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17 Jan 2020

From The Classic Era of Commemoratives

| Just Mokie

Yesterday I visited my local coin shop to pick up some donations for the Kid Zone at our Pennsylvania Association of Numismatist Coin Show and HAD to leave with something for the Mokie Zone. I had my heart set on a California, Bay Bridge, or Texas commemorative half but saw this beautiful Columbia, South Carolina Sesquicentennial Half looking up at me and whispering "Mokie, Mokie, you know you want me, you know you NEED me". Like an Ancient Mariner passing an island of Sirens, I couldn't resist. So what are some of her many highlights? The Columbia SC Half was minted in 1936 at the Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco Mints. My example, from Philadelphia, had a total mintage of 9,007 while her sister coins in Denver and San Francisco had mintages of 8,007 and 8,009. At the time of release, a three coin set would set you back $6.45 while a single example was $2.15. Nowadays, the cost of any of the three mints is about the same, which seems logical given the similar mintage. The obverse features Liberty holding the Scales of Justice in her left hand and a drawn sword in her right hand. The Capitol Building in 1786 and the Capitol building in 1936 are at her sides. Liberty's face is rather masculine with a passing resemblance to Jesus' face on the Shroud of Turin. She appears to have her eyes closed for Blind Justice perhaps?The reverse depicts the State tree of South Carolina, the Palmetto, with two bunches of arrows and an oak branch at its base. This symbolism apparently alludes to a Revolutionary War Battle in which the British were unable to take Fort Moultrie because of its sturdy construction from Palmetto logs. There are also 13 stars representing the original colonies including South Carolina. The coin commemorates the 150th Anniversary of Columbia as the Capitol of South Carolina. As you can see in the map Columbia is centrally located within the state which must have been one of the considerations for her designation as the state capitol. The local celebration in Columbia occurred in March of 1936 but the coins did not appear until October. A total of 25,000 coins were authorized so the mintage split allowed for approximately 8,000 three coin sets and an extra thousand for more frugal collectors. 1936 Mokie would have probably been one of the frugal ones. LOL

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17 Jan 2020

The Twenty Cent Coin

Coins | user_25416

The twenty cent piece was one of the shortest-lived denominations produced by the U.S. Mint. It lasted from 1875 to 1878, inclusive. When the mint put this coin into circulation, they immediately found a problem with it: it had nearly the exact same design, weight, and lettering of the Seated Liberty quarter dollar, the twenty-five cent coin being produced at the time. Many people complained that “it was necessary to read on the coin to determine whether they were holding a 20 or 25 cent coin without a side by side comparison of the two” (Coin Collecting for Beginners). Then in 1878, by the decision of Congress, the twenty cent piece was abolished, making it one of the shortest lived denominations ever to circulate in the U.S..

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17 Jan 2020

New Zealand Bird Coins

Coins-World | user_1727

Ever since New Zealand was a British colony using the Pound Sterling, birds and other animals have been a repeated theme on the currency. This article explores some of those coins featuring a variety of birds…

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16 Jan 2020

Mistaken identity Slave Hire Badge in Standard Catalogue

Exonumia | user_66754

There is a case of mistaken identity in the Standard Catalogue of Hard Times Tokens, at the bottom of page 113. On the left is an image of a Servant Tag “HT 500, SERVANT, 1811 in toothed rectangle …” But the Diamond Shape tells us it can’t be an 1811 or it would be rectangular with scalloped corners with a LAFAR hallmark on the reverse. The most readily identified 1811 SERVANT badge is from the Stack’s Auction 1993 Lot No. 1167 of the John J. Ford Jr. Collection that had been damaged with the badge number broken off with the bottom third of the badge. The badge on page 113 of the Standard Catalogue is a John Mood SERVANT Badge 1841, (not 1811) as evidenced by the serrated border of the date which is referred to as the ‘toothed rectangle’ date. A Mood 1841 SERVANT would be: HT#500 R5. The Lafar 1811 SERVANT would be: HT#513 Rarity R6. Big difference.

