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22 Sep 2019

Quarters of Provinces

Coins | user_45166

Before the United States started the state quarter program in 1999, Canada changed the design of the quarter for a special occasion. In 1992, Canada issued a different 25 cent coin for each of its ten provinces and 2 territories as part of the 125th anniversary of the Canadian Federation. Each design was chosen from people who sent in their drawings. At the time, there were only 2 territories, because Nunavut was not created until 1999.

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22 Sep 2019

Trip to London & the New Bank Notes

| Ancient Collector

Just got back from 12 days in London. Had a great time and say a few of the multitude of sights to visit. My wife needed a wheelchair at many of the venues, but that gave us access to back areas the general public never sees, such as at Buckingham Palace.

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22 Sep 2019

**Wish List Coins**

Exonumia | Kepi

Hi everyone! I'm sure we all have those certain coins that we long for. They are on our "Wish List"... they're not totally out of reach, we just haven't quite bit the bullet yet and pushed that "Buy now" button. Two of those coins for me is a $20 Double Eagle Saint-Gaudens and the $50 Gold American Buffalo Bullion Coin. So in the meantime until I find those perfect coins that "talk" to me I have added these silver bullion examples to my collection. One of these days I'll blog about a newly acquired "Wish List" Gold Coin, but for now I hope you enjoy these silver beauties as I have. Whats your "special" coin that you hope to add to your collection in the future? Thanks for reading my blog. All comments are welcomed. ; )

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22 Sep 2019

Half Dimes - Draped Bust (Heraldic Eagle Reverse) and Capped Bust: 1800 - 1829

| user_4449

In 1800, there was another LIBERTY error, although this time it was a K instead of an R, reading LIBEKTY. However that one is not as rare, and is worth about the same as the regular 1800 half dime, although in higher grades it can be worth a few thousand more. Around 300 are known of today. In 1802 there is the biggest key date of the Heraldic Eagle Reverse sub-series, with only 3060 half dimes struck, reaching $25,000 in AG-3, and $350,000 in AU-50. Only around 35 of these dimes are known today. The following year, 1803, there was a Large 8 and Small 8 die variety, where they are worth about the same in lower grades, but as they get into higher grades, the Small 8 is worth $60,000 more than the Large 8, in MS-63. Only around 25 Small 8 die variety are known today. In 1805, 15,600 half dimes were struck, making it the second biggest key date of the Heraldic Eagle Reverse sub-series, excluding die varieties. Only around 300 are known today, with one over a grade of 60, but none over 65. 1805 was the last year the Heraldic Eagle Reverse was struck, and it was also the last year that the Draped Bust half dimes were struck. The Capped Bust was the next variety of half dimes coined by the US mint. The capped bust half dime had the same composition as the 1792 half disme and the draped bust half dime and again was all coined at the Philadelphia mint. It was designed by John Reich, and the main difference on the obverses is that for the obverse of the draped bust half dime, the bust faces her left, while in the capped bust series, her bust now faces her right. There is a ribbon in Liberty’s hair on the draped bust design, where in the capped bust, she’s wearing a cap. The actual word “LIBERTY” is above the bust of Lady Liberty on the draped design, but for the capped, it is on the actual cap. For the reverse, it was a bit of a combination of the two reverses seen in the previous series. The draped bust had two reverse designs, one of a bald eagle hatchling, but it got a lot of criticism over being too scrawny, so it was changed to the presidential seal. However for the capped bust reverse, it was another bald eagle, only this time not a hatchling and now it is facing it’s right. It now holds three arrows in its left talon, symbolizing strength, and an olive branch in its right talon, for peace. On its chest is a US shield, with 6 horizontal lines and 13 vertical stripes. Under the talons of the eagle is 5 C. The capped bust is the only half dime in US history with the actual value in cents of the coin. Every other dime has said one dime, except for the draped bust dime which had no value on it. For the draped bust dime, the value just had to be determined based on the size, which caused confusion for foreign visitors and even for Americans, getting the half dime and the dime mixed up during the times when they had the same designs.

