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01 Jan 2021

The First Nickel, the Shield Nickel

Coins | CoinHunter

Todays blog is about the Shield Nickel.The act of May 16, 1866 authorized a new five cent coin made of 25% nickel and 75% copper. This created the unusual situation where two coins of the same value circulated at the same time (the other coin being the Half Dime). A massive quantity of nearly 15 million "Nickels" was produced in the first year, partly to promote the new coin and partly because of the availability of nickel and copper compared to the higher cost of silver for Half Dimes.the first versions of the new Nickel had rays on the reverse, between the stars surrounding the large 5 in the center of the coin. These extra elements caused the coinage dies to fail early because of the extra pressure needed to strike the nickel alloy and to force the metal into the recesses of the dies. To correct this problem, mint officials ordered the removal of the rays in mid-1867, creating two varieties: With Rays and No Rays, both of which you will need for a type set. Striking problems persisted, resulting in a series of coins noted for inconsistent strikes and lots of die cracks.Thanks for reading my blog and have a happy new year!-Source: PCGS CoinFactsPhoto courtesy of PCGS

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16 Apr 2019

I Am Honored

Medals | coinsbygary

Sorry folks no image this time! It just doesn't seem quite appropriate for this post. You see, today I have accidently discovered that one of my writings was linked on the website of a national humanitarian organization!

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17 Feb 2019

Learn Your Types: Standing Liberty Quarters

Coins-United States | iccoins

Last week I acquired a new 1923 Standing Liberty Quarter to add to my collection, which is what inspired me to write this blog. Designed by Hermon MacNeil, this is one of the most popular coin designs for collectors. The prices of these coins are generally much higher than other coins minted in the same time-period. The overall mintage of the Standing Liberty Quarter series is much lower than the popular Mercury Dimes and Buffalo Nickels. From 1916 to 1924, the dates wore off much sooner than any of the details. This is because the date is the highest part on early date Standing Liberty Quarters. This led to extreme difficulties for grading companies, like PCGS and NGC, as well as collectors and dealers. There is essentially only one that that is required to grade coins. That is that the coin must be identifiable by year, denomination, series, variety, etc. Unfortunately, many of the earlier Standing Liberty Quarters ended up “ungradable.” Coins that may normally be a good, or sometimes even a very good example, may be ungradable simply because of the lack of the date. From 1925 to 1930, the date was recessed, which was very beneficial. The coins weigh 6.25 grams and are composed of 90% silver and 10% copper.

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27 Jan 2019

Learn Your Types: Two-Cent

Coins-United States | iccoins

The two-cent piece, minted from 1864 to 1873 was a short-lived and currently obsolete denomination from the US Mint. It was one of the shortest-lived denominations and issue of any United States coin. Around this time, the Mint was creating two-cent pieces and three-cent pieces, with the nickel three-cent coin replacing the silver design in 1865, one year after the first year of the two-cent piece. Just after the conclusion of the two-cent piece in 1873, the Mint began minting another popular obsolete denomination, the twenty-cent piece. This type was incredibly short lived, concluding in 1878, just 3 years after its introduction. Around this time, the US Mint seemed to have been obsessed with creating several different denominations until finally settling in on what you generally use today. The mintages of the two-cent coins started out strong, but dwindled down every year and 1873 was a proof-only year. The coin was designed by James Longacre and weighted 6.22 grams, double the weight of the bronze Indian Head Cent, also designed by Longacre and released the same year. The coin was composed of 95% copper, plus a5% tin and zinc combination. These coins, with a diameter of 23 millimeters are slightly larger than small cents. All two-cent pieces were minted at the Philadelphia Mint.

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18 Jan 2019

Choose Your Realm

Coins | iccoins

There are countless different coins any collector can collect. Therearetons of options for US coins, world coins, ancient coins, and even currency and tokens. You need to choose what you want to collect to allow you to be the happiest collector you can be. I already did an article about this for the types of sets you can collect, but you don’t even have to go into a set, but rather, collect something that fits you that may not even be a traditional route. The following are some important things to consider before starting a collection. Even if you’ve been collecting for years, you can always change it up and collect something different.

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10 Jan 2019

Don't Get Robbed!

Coins | iccoins

Update: Unfortunately, my computer broke and I haven’t been able to write articles in a while.

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23 Dec 2018

Learn Your Types: Presidential Dollars

Coins-United States | iccoins

Because of my busy week this past week, you get to read two articles in one day, this along with my article about details grades.

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