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31 Oct 2019

Twenty Cents 1874, Leading up to the Release for Circulation

| user_4449

As the reverse and obverse were so similar to other coins of the time, the obverse design was given credit to Christian Gobretch and the Reverse was given credit to William Barber, designer of the Trade Dollar. The mint director, Linderman, said that he would have decided on a different reverse, however there is a law stating that an eagle had to appear on all silver reverses, larger than the dime. There was a lot of criticism on the eagle on the reverse, saying it was an uglier, flatter, more awkward looking eagle than the other silver at the time. The reverse that Linderman liked the most had a wreath on the reverse, one that looked like the wreath on the 1859 Indian Cent. There was a bow on the bottom. The wreath did not connect at the top, and it said ⅕ OF A DOLLAR inside of the wreath. On the outside was UNITED STATES OF AMERICA above the wreath and below the wreath was TWENTY CENTS. It was basically the reverse of the 1859 Indian cent, just changed, and because it lacked an eagle, it was put into circulation. The other obverse that Linderman liked was “Liberty by the Seashore.” It showed a Seated Liberty on her rock, still facing her right, however her body was on the left of the rock, instead of the right. She was sitting on the beach, and instead of a shield at her feet, there was a seashell that read Liberty. There were waves that came up to her feet, and out at sea there was a steam powered ship. IN GOD WE TRUST and E PLURIBUS UNUM does not appear on either the second place patterns, nor the actual coin. Under the act of 1873, coinage must have E PLURIBUS UNUM, however it was either an oversight made by the designers and the mint director, or it was not strongly in effect. The reverse was also different to the other coinage at the time, as TWENTY CENTS was spelled out, not shortened to dol. or half dol. The mint mark was on the reverse, under and in between the eagles talons. The Twenty Cent piece weighed five grams and was composed of 90% silver and 10% copper. As an effort to try and keep the twenty cent piece from being too similar to the quarter, the edges were smooth, not a reeded edge like the other silver coinage at the time. Th Twenty Cent piece was also not given a nickname, like most small currency. The one cent is called the penny, there was the nickel, dime, they were not called the one cent, the five cents or the ten cent, however the twenty cent was just called the twenty cent.

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31 Oct 2019

Twenty Cent Pieces - 1874, Behind the Idea

| user_4449

Twenty Cent Pieces were the shortest lasting denomination struck by the United States. While this series only takes up one page in the Red Book, it does have a lot of history behind maybe the least known coin in United States history. Before I begin, I remember one day going to a coin store in Boulder, CO for my birthday, and I got like $30 to spend. They had had a twenty cent piece there the previous year, cleaned and scratched and in very poor condition, and therefore somewhat affordable. I asked to see if they had any like that, and the person helping me was obvioulsy new, becuase he called me dumb and said that there is no such thing as a United States twenty cent piece. I smiled and then went to the other person to ask, and he said that they only had some in the vault, and none I could afford, and the other guy was shocked. I actually did find a 1875-S a few years later in PRAG condition i grabbed for $30. Anyway, the twenty cent piece was proposed by the Nevada senator, John Jones in 1874. This was not the first time the twenty cent piece had been proposed, already being shot down at least twice. And, although rare, there were still some twenty cent pieces of old Spanish Colonial Coinage that still appeared in the West from time to time, like a wheat penny or a Winged Liberty Head Dime. At the time of his election, there was a big shortage of small change circulating the West. As he was a senator for a state in the West, this was the biggest matter he pressed for, and it got approved. While 1874 does not seem that long ago, in the West, there were still many wars with Native Americans, and people were still hanged, and before the early 1900s, there weren’t even towns in many of the states such as Wyoming, Montana, etc, and many states were only settled in a few areas due to a gold rush, or where there were forts built for fighting Native Americans. So, in order to try and find a fix to the shortage, Jones proposed a twenty cent piece. The bill was passed, and the mint director at the time, Henry Linderman, had patterns struck. He decided on a Liberty Seated Obverse, that would remain the obverse for the whole coinage of twenty cents. He also decided on a reverse that was somewhat similar to the other silver coins at the time, but it was also somewhat different. The biggest thing was that the eagle’s stance was different, there was no shield on the chest of the eagle, and the eagle on the reverse of the twenty cent had very recognizable talons. It was nearly identical to the reverse of the Trade Dollar.

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31 Oct 2019

The Age of Revolution and the Birth of Chilean Coinage

Coins-World | user_1727

Numismatics and history are very closely connected. From the earliest coinage to modern commemoratives, coins tell the story of triumph, conquest and tragedy throughout history. They tell the story of kings and of revolutions, exploration and innovation. This series looks at the history of the Modern World through the lense of 20 coins.

