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28 May 2017

I Once Wrote a Blog Saying I will Never Reach Ten Thousand Points

Coins | Mike Burn

Hi everyone! When I first found my way here to this Mecca of the coin world I saw points. Didn't know what they were about and I didn't like them. I said to myself this can turn into a game. I would never get points the way I saw them adding up. So I called and asked what they were about. I was told it showed your involvement in this wonderful program. Everyone knows how I feel so we will not address this topic anymore. Most of you know my condition. I was told to read blogs and very short stories. I did that. I became so interested in what others had to say it actually worked for awhile. Learned so much  I had to take notes. I started to write  blogs. I was told this is how we share and learn. Well about four months or so ago my friend said your number is  whatever. I said how did this happen? I wasn't pleased. But I said if I'm learning and sharing and helping others that's why I'm here. Well I received bad news. Read some in the morning and stretch it out. I did that. Unknown to me the points added up. Some tried to follow the blogs I was reading. But I get up early and by the time the rest of the world work up  they would fall of my activity page. I'm here because I like collecting coins and learning how others do it. I am so grateful to all of you who have taken time to write them. I have increased the amount of my friends and those who follow me. This is a great benefit of this program. Yes I did pass ten thousand points based on my way not others. I jumped in with both feet. And I was the one who benefited by it. So did the others by my comments. Some of my comments don't agree with the blog. That's fine. I found speaking how you feel is very important. Don't deceive those who wrote something wrong or they will continue to believe it. Not all my suggestions or recommendations are right either. But I would hope someone tells me. I wrote this so others would do things the same way. Not exactly my way but how there comfortable in doing it. That's the hobby how you see it and how you learn. We each have our style that's what makes this program so great. Now I have slowed down considerably and it upsets me. It means things are getting worse. My reading has slowed. I have a list of blog on coins i hope to write them. If I can do this so can you. Write a blog read more help your selves and others. Does this sound familiar yes because I believe in it. I try to explain just by following the program you will do very well. The ANA has a ten point program on how to write blogs. I followed it was I surprised. Many of you don't know it but I have learned so much from you it's unbelievable. I thank you for that. I thank the ANA who gives so freely of this program to make us better collectors. Every so often i go thru the list of those I follow. If they don't have any contributions in a certain period of time I drop them. There not doing anyone any good. Themselves or others. When I follow someone I want to see how active they are. If there not I have others who are.  Those I follow. Those I learn from. I see coins from all over the world. Where else can you do that and have fun. Here at the ANA. Thanks for taking time to read this. I hope I helped. If you disagree write it so I will know. Nothing here is personal. We're all here for the same reasons. Take care Mike.

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28 May 2017

Edibles as Currency

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

One of the most common types of barter items are edible items. Everybody needs food to survive, and it is one thing that everybody needs to buy and trade for, so it has entered our exchange system quite often throughout history. The three that will be focused on in this article are bread, seasonings and tea.

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28 May 2017

Furs and Skins as Currency

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

The earliest currency was not metal or paper, as the currency we typically use today is. In ancient times, before the invention of the coin by Lydia, the medium of trade used was much more practical for them. The currency used then was usually the fur or skin of an animal that was hunted. These basic currencies were so effective that they did not, generally, fade away as currency until the late 18th century.

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27 May 2017

Coinage of the Indian Nation of Lakota (present-day USA)

| Well worn Copper

Something that is always interesting to me has been the coinage of short-lived, micro, or "questionable" nations. For many U.S. collectors, the Indian nation of Lakota should whet your appetite. The Independent Nation of Lakota was declared in 2007 and its borders fill several existing western states in the USA. They have an interesting website which explains their cause and why they reputiate all former Indian treaties made with the US government. As for the coinage, it consists of half and one ounce bullion rounds in copper, silver and gold.  The copper 1 ounce round (pictured) has a face value of two dollars and is dated 2010.  Another website (www.freelakotabank.com) explains how its value is established on something known as the "open currency exchange".  The Open Currency Exchange is apparently against fiat money and favors hard specie. Copper coins can be found on eBay for $3-5, and are about the size of a U.S. silver dollar. No information about mintages is given, nor the private (?) mint which struck them. Couldn't find any slabbed on NGC either. Still, an interesting coin, and inexpensive too. Can't beat that!  I found out about the Lakota Nation in a book titled "An Atlas Of Countries That Don't Exist," by author Nick Middleton and published in 2015.  The book is a great read, and I discover several other "countries" in it that have issued coinage as well. Collecting coins such as these can add a whole new niche to your collection. 

