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27 Aug 2016

The Colombian Exposition Half Dollar

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

Recently, hundreds of commemorative coins are produced in the United States, whether they are the newest National Parks quarters, the 2016 Mark Twain commemorative coin, or a Native American Dollar. The coin that started all of this, however, is not well known by anyone but coin collectors. This coin is the Columbian Exposition Half Dollar.

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27 Aug 2016

The NYU Hall of Fame for Great Americans Medals

Medals | coinsbygary

The New York University Hall of Fame for Great Americans is a 630 foot outdoor colonnade featuring the sculpted busts of 98 out of the 102 honorees elected into it. The Hall of Fame was conceived by Dr. Henry Mitchell MacCracken, (Chancellor of New York University from 1891 to 1910) and was formally dedicated on May 30, 1901. The Hall of Fame for Great Americans currently stands on the campus of the Bronx Community College. (New York University closed due to financial difficulties in 1973). [1] [2] The first of its kind in America, the inspiration for the hall is explained by the following paragraph copied directly from the Mary Lyon Medal COA: The spirit of The Hall of Fame is reflected in the following lines from the Old Testament: “Let us now praise famous men, by whom the Lord hath wrought great glory....All these were honored in their generations, and were the glory of their times...” Carved in stone on the pediments of The Hall of Fame are the words: “By wealth of thought, or else by mighty deed, They served mankind in noble character. In worldwide good they live forevermore.” Mary Lyon (1797-1849) served as an educator and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1905. A pioneer in higher education for women, Mary Lyon opened the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary (now College). The original curriculum included mathematics, English, science, philosophy and Latin. Under her guidance and with her constant labor, the school gained a national reputation for its enlightened curriculum and high academic standards, a reputation maintained to this day. [3] The practice of issuing accompanying medals for the Hall of Fame honorees came about through a coalition between New York University, the National Sculpture Society to oversee and approve the designs, the Medallic Art Company to manufacture the medals, and the Coin and Currency Institute to market them. A full page add in the October 1962 issue of “The Numismatist” introduced the 1 3/4 inch medals for sale in either silver or bronze. Issued at a rate of about one or two per month, the issue price of the silver medal was $14 while the bronze medal sold for $3. The program which began in 1962 ended in 1974 with 96 medals created by 42 sculptors. In addition to the smaller silver and bronze medals, there were also larger 3 inch bronze medals available for purchase. The success of the Hall of Fame medal program was due in part to the art director at the Medallic Art Company, Julius Lauth. Julius knew which sculptors identified with the theme of each medal and as a result the commission for the medals was first offered to the sculptor who had completed the bronze bust on the colonnade. Therefore, since Laura Gardin Fraser did the bust of Mary Lyon in 1927, she got the commission for the accompanying medal. Mrs. Fraser completed the sketches for the Mary Lyon Medal and had them approved by the by the art committee before her death on August 14, 1966. [3] [4] [5] At Mrs. Fraser’s death, Julius Lauth assigned sculptor Karl Gruppe to finish the models for the Mary Lyon medal based on the sketches done by Mrs. Fraser. Karl Gruppe, an associate of Laura Gardin Fraser in her Art Students League days was chosen to complete the medal because his artistic style was similar to that of Mrs. Fraser’s. [4] The following is a description taken from the 1967 dated Mary Lyon Medal COA: “The obverse is a fine classical profile portrait of Miss Lyon; the reverse is a typical scene depicting her continuing role as an educator, and is a capsule story of her dedicated life”. Over her long career as a sculptor, I find it interesting that Laura Gardin Fraser was equally capable of designing medals that were feminine in nature as is the Mary Lyon medal and masculine as is the obverse of the Oregon Trail commemorative. Of certainty, Laura Gardin Fraser was a truly remarkable sculptor. 1 Bronx Community College, http://www.bcc.cuny.edu/halloffame/ 2 Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hall_of_Fame_for_Great_Americans 3 Mary Lyon Medal COA 4 Medalblog, Hall of Fame Series - The Most Successful Medal Program by D. Wayne Johnson, December 3, 2012 5 Hall of Fame at New York University Medal Series by D. Wayne Johnson 2004, Medal Collectors of America; http://www.medalcollectors.org/Guides/HFGA/HFGA.html

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27 Aug 2016

The Three Dollar Gold Piece

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

In the history of United States coinage, many odd denominations have been made for one reason or another. The three dollar gold coin is one of these denominations. It was created for a similar reason as the three cent coin, for use in buying postage stamps, but overall was not well received by the public. This denomination, however unsuccessful at the time, has become a sought-after series, and has multiple major rarities within it.

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27 Aug 2016

NGC And I

Tokens | Mike Burn

Hi everyone! I am writing this blog to inform you of an on going discussion with NGC. Many ago a sent a British token to NGC for certification. Well it came back like none other in my twenty three years of submitting coins and token's. It came back in plastic and said ineligible type genuine. Not improperly cleaned or details. It's uncirculated and doesn't have a mark on it.

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25 Aug 2016

COIN THOUGHTS #3 from "SUN"

Coins | "SUN"

I have been doing an unscientific study of the two cent pieces. I feel the two cent pieces would compliment the Indian Cents as a collectible series,both were designed by James Longacre.

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24 Aug 2016

Franklin Hladf Dollars

| ShriekenGriffon

Today, I have decided to talk about Benjamin Franklin half dollars since that is one of the main things I collect. I’m sure most of you know what they look like but I will do a quick description: the obverse portrays Franklin and the reverse has the Liberty Bell on it along with a nearly miniscule eagle to satisfy the requirement at the time that half dollars had to depict an eagle. “Franklin might have been more upset at the reverse design: as numismatic writer Jonathan Tepper noted, ‘Had Benjamin Franklin known that he would be appearing on a half dollar with an eagle, he most likely would have been quite upset. He detested the eagle, and numismatic lore has it that he often referred to it as a scavenger. Given the practical man that he was, Franklin proposed the wild turkey as our national bird.’" I found this quote to be funny while still relating to the topic.

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21 Aug 2016

Info About Robet Scot

Coins | user_94464

Hi, well look at large cents, I was impressed by the beautifuldraped bust design by Robert Scot. I was wondering if anyone could tell me about his life/work.

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19 Aug 2016

US Mint Releases vs. Other World Mints

Coins-World | user_9943

Recently I havebeen looking around at the Canadian mint and other world mints. I noticed that the Canadian mint had hundreds of different coins, many colorized. Many of them were under $100 dollars, which isn't cheap, but also,not super, super expensive. I was wondering why the US mint didn't release close to as many different coins as the Canadian mint. I decided to look at other world mints to see the spread of their coinage. First, I paid the Perth mint a visit. I found a wide array of coins. Many of them colorful. Personally, I like both colored and uncolored coins, and think theUS mint should release both. I also visited the Australian mint (online), and noticed quite a large amount of designs. These are just two other mints I looked at, and I would like to hearyour opinion on the matter. I hope the US mint starts ramping upthe amount of designs it makes this coming few years.

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