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30 Oct 2019

Coins in your Pocket - Part 3, Quarters

Coins | JudeA

First of, I really do enjoy writing these blogs. I continue to search my pocket change, pulling aside examples of coins that I mention in my Coins in your Pocket, blog posts. I do not post the errors that I search for in these, however. These examples are examples of non-error coins that I save. I might do a separate series of error/variety coins I search for. Also, there are two things, error, and variety. Basically an error is something that doesn't repeat exactly, and an error is something that repeats exactly, or close to exactly. Both are unintentionally made by the mint. Tell me in the comments if you are enjoying these blogs, and if you would like me to do an variety version in the future. Now lets get to the blog, this is #3, and it is about quarters!#1 - Silver Quarters: Yes, they are still out there. They have been picked relentlessly for their silver value, but you can still find them occasionally. They will sell for about $3.00 for their junk silver value, unless they are in good grades, then they might sell for more.#2 - W mint marked quarters: In 2019, the US Mint decided to include a W mint mark on 10 million of the quarters struck there. That would be 2 million W quarters per design. They were added to try to increase interest in coin collecting, the mint director said. The quarters with the W mint mark are, Lowell National Historic Park (Massachusetts), American Memorial Park (Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands), War in the Pacific National Historic Park (Guam), San Antonio Mission National Historical Park (Texas), and the Frank Church River of No Return Wilderness (Idaho). The quarters are only available in circulation, you can't buy them from the mint. A report says that only about 2% of the total quarters with the W mint mark have been found. They sell for about $10 to $20 on eBay, depending on the grade.#3 - State Quarters: The mint issued this coin program in 1999. It continued until 2008, and celebrated all of the 50 states in the USA. The coins were issued 5 per year, and were issued in order that they were admitted into the US. They are still widely available in pocket change. You can buy a folder and fill up it with coins from change relatively easy. The coins are available in just about any grade desirable, and will sell for face value, or more in better grades.#4 - America The Beautiful (ATB) Quarters: The state quarters program was so successful that the mint decided to do another program. This one featured all of the Monument Parks in America. The series started in 2010, featuring Hot Springs National Park, in Arkansas, to start off the series. The series, as of 2019, is still going. Plans are to stop the series in 2021, with only one quarter being released that year, which is the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, located in Alabama. The coins can be found in circulation, and you can put together a set easily from coins in circulation. Coins will sell for a little above face value in better grades.

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29 Oct 2019

Freak Show 1968 - IX

Coins | Haney

Hello again, I have to say selecting the freak to close with was almost harder than choosing the one to lead with. I was lucky enough to add two more members to my cast from the most recent offering of ghouls from Heritage's special offering ERROR COINS online auction in September. Despite picking up a really grotesque freak from Heritage I ended up choosing a monster of a double date I acquired during the most recent ANA show held in Texas. I really did not have my eyes quite adjusted on the dealer’s inventory when I first saw this coin in the case. I was prepared to look at a rather unusual clipped Kennedy I had seen in the dealer’s inventory online now in person, but sadly it was eclipsed by this one that I am showing you today. I even had to make that really hard choice of do I get them both or do I leave one behind. My budget not being as large as the state I reside I did have to choose one so the clipped 1968 Kennedy ended up in another's collection whereas the double date Kennedy found a new home with my troop of misfits. Of course the story is not as sad as it seems as I did leave out that I had my eye on a 1968 quarter on cent planchet in another dealer’s inventory that has a beautiful blue hue that I also took home that day. So any remorse felt for my loss should be weighed by the fact I added two members that day too, so boo-hoo for me, NOT!

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26 Oct 2019

Roll searching - Part 4

Coins | JudeA

I got a new box of pennies from the bank today. Here are the finds.Wheat cents - 4, surprising that I only got 4 of these, they didn't show up until the 20th roll.Lincoln Bicentennials - 20! I got my all time high on these coins! 12 of the FY, 4 of the EC, and 4 of the PL, none of the LP4 design.Foreign - 2. Two Canadian cents2017 P - 7, I always keep these, I just like the design on them.Other - I found a strike doubled 1968 s cent. The strike doubling is very evident, and it could be confused with regular doubling.

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25 Oct 2019

Napoleon's Kingdom of Italy

Coins-World | user_1727

Numismatics and history are very closely connected. From the earliest coinage to modern commemoratives, coins tell the story of triumph, conquest and tragedy throughout history. They tell the story of kings and of revolutions, exploration and innovation. This series looks at the history of the Modern World through the lense of 20 coins from around the world.

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25 Oct 2019

Monthly YN auction wins!

Coins | JudeA

I received my Yn auction win in the mail today! It is a 1937 d, with an obverse strike through error. You can see the strike through much better when you see the coin in person. It looks like it is in between the N in IN and the G in GOD. I still believe it was wire or some grease. Feel free to comment what you think it is!

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