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27 May 2017

Was THIS South Korean Coin Partly Responsible for the 1960 Lincoln Cent Small Date/Large Date Varieties?

Coins | user_61654

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27 May 2017

"Gold" Movie starring Matthew McConaughey

| Well worn Copper

Recently viewed the 2016 film "Gold" on DVD, and it was pretty interesting. The film revolves around Kenny Wells, a 3rd generation gold miner played by actor Matthew McConaughey and takes place in the late 1980's. While no gold coins or bullion is ever featured, the movie relates how difficult is can be to mine the yellow metal. Wells goes from boom to bust quite a few times while searching for financing to set up a dig in South America. A lot of McConaughey's character can also be seen in the TV show "Gold Rush," where miners struggle and hustle to catch a buck.  Always interesting to see the difficult journey gold makes from the ground to a coin. Personally, I'd rather stick with my day job. McConaughey plays his part well, and is always entertaining, even shaving his head and putting on 40 pounds for the part. 

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25 May 2017

Our First Student-Members-Only Auction

Young Numismatists Exchange | Dave_75466

The Legacy Knights Numismatic Society ended the school year by holding its first annual student-members-only auction, which turned out to be a rousing success!The idea came about when I was pondering how to fairly distribute donated items among our student members.  The donated reference books went to our school library to create a numismatic reference section.  That way they are always available during the school year, not only for our Society members, but also the rest of the student body, as a way of perpetuating awareness of our numismatic group.But what about the other donated items?  We have 13 members; what would we do with something that couldn't be divided evenly by 13?  How would we match these items to the persons who actually had an interest?  And what if more than one student wanted an item; how do we give everyone a fair shot at something?Thus was born the First Annual Legacy Knights Numismatic Society End of the Year Student Members Only Auction.Up front, I eliminated the idea that they would use real money for bidding.  Not so much to keep the richest kid in the room from winning all the bids, but because the items up for bid were all donations to be given to the kids, or earned as awards for achievements, etc.; not sold to them.I could either have them bid using balance sheets, or I could use "play money".  I opted for the latter, as it was more fun.  For "security reasons", I opted to design and print my own, rather than buy some online.The auction was conducted using custom-made "Knights Payment Certificates" (KPC, Series 171), which were denominated in British pre-decimal Pounds, Shillings, and Pence: 12 pence to a shilling, 20 shillings to a pound.  We used eight different denominations of notes.Now why in the world, you may ask, would I make third graders use pre-decimal British pounds, shillings, and pence?  Well, because we are, after all, Knights; and shillings of one variety or another were once used in many European countries where knights lived.  But more practically, the British system of £/s/d circled the globe with the British Empire; and our student numismatists, all of whom are learning to identify world coins, would be well served if they could understand that system.  And besides, I just thought it would be fun to try.We had to set some auction rules, the main one being that if you overbid and couldn't pay for an item you won, you would forfeit the item, pay a penalty, and be disqualified from bidding for the rest of the auction.  This forced them to think about their bids and kept us from wasting time with overbids.Each student received £6 5/- (or 125 shillings) to use for bidding.  To make it interesting, I let students bring in their own items to auction ahead of the donated items.  In this way, they could add to their bidding funds.  One student nearly doubled his funds with the popular items he auctioned. Donated items auctioned included US and foreign coins and currency, such as an 1843 US large cent, a proof Eisenhower dollar, a BU silver US bicentennial half, US silver certificates, a German 5000 mark banknote, a collection of 1800's world coins, several WW2-era coin sets, a subset of Japanese Invasion Money, a page of four different WW2 Allied Military Currency notes, and rolls of wheat pennies. Other popular hobby-related items included a jeweler's loupe and coin collection display folders, with foldovers and storage tubes being bought outright at the end of the auction for a penny or three.If you're an experienced auction buyer you might think bidding among elementary students would be pretty tame.  You would be wrong!  Some heady sums were reached during the often furious-paced, cookie-fueled bidding. We managed to distribute all the donated items by auction's end.  And most importantly, everyone had a lot of fun.  We will definitely plan another auction for next year!

