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23 Jun 2018

TABARISTAN RULER UMAR A.D. .771-780

Coins | Mike Burns

Hi everyone. Well I have been working on this blog for a week. It's the hardest I ever did trying to cut down on all the history associated with this famous hoard. Why? Well there are twenty different maps and at least twenty different countries involved in this famous trade route that connected China to Constantinople and Europe. It was called the famous Silk Road. That was easy silk worms grew everywhere around this trade route and we know the importance of silk. But everything was traded name it they traded it . I'm serious every country had something to trade and individual traders also.

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23 Jun 2018

American Constitution Coins

Coins | user_58984

In 1987 I bought a set of the Bicentenary of the American Constitution coin set that was minted by the Pobjoy Mint in the Isle of Mann. It of course was minted out of the country because it had Ronald Regan on the coin while he was the sitting President.

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22 Jun 2018

The Very "Clashy" Flying Eagle Cents

Coins | user_37612

Many people love Flying Eagle cents. The first of the small cents, and minted right before the civil war in midst of political uproar. Following the coinage legislation of 1857, Spanish coins and large cents were to be melted, and exchanged for the new Flying Eagle small cent. A wonderful design from James B. Longacre. The large cents with the rise of copper prices could barely make a profit. This, and the longing for U.S. currency to be the only currency used in America was the breaking point.  This act was a turning point in America's financial independence. The flying eagle is quite interesting, with its 1856 proofs, undated examples, and strong strikes. Most interestingly though were the die clashes.In 1857, the new Flying Eagle cent had some problems  bumping into  other coins. Three different varieties of a clash with this new cent have been recorded, one with a seated liberty quarter, one with a seated liberty half-dollar, and one with a double eagle.  I have only personally seen one of these, and it blew my mind how something like this could have happened. I think this is second in curiosity only to "mule" coins.The die clash with the quarter is very prominent along the reverse, and is known as FS-01-1857-901, or snow-8 1857. Coins with these die closes are prized, as only 81-106 are known to exist. This variety graded as MS-63BN can be worth $2,750. The 1857, obverse 50 cent clash is the most available, having a rarity of URS-11, of these die clashes, with an estimated 258-512 being made. Not exceedingly rare, compared with others, but is immensely hard to find. Most examples are almost exactly centered within the half-dollar, making it look like this "mistake" was intentional. The rarest, and most worn, are the 1857, obverse $20 clash. Having a rarity of URS-7, these are hard to find. These gold double-eagles have their busts interrupted by the mirrored flying-eagle design. About 50-75 of these exist. None are known to be above mint state, but one, if found, it could fetch over $15,000. These examples cannot be missed, every one of these are clearly punched by the flying eagle, and the one cent. Most of the partnered cents that show the die clash are not very clear. Only seen in the fields of the design is the information. You can easily miss the shallow seated liberty, and double-eagle design, they look somewhat like a break in the die. The way each example is oriented makes me think that this was not a mistake. The designs are almost perfectly placed together, making even more odd. Whoever was in charge of these did not do a good job, but I thank for this. Without this "mistake" these would never have been able to exist. 

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21 Jun 2018

Liberty Head Dime One Hundred Anniversary Gold 2016

Coins | Mike Burns

Hi Everyone hope all is well. Today I will write about a coin that needs no introduction. The Anniversary Liberty Head Dime or as most call it the Mercury dime because of the resemblance of Mercury. This will be short because I just received it. As usual there was the uproar at the mint why sell rolls. I don't know if that was answered. I would think the more who could afford one the better. Any way water under the bridge. I will try a paragraph to make this easy to read.

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20 Jun 2018

The Kennedy Penny

Coins | user_37612

 After the assassination of president John F. Kennedy, the numismatic world lit up. A great president must be remembered on some kind of coin, like the Lincoln cent. That's exactly what they proposed, a cent coin with Kennedy on the obverse, and a tree design adapted from a 1915 commemorative quarter for the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Production was underway, galvanic were made, and models were prepared, until an interesting article from Coinworld showed up from Q.David Bowers. He found that, although the most circulated denomination, the penny could not buy anything itself except a Disney peep-show, a stamp, and a gumball. He though that people wouldn't appreciate that coin as much for Kennedy as it should, so instead they made the altered design on the largest circulating denomination, the half-dollar. I personally like the design for the reverse of the kenned-penny better than the half-dollar, but it still show the likeness of one of our most beloved presidents.

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19 Jun 2018

1883-O MORGAN DOLLAR

Coins | Longstrider

   Today what I would like to be doing is standing in the air conditioned store of my coin dealer with a load of cash in my little hot hand and my wife/conscience not there to rein me in. That’s not going to happen so I am going to show you all the last coin I purchased from him. Below is my 1883-O Morgan Dollar. It is rated as an MS 64. If the pictures show it, you can see it has an unusually strong strike on the reverse. The eagles breast is high with lots of feather definition. Not usually the case from the new Orleans mint. If you have been kind enough to have read some of my past blogs, you will now I am drawn to Peace and Morgan dollars with nice toning. The reverse of this specimen has red, gold and blue on it. It appears another coin was laying across it giving it the crescent moon look. A favorite of mine. The colors, mostly the blue, are starting to come across onto the obverse. Mostly present across the date and some of the lettering on top with the entire obverse has a light golden tone.

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19 Jun 2018

The Old Man of the Mountain.

Coins | user_37612

 State quarters were a great hit among the public when they first appeared. At the height, over 120 million people collected this series, but this immediately died off after 2009. We've all seen the New Hampshire coin, minted in 2000. The coin's obverse has an inscription on the side of the mountain, Old Man of the Mountain. No big deal right? On May 3, 2003 this stone structure collapsed, leaving the New Hampshire state quarter the best history lesson in the series. This formation was a series of cliff edges made of granite along Cannon Mountain. It is reported to be formed by the process of water erosion from thawing and freezing. Found in 1805, many explorers thought this protrusion of rock looked like god himself. As the state symbol, it was a hard hit for the people of New Hampshire. This just goes to show how coins can be some of the last remaining pictures of an object. Maybe in 200 years someone will find this coin and find out the lost history of it in the far future.

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19 Jun 2018

They do notice

Coins-United States | CoinLady

Quite a successful bookstore day yesterday! Went to my first store and made a few good finds. When I paid for my items, in cash, I got a handful of bright new 2018-D cents. I commented on how much I like the new coins.

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18 Jun 2018

What's my Coin? 1646 Ducat - real or fake? Anyone know? Worth?

Coins - World | T.

Received this coin with  an inheritance of many other coins - can anyone direct me to more info? Can anyone also indicate what factors I'd look for to know if it's fake or real?  Thanks in advance!

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