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31 Dec 2019

A Happy And Wonderful New Year

Coins | Mike B

Hi everyone. Well someone has to wish everyone a happy New year might as well be me. But the important part is have a safe one. For some it's amateur night. Take Mass Transit when you can. And try I know it's hard to keep a resolution or two. Maybe cut down on some things. I can only pray and hope the mint does a 360 and try to provide coins and commens that will make this country proud. The Silver Eagle will be changing soon. But they have to realize we keep them in business. We should have coins and commens we can be proud of. Not like Ellis Island with a child holding an American Flag with no stars. So a Happy and safe one to all. Enjoy and let's look forward to a better year. Thanks.

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31 Dec 2019

What's Your New Year's Resolutions for the U.S. Mint?

| Well worn Copper

After making enough New Year resolutions for yourself (yeah, sure!) some folks even suggest a few for friends and family. This got me thinking about the U.S. Mint, and what they could improve upon in 2020, compared to 2019. I have a few, and invite my fellow collectors to suggest a few of their own. (Who knows, they might be listening in.) Mine are: 1. More outstanding commemoratives like the Apollo 11 silver dollar. 2. Give ANA members a "place in line" when offering super rarities that "sell out" in an hour. 3. Strike more "W" mint mark coinage for circulation, but hold back a few thousand, and offer examples in MS69 for a limited time to collectors. That said, here's wishing a happy New Year to all my fellow ANA members. May your 2020 grade a Sheldon 70!

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30 Dec 2019

My favorite topic... "The Mint has sold out again in under and hour"

| user_90007

The Mint had a great idea. The minted an ASE-S Enhanced Reverse Proof coin. The bad part of their idea is that they only made 30,000 and they were all sold out in under and hour. Our "friends" that are coin dealers have a system whereby they buy "special" limited quantity coins for a bonus of about $150-$250, depending on the demand. Evidently, the demand for the coins is high because some of them are selling on ebay and other television dealers from $500 to $3,000. They did something like that quite a while ago when the included an ASE-2 in the Congratulation Set. It was the one and only time that I bought one from "Rick" for about $100. As far as an Enhanced Reverse Proof Coin, one of them were included in the USA/Canada set, only it was minted at West Point.As far as the ASE-S ERP coin, it ain't worth it boys and girls. Down the road apiece, you'll get one for about $200.

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29 Dec 2019

Question I hope gets answered

| user_71530

Does anyone know if there are any Numismatists conventions in Boston 2020 I ‘ve searched and found one but I’m going somewhere else while the convention happens.

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29 Dec 2019

Christmas

| user_71530

Got 4 silver american eagles for Christmas, 2 graded MS-70 and 2 not graded but in great condition, as well as a 2009 proof set and 1983 Philadelphia souvenir set along with a book with 120 world coins. I’m very grateful for my family. I hope you all had a great holiday!

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29 Dec 2019

Calendar Medals: Another Way to Welcome in The New Year

| Well worn Copper

Calendar Medals were struck beginning in the 1700's. At the time they enabled you to carry the yearly calendar in your pocket . Some depicted the entire yearly calendar while others only listed Christian holidays. The medals were typically about the size of a silver dollar and always dated. Like other things of old, they eventually fell out of use and have been since been delegated to the Art Medal category. They are still struck, usually in high relief, and probably make good birthday or Christmas gifts. I've never owned one nor knew anyone who collected them, but they have their followers. While older(1700-1900) medals carry premiums, modern editions are very affordable. Private mints, such as the Franklin Mint and Medallic Art Company, issued them for many years and took them to another level.

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28 Dec 2019

A night at the Holborn

Exonumia | user_18007

I so much enjoyed this article in this month's "The Numismatist," because I have one of these medals and often wondered what it was all about. A big thank you to Tom Lopez Ph. D.My copy of the medal appears to be bronzed, but the lead is beginning to show through in places.It bears the inscription: To Duncan Davidson, Esq. DL Sept. 30th 1895I don't know what the significance of "DL" is. I acquired it almost 35 years ago in London, because it had my name (Davidson) on it, although I'm absolutely sure that the Davidson on the medal is not related to me.Anybody else got one of these? We should let the author know, so he can update his list of them.

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28 Dec 2019

Another Hoard? Please what Happened to Inventory?

Coins | Mike B

Hi my friends. Please have a safe New Year's Eve. Take Mass Transit. I tape coin shows at night. Because of my condition. I was watching the the Rick Tomaska show this morning . Now I watch him because the coins he sells he gets into the details. When minted the mintage he shows clips on how it's done I find it interesting but like all shows over priced. Well we have a new Hoard. No not found in a field. Not colonial not Carson City. This one was found at the West Point Mint. Now the West point mint made coins for us before it became an official mint of our country. They are known for there quality concerning gold coins. Now I had not had my coffee yet. I see a wall of silver eagles and there talking about this hoard of 2016 Anniversary coins with the lettered edge. I said I have one of those. Not by a long shot. The hoard was from West Point. No your kidding I'm still asleep. Well they want want us to be to get in on this new rarity. Now there have been hoards before. I would say the Carson City mint was the largest and most important found.. It changed the prices on thousand of coins because on the mintage change it caused. A few years ago P.C.G.S. and coin world forced the Philadelphia mint through the freedom of informations act to disclose any silver eagles made there. They were caught good. Over 79,000 Eagles were made there. These of course cost a premium. Now back to West point. Tell me how this hoard in this day an age managed to be misplaced. Did I hear inventory? I doubt it. It seems they don't know we're these coins were stored. Now I could of bought one but at a premium. There calling the hoard of 2019. I call it making a killing before the year goes out.This is nothing but another created rarity. But were not supposed to know that. Yes I can buy one but I won't pay there price. And I don't want a special label. So the reason I wrote this is because I want to know what you think happened. How do you mix up these monster boxes that are sealed with the name on them.? I give up everything is just an oversight. Ok. Then sell them at the 2016 price and label. Never happen. They got us again. I'm really getting tired of writing about the mint. Doesn't matter which one. They should of melted them and leave the mintage were it was with Philly they knew they had them. I'm putting up the white flag. Be careful what you buy and have a great New Years. Here's a resolution for the mint. Quality Control. Thanks Mike

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28 Dec 2019

Christmas Coin Club finds

Coins | user_45311

My Christmas Coin Club gifts for the year: 2019 Silver Eagle, 1944S Washington Quarter, 1941P Walker, 1892 Columbia Comm. 1971 and 1972 Mint sets, Lincoln cent folder, 3 Barber dimes and a 1926 S Peace Dollar (not pictured) in VF+.

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