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15 Jul 2018

Affordable Poland Proba (Pattern) Coinage

| Well worn Copper

Poland has an interesting addition for collectors of their nation's coinage. Proba coins, or official patterns, are struck off by the government in limited quantities when the mint is considering coin designs. Proba coinage can be a proposed regular issue or even commemoratives. Mintages typically run anywhere from 15,000 to 33,000, and all patterns are struck "proba". While this is much more than we are used to concerning U.S. pattern coinage, Poland caters to the collector and offers something very different. Proba's are comparative to our modern commemorative mintages, and just as interesting. I'd like to see the U.S. Mint offer a modern pattern in limited, but affordable, mintage for collectors someday. The history of U.S. pattern coinage has been mired in technical legalities and government seizures, and is sadly out of reach for the average collector. While you won't get wealthy from collecting Proba's, you will find diversity and enjoyment, which is sometimes what numismatics is all about.

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14 Jul 2018

Book Review For The Coin Collector's Survival Manual, Revised Seventh Edition.

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

The author of the book, Scott A. Travers, (former ANA vice president) creates a book full of pointers and tips on making money off coins, avoiding counterfeit coins, graded coins, buying, selling, and more throughout the book. Over the coarse of the book, Scott helps the reader identify safe and secure transactions versus risky and dangerous buys. He well states the benifts of grading coins, and informs the reader on making profit through the "crack-out game". Content on the history of grading is also included. The book explains ways to get the best deals when buying, and getting the most money when selling a collection. Scott places forth his experienced knowledge on the gold and silver market as well as a simple United States and Canada silver coin melt value chart. This book gets four and a half stars. The Coin Collector's Survival Manual, Revised Seventh Edition is a book to go back to refer to at every step in a coin collector's journey. I would recommend this book to other people.

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14 Jul 2018

Book Review For Adventure Across The States National Park Quarters

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

In my opinion, this book does a fantastic job in covering base numismatic knowledge in less than one hundred pages. The start of the book well explains coin history, grading, proper storage, fundamental terminology, and types of coins in just few pages. A non collector could pick up the book and could know just as much as an average collector. The book than goes into the one thing some coin collecting pass over. The history. The author then goes into detail explaining why each national park is special, and all the historical action that has taken place at each one. Each national park is summarized up oustandly well in the few words written to describe for many, speechless places. It then continues on to give information about online clubs for beginners to join. I think this book deserves five stars because of all that was accomplished in this short, informative, and useful book. I believe it summarized each national park outstandingly well insuch few words. This book was an amazing numismatic read.

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14 Jul 2018

Dwight D. Eisenhower the Numismatist

Coins | DrDarryl

I'm sharing a write-up that I just drafted that should provide insight that Dwight D. Eisenhower was a numismatist at heart and that he donated his coin collection to the Smithsonian Institution in 1958 (while still actively serving his second term as the 34th President of the United States).

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13 Jul 2018

Cryptocurrency

| Big Nub Numismatics

As currency and economics change each day, people have to cope with it. In 2009, an anonymous creator and software developer named, Satoshi Nakamoto, designed Bitcoin. Many people think that the price of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrency is just in a bubble, and in recent news many people have been using its anonymous, decentralized banking network properties for illegal stuff like buying drugs. The U.S. government has set governing laws about using bitcoin, and the U.S. government has also seized its opportunity to steal from its citizens even more by "seizing" their bitcoins. China has banned trading bitcoin, making a very hostile thing to own. t is sort of like the 1933 St.Gaudens Gold Double-Eagles. Bitcoin is a currency unlike anything we have seen so far. It has no central bank, and the people control it. It uses an encrypted blockchain, which almost ensures its safety. Although nothing is always safe. Bitcoin is currently over 6,000 USD, and is at a slight decline after 2017 and 2018 had a sharp incline in pricing when it hit over 19,000 USD. Cryptocurrencies give a new side to numismatics, because cryptocurrency is still currency. I have begun collecting cryptocurrencies this past week. I currently have some dogecoins, and some very low fractions of bitcoin. This can be a fun, and interesting way to collect, and maybe even get a profit, just like "regular numismatics. You could build a type set, and find as many types of this new currency as you can. Many websites offer digital wallets so you can store them. I have found it quite fun to collect these along with my U.S. currency. You can sign up for free bit faucets, and doge faucets, offering you another fun way to collect for free. Some websites like these are at the bottom if you would like to try, just copy and paste the address in anew tab. How knows what the future of numismatics holds next? Checks, only order, credit and debit cards, and now cryptocurrency. It is all part of the history of numismatics. Many books are out on this subject, like another book in the "for dummies" book series titled Bitcoin for Dummies by Prypto, or John Wiley and Sons. There are many opportunities out there. I wish you all the best!

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13 Jul 2018

Lothian Edienbough D&H 1 1796 Water Purifier

Tokens | Mike 271

Hi everyone. Today's token is about something we all need to live. Water. Since the beginning of mankind we have been looking for the substance to survive cook wash sanitary reasons just about everything. But the more people the more bacteria filthy water there is. It's a natural process that happens everyday. In England the famous Thames river was basically an open sewer. Most of the industries were built on the banks and dumped there waste. It goes on today still. Not on the Thames.

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12 Jul 2018

Ideas #1-5 For The ANA

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

2) Online Library.Sadly, many people don't live close enough to use the American Numismatic Association library on a regular basis. Members are spread out all over the country. As they have made it possible for books to be shipped, today's prices of mailing items are extremely pricey. An online library will be used by all members, regardless of location. Through the online library,books could be borrowed from planes, car trips, or on a regular day anywhere. It would let all Young Numismatics the chance to have a book to review for YN dollars too.

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11 Jul 2018

Taste of coins

Coins-United States | CoinLady

Went downtown today, for Taste of Chicago. On the way up, I passed my favorite coin shop. Had to get a glimpse of the windows before my lunch.

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11 Jul 2018

Better Exploring National Coin Week

National Coin Week | user_86205

Personally, National Coin Week is my favorite section of the year that the American Numismatic Association hosts. Why? It is an enjoyable week of club bonding, rich history, and intriguing online trivia. It is also fun to compete in the writing contest as well as completing the youth activity. Let's take a better look at ways to get envolved when National Coin Week comes around.

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10 Jul 2018

Small start to a currency collection

| The Paginator

This June I got to go to the Currency Show in Kansas City. As I wrote in my last blog post I was trying to start a currency collection so that is one reason me and my family went. To start of my collection with some paper money that wasn’t too expensive, I bought a five dollar red seal series 1953 A. I also bought Disney dollars while I was at the show although they aren’t for my currency collection necessarily I bought them for a display I am going to do on Disney dollars soon.The main reason I chose the red seal five dollar bill to start my collection was because I already had one that someone gave me but it wasn’t in very good condition so I got an almost uncirculated one. It’s a lot nicer to look at than a wrinkled one!

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