity and limitations of liability.

The ANA reserves the right to display advertisements on your account and blog pages.

This blog’s terms & conditions of use / disclaimer is subject to change at anytime.

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.