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24 Aug 2016

Franklin Hladf Dollars

| ShriekenGriffon

Today, I have decided to talk about Benjamin Franklin half dollars since that is one of the main things I collect. I’m sure most of you know what they look like but I will do a quick description: the obverse portrays Franklin and the reverse has the Liberty Bell on it along with a nearly miniscule eagle to satisfy the requirement at the time that half dollars had to depict an eagle. “Franklin might have been more upset at the reverse design: as numismatic writer Jonathan Tepper noted, ‘Had Benjamin Franklin known that he would be appearing on a half dollar with an eagle, he most likely would have been quite upset. He detested the eagle, and numismatic lore has it that he often referred to it as a scavenger. Given the practical man that he was, Franklin proposed the wild turkey as our national bird.’" I found this quote to be funny while still relating to the topic.

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21 Aug 2016

Info About Robet Scot

Coins | user_94464

Hi, well look at large cents, I was impressed by the beautifuldraped bust design by Robert Scot. I was wondering if anyone could tell me about his life/work.

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19 Aug 2016

US Mint Releases vs. Other World Mints

Coins-World | user_9943

Recently I havebeen looking around at the Canadian mint and other world mints. I noticed that the Canadian mint had hundreds of different coins, many colorized. Many of them were under $100 dollars, which isn't cheap, but also,not super, super expensive. I was wondering why the US mint didn't release close to as many different coins as the Canadian mint. I decided to look at other world mints to see the spread of their coinage. First, I paid the Perth mint a visit. I found a wide array of coins. Many of them colorful. Personally, I like both colored and uncolored coins, and think theUS mint should release both. I also visited the Australian mint (online), and noticed quite a large amount of designs. These are just two other mints I looked at, and I would like to hearyour opinion on the matter. I hope the US mint starts ramping upthe amount of designs it makes this coming few years.

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18 Aug 2016

My Trip to the World's Fair of Money

World's Fair of Money | World_Coin_Nut

This year I made my first ever trip to the ANA’s World’s Fair of Money. I had been anticipating it for months, ever since booking my flight. I had an incredible time and my wallet is showing the affects. I wanted to share my experience with everyone in a short diary. Hopefully you will enjoy it.

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18 Aug 2016

The Aluminum Cent

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

As I have illustrated in other articles (“The Elimination of the Cent”, April 16th, 2016) the cent denomination is costlier to make than its face value of one cent. This means that the government loses money for each cent made.The United States Mint has experimented with other materials to make the cent out of to save money. The 1974 Aluminum Cent is one of these such pattern pieces. This cent has since been the subject of a controversial case and many discussions about the legality of certain coins, such as the 1933 Saint-Gaudens double eagle and 1913 Liberty Head Nickel.

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18 Aug 2016

Swedish Plate Money

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

Throughout history, many items have been used as currency that appear drastically different than modern day coinage. One such example is the Swedish plate currency. These mediums of exchange are large rectangular sheets of copper with impressions on them. They were used for money for many years after a war put the country in an unfortunate place.

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18 Aug 2016

Bullion

Coins | Mike Burn

I don't know if this picture will appear as one. Believe me I have tried. The coin is also a two ounce rendition of Mount Rushmore. I will not endorse the mint I don't do that. If the picture does appears and you like it it is easy to find. Why did I buy this coin? To be quite honest with you I liked it. I'm not a silver stacker but if that's what you like there is nothing wrong with it. This bullion was made here in the U.S.A. And the relief is very high. So high the rim is a high one it to protect the detail's

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18 Aug 2016

The 1952 West Point USMA Sesquincentenial Medal

Medals | coinsbygary

Over her long and distinguished career Laura Gardin Fraser had a very cordial relationship with the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York. Both Frasers loved America and the Armed Forces of the United States. Many of their military related commissions not only included medallic art, but also full size sculptures and smaller bronzes. There are three significant works Mrs. Fraser completed for The United States Military Academy. The first is a 1952 bronze medal commemorating the sesquicentennial of the USMA. Struck by the Medallic Art Corporation, this medal was presented to the parents of the cadets who entered the academy that year. A small insert reads, “A memento of the United States Military Academy to the parents or guardians of the cadets who entered the Military Academy in the Sesquicentennial Year”. The medal’s obverse displays the flaming torch of leadership, the sword of valor, and a laurel wreath representing victory. The reverse emphasizes the United States Military Academy Coat of Arms set underneath a rising sun. Across the face of the Union Shield is a sword and the helmet of Pallas Athena. Athena is associated with the arts of war and her helmet represents wisdom and learning. Perched atop the shield is a bald eagle clutching a bundle of 13 arrows and a scroll. The scroll bears the academy’s motto, “Duty, Honor, Country” and the words, “West Point, MDCCCII (1802) USMA. In front of the eagle’s right wing is an oak branch signifying strength and on the left an olive branch signifying peace. [1] [2] Laura Gardin Fraser’s next work for the United States Military Academy was the 1957 Sylvanus Thayer medal. This medal exhibits a profile bust of Sylvanus Thayer on its obverse and the coat of arms on the reverse. The Sylvanus Thayer medal is awarded annually by the USMA Association of Graduates to an outstanding citizen who in service to America exemplifies the USMA values of duty, honor, and country. Sylvanus Thayer known as the “father of the Military Academy” served as the United States Military Academy’s Superintendent from 1817 until 1833. Under his leadership the USMA became a pioneering engineering school whose graduates were largely responsible for the construction of the nations initial rail lines, bridges, harbors, and roads. [3] [4] Laura Gardin Fraser once said that, “A sculptors life is measured in large chunks of time.” Three 9x4 bronze relief panels chronicling almost five centuries of American history represents one of those large chunks of time in Mrs. Fraser’s life. The following is quoted in an interview with Dean Krakel concerning the aforementioned panels, “I began this project making little vignettes of historical figures in clay. We seem to know so little about American history, and so having begun this in 1935, I began to accumulate an interesting collection. I started doing events from history and animals purely American like—the skunk. Then I started sorting and organizing my figures in chronological order, placing them on large tablets. These became like the leaves of a book. This essentially is how I started the project. For a long time I thought I was doing them for love of my country, as no one or institution seemed interested.” Eventually, the United States Military Academy took an interest in Mrs. Fraser’s panels and they were cast into bronze. Then finally in 1964 after nearly 30 years, they were unveiled at the dedication of the Academy’s new library in the portico of the library’s entrance. The first panel begins with the exploration of Leif Ericson and extends all the way through to the Declaration of Independence and Revolutionary War. The second panel includes westward expansion, the development of American political parties, and the Mexican, Civil, and Indian Wars. Panel three illustrates industrial development, modern inventions, labor unions, the depression, the World Wars, and the atomic bomb. [5] 1 The United States Military Academy West Point, http://www.usma.edu/news/sitepages/coat %20of%20arms%20and%20motto.aspx 2 Medal Commemorates West Point Sesquicentennial by Fred Reed 10/4/99, http:// www.pcgs.com/News/Medal-Commemorates-West-Point-Sesquicentennial 3 The United States Military Academy West Point, http://www.usma.edu/wphistory/SitePages/ Home.aspx 4 Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvanus_Thayer_Award 5 End of the Trail, The Odyssey of a Statue by Dean Krakel

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