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05 Aug 2020

Show-n-tell “NATIONAL COIN SHORTAGE”

Collecting Tips | Haney

Like many of you I have seen the signs indicating there is a national coin shortage. That said I have a few items of encouragement for those of us who still collect coins by finding them.

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05 Aug 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Part 5- California

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello Folks. To the West Coast now, to the state where nature meets fame. California.California was once the barren enclave of the United States. The state won its independence from Mexico, using the flag that is now one the state flag. Joining the Union as a free state as part of the disastrous Compromise of 1850, California was just a frontier until gold was found in 1849. That gold sent people west, sending California into statehood just a year later. California stayed as a naturalist haven, thanks to John Muir, until the late 1800's. Then, the movie industry flocked to North LA, creating Hollywood and other towns like Culver City and Inglewood, two of LA's suburbs built on the luxury industry. Soon after, the state became a resort for the rich, turning California from the conservative roots into one of the liberal states in America. Famous people include Jack London, John Muir, George Lucas, and many, many more.To the coins now.California, despite being a playground for the rich and hob-nob, has not shied away from its natural beauty. This, instead of film, is personified on both the 50 State Quarter and the America the Beautiful Quarter. Both feature some view of Yosemite, El Captian on the 50 state and Half Dome on the other. The giant sequoia and naturalist John Muir is located on the 50 state to totally encompass California's natural beauty.California, for its 75th anniversary in 1925, received a commemorative half. The front features a gold miner, while the back features a bear, the animal on the state flag. Designed by Jo Mora, the design was criticized, most notably by James Earle Fraser, but is now considered on of the better commemorative designs in the classic series.Also, in 1915, a series of commemoratives came out, touting the Panama Convention in San Fran that year. There were five coins. A Half, a gold dollar, a quarter eagle, and most notably, a $50 gold piece. That was ridiculous, even for the time. Farran Zerbe sold them for a huge cost. But, if you bought it in 1915, you have just made a HUGE profit. The round and octagonal piece are now very rare, and in MS-63 state will give you about $87,000 for each, on average. The $50 was a design by Robert Aitken. The others were Charles Barber, George Morgan, and Charles Keck. If you buy them all, it will set you back over $150,000.If you are a fan of private gold, you probably know who Templeton Reid is. Reid, after being slandered in Georgia, left the big peach for California, were he re-opened his mint and began creating coins. He didn't create much. He created one type, a rather bland coin, as private minters couldn't do as much detail as the real mint did.Past coins, one of the 4 mints are located here. The San Francisco Mint. The mint created the mint here to create a spot were gold coming in from the gold rush could be instantly created into coins. Now, the only responsibility is to create proofs and silver eagles.Thank You!

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03 Aug 2020

Coins in your Pocket - Errors and Varieties 3

Coins | JudeA

This coins in your pocket blog will be about more errors and varieties that I look for. Let me know if you are enjoying this series, because I enjoy writing them! Pre YN Auction frenzy is settling in, and I'm trying to get as many YN dollars as possible before the auction! I will still try to keep the blogs enjoyable though, not cranking out low quality work (I hope you think my work isn't low quality!) Anyways, lets start!

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03 Aug 2020

Barber Through and Through Part Three

| Big Nub Numismatics

Today we'll take a look at some of Barber's lesser known works, but also some of his earliest. We'll journey to his incredible 1883 work done for Hawaii.Hawaii today is a tour filled paradise filled with tropical plants and animals native to the island. Popular for vacations, honeymoons, weddings, you name it, its history is most often overlooked for its beauty. What started out as a chain of islands inhabited by Polynesians turned into a thriving kingdom. When white men initially came, they were fought off, and killed after failed "negotiations" ( The first white man to land on Hawaii took the king hostage in return for his stolen boat, he was killed by the tribesmen). Hawaii's fertile land and tropical climate provided an excellent opportunity for businessmen to grow rare crops such as pineapple and sugar to sell on their mainland, this ultimately led to their downfall. When unrest grew from the natives over succession to the throne, both the US and Great Britain brought troops to gain control, and thus more power from the natives. Towards the later half of the 19th century, White "fruit men", as I call them (Dole and such)from the US forced the king of Hawaii to sign a paper stripping the natives of their rights, giving it to the white settlers. Hawaii turned into a cash-crop station for Western civilization which led to its annexation, and finally statehood by the US. But they did gain at least one thing of value, Some Barber coinage. In order to keep the Hawaiian economy from collapsing due to overproduction and an influx of foreign silver, the US decided to strike coinage for the islands in return for the cost of production. The chief engraver Charles was put to the task of creating these coins which turned out great. Deemed one of the best looking busts around, the King was portrayed the obverse of the dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar like no other, and thus Kalakaua coinage was created after King Kalakaua. Rare 12 1/2 cent pieces are the product of beaucratic red tape and misunderstanding. The Hawaiian government initially wanted to use its original denominations, so Barber produced hubs and dies for a 12 1/2 cent piece, but just weeks from minting them, the Hawaiian government decided it would mimic the US's monetary system completely, and the design was fitted for a dime. These dies were finished the following year in 1884, but were all dated 1883. Like most island nations, the reverse bore Hawaii's coat of arms. Charles was also praised for his work on the ability to strike these coins. They were incredibly soft on dies, so more could be struck much more easily than previous conceptions. It was barber at his finest. Shortlived, these coins lasted from 1883 until 1903 putting nearly a million dollars worth of coinage into the economy. The illegal coup to overtake the islands by the US and the successive annexation in 1898 caused Congress to enact a law in order to get rid of the Hawaiian issued coins, about 80% were melted down in return for actual US silver. Barber's best portrayal has some incredibly complex and somewhat evil past behind it. As most of these coins were destroyed, they are highly sought after in all grades, and proof specimens can realize much more than many US coins. With such little notice, barber created a masterful design in less than a few months. 1. Red Book, Hawaii issue section

