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31 Aug 2017

The South African Rand

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

The Rand is the currency of South Africa. This currency is not one that is heard much about, though its history and system of exchange is quite interesting. The history of this currency has mirrored the history of this country, ever since the first instance of this system of money being used. This currency of South Africa has continued to be used up to today.

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31 Aug 2017

Money Related Idioms

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

Money has always been a large part of society, and, because of this, has become a part of our speech. An idiom is a phrase that means something different than it says and is commonly said meaning this. Examples include “tighten your belt” and “pony up”, among others. In this post, I shall write about idioms that relate to numismatics and how they came to be. The two covered will be “worth one’s salt” and “Don’t take a wooden nickel”.

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31 Aug 2017

The Clay Money of Japan

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

During World War Two, many countries, including Japan, lost money and were forced to desperate measures, especially involving currency. In some places, people were forced to use cardboard money, or another very worthless currency. In our country nowadays, we have a fiat system (not brought upon by the war), which is controversial among numismatists, though at least our coins are still made out of metal, unlike these clay items. Anyway, here’s the article about the clay coins.

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31 Aug 2017

Digital Camera/Microscope Used

| user_9894

What digital camera or digital microscope do some of you use/recommend ?

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31 Aug 2017

The one and only

Coins-United States | CoinLady

While browsing in the coin shop yesterday I spotted a classic commemorative, one of the more desirable coins. The Missouri half dollar is one of the tougher coins in the set. This coin was a nice MS-62 and would have fit into a great set.

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30 Aug 2017

New Find! Check your Change!

Coins | Caleb Karling

So recently I was looking through some change that I got from a McDonald's drive thru. I found a 1964-D Washington quarter. But whats really special about this find its a D/D. I can't really tell which mint mark is the repuched mint mark, I do believe its the one to the east that's on top. This is first known D/D that is like this. Just comes to show anything can be in your change.

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30 Aug 2017

Reminisciences of an Old Coin Hoarder

Coins | Ancient Collector

One of the things I love about the Blog page is it allows me to sit back and remember many of the happy experiences I have had in collecting coins. Today I will indulge in a little boasting about my visit to The Mint. By The Mint I mean the new San Francisco Mint, the Fort on the Bluff just up from Down Town off Market Street and on Dubosc, as I remember. I was a Cub Scout in 1949, and our Pack had a tour of the Mint. Mostly I remember it was grimy and dark and very labor intensive, unlike the current automated lines you see in Philly. One of the really high points was when we were each allowed to hold a gold brick, all 26 pound of it. In those days, the value was only $10,920. Today the value would be just under half a million. The real treasure for a collectorthat I got was a 4x6 card printed with a picture of the Mint and the words, Compliments of the United States Mint, San Francisco. Attached was a brand new 1949-S penny. You can believeme - I still have both card and penny.

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30 Aug 2017

Modern Numismatics

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

As stated in the previous article about this topic (which I suggest you read, if you haven’t), the history of the hobby that we have all grown to enjoy is almost as fascinating as the collecting itself. In this article, the story of numismatics and coin collecting (there is a distinction, one that I often forget), will be covered in depth, tracking a very general history of the hobby/study throughout the years.

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