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25 May 2017

First Year Report on Legacy Knights Numismatic Society

Young Numismatists Exchange | Dave_75466

I can't begin to tell you how thrilled I have been with how well this endeavor has gone.Our membership is limited to 3rd- through 6th-grade students at our school or its affiliated home school program, parents of those students, and any faculty/staff that wish to join.  To give you an idea of the size of school we have, there were 15 students in the 4th grade this year; the other grades were a little larger.  So we're pulling from a maximum pool of maybe 90 students.  You would think we might get a half dozen members, but no:  we ended the year with 13!We were well-supported by the school and the parents.  The school let us use the library for meetings and their video system for presentations.  The print shop made flyers for us, and the office distributed them to the classrooms.  The print shop also printed poster displays for us, and created handsome certificates of appreciation for whenever we had a guest speaker.  The principal and teachers oversaw the students' activities during school hours and set some rules, but didn't ban bringing coins or currency, so that helped.  We got a very positive mention during a State Of The School meeting that boosted awareness.  I had anywhere from one to four parents sitting in on meetings with us and assisting as needed.  The IT shop even helped me out with an email account using the school's domain, which really helps you look professional when communicating on behalf of the club.My favorite local coin shop owner encouraged me to go to a coin show put on by the local coin club.  My son and I went, and there we met the president of the club and other members.  They offered to send guest speakers to present on various numismatic subjects.Our first meeting in February was an introductory meeting, and we covered the topic of how to identify coins and currency.  We followed that up with an off-week discovery trip to the local coin shop.For our second meeting of our existence, two gentlemen from the local club came and presented to our students the most appropriate ways to handle, care for, and display their collections, including the differences between coins that go in blue Whitman folders and coins that get sent off to be slabbed.  Their presentation was geared right at our members' age and experience levels.For our third official meeting, another local numismatist from the local club came and presented "Numismatics of the American Civil War."The Numismatic Knights wrapped up their inaugural year by holding their first annual awards ceremony and student-members-only auction on May 16.  Each member received a medal that will be unique to the inaugural year, created from a Standing Liberty US quarter dollar mounted under a pin-on ribbon drape in a sterling silver bezel.  Each member also now has their own copy of Yeoman's "Red Book" US coin guide, donated by the local coin club, along with a handful of coins to check using their new guide.The auction was a smash hit with our young numismatists!  It was a great way for them to learn about auctions, bidding, and the pre-decimal British monetary system.  I'll explain all that in another blog post.  You have seen auctions, but unless you were there I'll bet most Americans reading this haven't seen a roomful of 8- through 11-year-olds trying to outbid each other in pounds/shillings/pence...  Even higher odds that you haven't seen American kids try to do it.  But they did!Local and regional numismatic clubs and associations have been very supportive as soon as they heard what we were doing.  We've received Red Books donated for members' use, coins, collecting supplies, and back issues of "The Numismatist".  Our local shop has welcomed our group and helped us locate and obtain things we need.We operated on a shoestring budget.  Dues were $20/year but we reduced it to $10 since we started halfway through the year.  $5 of it went immediately to buy a small sack of world coins for each member to keep, study, and trade.  The rest went toward buying some second-hand Krause catalogs; most of the rest was from donations.I'm finding it takes dedication to do things the way they need to be done, but it pays off with results.  We have a great group, with great support, and they are already talking about what we'll do with it next year!You can read more about our Society on our group's Facebook page:  https://www.facebook.com/KnightsNumismatics

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25 May 2017

A lovely Walker

Coins-United States | CoinLady

My second stop downtown today was at my favorite coin shop. (My first stop was the Farmer's Market.) Many lovely coins to look at and admire, but one beauty really stood out.

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