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22 Sep 2019

Half Dimes - Draped Bust Small Eagle Reverse: 1796 - 1797

| user_4449

The Flowing Hair Half Dime was minted for only one year, 1975, however given both the 1795 date as well as the previous year, 1974. The following series was the Draped Bust, and split into two sub series, the Small Eagle Reverse, that was later followed by the Heraldic Eagle Reverse. These bore a new obverse and reverse design, one most likely made by Gilbert Stuart. Along with all other circulating pieces at the time, it had a bust of Liberty facing her left and a small standing bald eagle hatchling perched on a cloud with its wings stretched out, surrounded by palm and olive branches on the reverse. All Half Dimes of this series were struck at the Philadelphia mint. The half dimes made in 1796 were very prone to error, with two different errors standing out the most, the 1796, 6 over 5 error that is worth well over two thousand dollars in G-4 condition. At a Heritage Auction in 2008, one of these went for $345,000 in MS-66 condition. The other error was that the obverse said LIKERTY, instead of Liberty. During early coinage of the US, this error was seen a good amount, and my favorite one is the E PLUKIBUS UNUM, also with a K where a B should be, error on the post colonial cent, the New Jersey coinage in 1786. In 1797, there are three varieties, one with 13 stars on the obverse, one with 15 stars and one with 16 stars. The 13 stars are for the original thirteen colonies of the United States. The 15 stars were for the then 15 current states of the union. A 16th star was added with the addition of Tennessee. However, the mint director at the time, Elias Boudinot, feared that too many stars would crowd the obverse of the half dime, and that adding a new star for every new state was a bad idea. His idea was to change the number of stars to just be 13 - for the original colonies, 7 stars on the right of the bust of Liberty, and 6 on the right. 1797 was the last year of coinage for the Draped Bust - Small Eagle Reverse. The bust of Liberty stayed the same - but there was criticism on the hatchling on the reverse, saying the bald eagle was scrawny, so it was changed to the seal of the United States, portraying a larger, stronger eagle holding an olive branch in its left talon and a bundle of 13 arrows in its right. No Half Dimes were minted in between the transition, so from 1798-1799 no half dimes were struck.

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22 Sep 2019

Trip to the coin shop - #1

Coins | JudeA

I went to my local coin shop today. I hadn't been there in a while so I didn't know what to expect. I forgot to bring my early S mint marked cents to trade for a '14 D. I walked in and looked at the table of random things they have. It usually has some Lincoln Bicentennials and I buy those. Lo and behold, the table has a mint sealed box of LP3 pennys, the item I was looking at on eBay, and it was only priced at $2! They are priced at $10 each on eBay, and this was only $1 above face value! I also bought a 10x Wide Field H.E. Haris Loupe. I bought the pennys I needed to fill up my album, a '47 s, a '48 s, and a 1949 s. That was it the total came to $20. I am really happy with this visit as I got more Lincoln Bicentennials to add to my ever growing collection!

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21 Sep 2019

neatcoins.com

| user_60591

Visit our online shop and blog: neatcoins.comneatcoins.com/blogOur Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/neatcoins/

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21 Sep 2019

Roll searching - Part 4

Coins | JudeA

I got another roll from my bank today. It was circulated and I had a pretty good haul. I noticed a lack of wheat cents however. Here are the finds

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20 Sep 2019

Numismatic Book Review-Second Annual CPMX Show and Auction

| Big Nub Numismatics

This is an excellent source for finding history on Paper Money. Flipping through the pages you can see just about a million dollars in face value of historic paper money spanning from 1860's series one dollar bills, to bills worth thousands just in face value. This book can help you find those real rarity sto be looking for, including errors, and some bills not even listed in the Guide to US paper Money by Whitman. This book centers focus on the collection of H.H. Pinkerton. He had quite eclectic collection of notes, however it was still organized. This collection houses some of the oddest currency and most historic. Included in this book is a letter from Stockton National State bank, if you have never heard of it, it is because only a few thousand sheets of currency were ever printed and released there. You can be assured, if there is a note, this man had it. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to sit down and just pours through millions of dollars worth of collectables, or if you want to do some research on Paper Money from the US, and especially fro texas.

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