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16 Jan 2020

The Soho Mint And Matthew Boulten

Tokens | Mike B

Hi everyone. Last week I wrote a blog on a very great token of a very important man in the history of the reign of King Henry the VIII. One of my favorites. Not really. Now.I figured I would write a blog on the famous Soho mint. Little did I know this went on for page after page covering all aspects of the mint. It has tremendous history. The Soho mint was officially opened in 1788. It was designed by Matthew Boultin. He had asked permission of King George the III . He was granted an opening ten years later in 1788. It's were these pieces of art in copper were made.. It's located in Handsworth West Midlands England. It has eight steam powered presses that would make 70 to 84 per hour. Big difference from today.. Now the presses were patented by Boultin himself.. In one of the pictures you can see the tokens or coins falling into the basket. Now before we go any further he did make coins for England. Spain and the people of the French revolution. He had the best die makers Britain had to offer. The token on the bottom of the mint was done by Peter Kempson.one of the many great die makers of his time.I can't list them all just to many. They made coins for the colonies as well Now with all kinds counterfeiting came in as a problem. Britain took up a great fight against this as did George the III. In one of the photos you can see Soho by the red line. Not very well but it's there. He used weights to capture these people and it worked. The counterfeiting was rampant during the the 1770 before the mentioned opened up. If you were caught you died that simple. In 1771 a woman was caught. She was hung outside the Newgate Prison another great token. After she was hung she was burned at the stake. Might be a good idea today.Well it's a small world. When I first started collecting these I was directed to one Bill Mckivor. This man studied them and would go to Britain to buy them. He has sold thousands. . Saw a token I liked he said send a check to me. Well a few days later I received my token. I didn't mail the check yet. He said don't worry I know I will get it . He helped me allot about these tokens. What I didn't know he was a very good friend of Richard G. Dick Doty . Senior Numismatic Curator at the Smithsonian institution. He passed away on the second of June2013. He also loved the tokens

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15 Jan 2020

Coin Thoughts #85 by "SUN"

Medals | "SUN"

THE OFFICIAL LYNDON B. JOHNSON INAUGURAL MEDAL

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15 Jan 2020

Series 471, Cigarette Case?

Exonumia | Haney

Numismatic collectables as you know can run the gambit of items from neck ties to glassware, but you want a puzzled look from your spouse just say you bought a cigarette case on eBay. So you are going to take up smoking now? Well no was my response, but it is really cool as it has a fictious series 471 note engraved on the outside of the case. At that point I wondered, out loud, if it would work as a business card holder as it is eye catching which ended with the comment you're cute. That is okay as I guess you need to be a little nuts to get excited about your latest MPC acquisition then again she may need to get her eyes checked saying I am cute.

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15 Jan 2020

Where Is Everyone?

Coins | Mike B

Hi everyone. All five of you. I have been going over the blogs that have been written. I counted the amount of comments left. I was shocked. Now this site is to share our knowledge on the coins ,token,and medals, of other collectors. The blogs were on a token, the mint various coins a nice mixture of blogs on different subjects. Now the people who write these do extensive research on such things as mintage, who made them when we're they made pictures that are an important part of a blog. I can understand the pre holiday season the holiday season. But we're into the 15 of January. Blogs have been written. No answers. I guess we have learned everything we need to know. I know people work kids are in school but that never stopped them before. At least leave a comment when one is written if one is written. The programs at the mint three comments. Really. If I sound I'm upset it's because I am a little. There was always blogs. People making friends. If this keeps up I'm afraid of what the ANA will do. When i write a blog it's about a coin or token I own. Or about the mint and situations like this. The few people writing them what's there incentive to write them if no one's going to read them. We can sit and stare at the same screen we had a week ago. Not even a thanks for writing I picked something up today. Or thanks for taking the time. Can someone please tell me what's going on?. Saturday and Sunday have been slow. But by Friday it's like the week end. Maybe three or four. I have been collecting now for twenty seven years. I'm still learning. I try to get something out of every blog. The day you think you know everything try stamps. The reason I write so many is I'm disabled. I have nothing but time . So I write . I say try one a.week. If two that's great. But let's get back on track. It should be an interesting year. Write about it. If you disagree with this blog comment on it. Tell me I'm wrong. This is what causes discussion. Believe me I have been wrong before I only hope I'm wrong now.. Thanks and let's write. I get my ink for the printer today so I will be writing again. Have a great day let's make this a great site. Mike.

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14 Jan 2020

The Jefferson W Nickels Will Be Highly Successful, Change My Mind!

| Just Mokie

As you are all probably aware by now, the U.S. Mint is going to release another trio of W mintmarked coins with their annual sets. To be specific, we are going to get a W Proof Jefferson Nickel, a W Reverse Proof Jefferson Nickel, and a W Uncirculated Jefferson Nickel in our annual sets. So was 2019 a success? Let's crunch the numbers:Clad Proof Set

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14 Jan 2020

1984 doubled ear found!

Coins | 1943penny

I recently found a doubled ear penny in a penny box! although It is not in great condition it is worth a lot of money! I havent found anything that good ever before! It has some dirt on it but looks like a "Fine" or "extra Fine". What would this be worth? Because the 2017 red book said ms65 was 230 dollars, is this true? discuss;

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