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03 Aug 2020

Look What I Found

Coins | Mike B

What to do on a hot day? Well I turn on the air and go to my collection of 27 years now. I go though different coins one coin books another mint coins another all slabed, raw coins This takes allot of my time. I see them in a new perspective. For instance the 1964 20 count 6 round squares of Kennedys. Opened only twice in all these years.. Now I grade very well. Im 94% right .The Kennedy's I would grade at 66 or 67. That's the luster nothing on them not even dust. They were sealed.. I find treasures and think back to when I bought them. The coin below is a Fugio 1787. Do not ask me when I got this. The Obverse has the date and the wording below with high magnification says Mind Your Own Businesse. Wow. I have read about these. I knew I would never own one. The only thing I can think of is the coin fairy left it under my pillow. I don't know anyone who owns one. I will be sending it in. I'm not worried about the grade. .I'm worried that's it's real. To own a coin like this is a piece of our history. It's the earliest American Coin I own. 1787. That's clear and we are one is also visable. I'm curious to what metal was used. Copper pewter. I can not tell. The only thing I can think of is someone made a mistake on sending me a coin I ordered and by accident i got this. I own coins Xf I don't own a good. It doesn't matter as long as it's real. It was in a NGC box were I put rare coins. That's what I was doing yesterday.. No it's not a million dollars. I would be thrilled if it was worth a buck. Because you see coin collecting is not about value. Or how much is this worth. It's about collecting our history. It's about beauty. It's collecting something we like. Something every coin tells. A story. If this one could talk I would ask it were did you come from. It has to come after my accident. Unconscious for three months fractured neck and back. My memory and allot of my brain function I lost. This could explain me getting it. A relative or one of my neurosurgeons who got me collecting. Well we're ever it came from it will go th NGC. There's a story in this coin . Maybe they can help me with it. I hope you enjoyed this. Remember coins we collect today are for the future. That when you ask I wonder how much this is?

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03 Aug 2020

the world we live in

Coins-United States | user_74359

the world in which we live in is an ever changing place, new policies to our monetary system is happening and there is an amazing thing that could happen to those that understand and is on the right side of this wealth transfer caused by a poorly led monetary policy with almost a century long debt cycle. i don"t know exactly what our world will look like in 10 years but i do know it'll be nothing like how we knew it. corona virus kicked off a lot of things and is the perfect cover up for planned events to occur and be excepted, social distancing, phasing cash out of the economy, its easy to say an economy collapsed due to a pandemic, for the most part everyone knows or can kind of feel that things are not and has not been right for some time, the reality is the average person knows nothing about money, economics, monetary policy, trade wars between countries, how one might try to hurt the other government by tarrifs and such. i know theres not much i can do for the world and theres still so much i dont know yet but what i do know is now is the time to make sound investment decisions and to make sure my family is protected by gold, silver and crypto, the crypto is highly debated but would invest some into it for the chances of prices exploding when demand increases after the world make there switch from the industrial age to the digital\informative age. we are living in one of the most intense times in world history and for the most part is being left in the dark about things so always do your own personal education because as we all know we will not get it from schools because they stopped teaching us what we need to know along time ago and brainwashed us to think getting a job with a paycheck and government benefits is the best thing for you to do, dont fall into their trap, dont work for money, create your own sources of wealth and prepare for anything. please understand i am not a doomsday conspiracy theorist, i only try to prepare for the future not predict it

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03 Aug 2020

Book review - Coin Clinic, by Alan Herbert

Coins | JudeA

Coin Clinic was written by Alan Herbert. It basically is filled with 1001 questions that people mailed to him, and he made a book out of them. The book has 56 chapters all containing different types of questions! The chapters are things like what different abbreviations mean, or famous hoards of coins, or illegal to own coins. I actually learned so much from this book. I only knew about ¼ of the abbreviations in the abbreviations section, and some of the chapters contained stuff I had never heard of before. One section was entirely devoted to the Blake and Co. $20 Copies, which I had never heard of before, and what I gathered is that it’s another very valuable $20 gold piece, and that there are numerous copies of it that fool people regularly. It turns out one such piece was subject to a lawsuit between different members in a family, but the coin turned out to be a fake! Another thing I learned is that the speediest work by the government in passing the law for a new coin was the copper and nickel 3 cent coin, which was passed in just one day! This book has so many facts about coins, and contains literally hours of reading material. I definitely would recommend this book to anyone who has been collecting for a couple of years. It was a great read, and I thoroughly enjoyed it!

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02 Aug 2020

Numismatic Book Review- United States Gold Coins

| Big Nub Numismatics

United States gold coins have always been out of reach to me. With their metal content alone being worth a small fortune, I never pushed past the Silver dollars in the Red Book, but I always remained curious. Some of the designs such as the Indian Head gold pieces and the St. Gaudens double eagle were always pictured on books covers, and I've always felt their were some of the best engraved designs the US mint had produced. When it came to researching gold coins, I was lost. I didn't have any major reference books on gold in my library, so when it came time to find more about the $4 Stella, I looked at the back of the Red Book's bibliography and found the name David Akers up and down the gold section. Searching more into this, i found that he had produced a book perfect for what I needed,United States Gold Coins: An Analysis Of Auction Records: Volume III Three Dollar Gold Pieces, 1854-1889 And Four Dollar Gold Pieces, 1879-1880,By David Akers.

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02 Aug 2020

The Fasces: Seldom Discussed Symbols in Numismatics #3

Coins-United States | I. R. Bama

Take a look at the reverse of the Mercury Dime. What's that thing on the back there?

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