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30 May 2016

The 1957 Oklahoma Semicentennial Exposition Medal

Medals | coinsbygary

Thematic coins and medals based on western subjects were a favorite of both Frasers. James Earle Fraser was born in Winona, Minnesota on November 4, 1876. In 1880 his family moved to Mitchell in the Dakota Territory. It was here in the vast openness of the American frontier that James love of the West grew. In the case of Laura Gardin Fraser, I believe it was her love of American history, the allure and excitement of the American frontier, and her love of horses that inspired her rendition of the “Oklahoma Run” on the 1957 Oklahoma Semicentennial Medal.[1]The motivation for James and Laura’s love of the West impacted their interpretation of it. In an interview with Mrs. Fraser, Dean Krakel, the author of “End of the Trail the Odyssey of a Statue” writes in his book; “There is a mood not only to our lives but to our studio and to everything we have ever done. I saw the frontier in a different light from Jimmy. I saw it with all its glamour, excitement, and motion and so created my Oklahoma Run. Jimmy saw the spiritual mood, the tragedy and emotional undercurrents of the frontier and so created his End of the Trail.” Late in his life, James Earle Fraser received a commission from the Oklahoma City Fairgrounds to sculpt a relief panel of the 1889 Oklahoma Run. With his health failing and near death James asked Laura to finish the panel which at the time was only in the preliminary stages of design. Based on James sketches, Laura finished the 4 x 20 foot panel in 1955, two years after his death. The relief panel features more than 250 figures composed primarily of horses and riders. Unfortunately, due to several disagreements it was not delivered until after Laura’s death in 1966 and a decade after the 1957 Oklahoma semicentennial celebration. The “Run of 1889” relief panel that is a model for the obverse of the Oklahoma Semicentennial Medal currently resides at Oklahoma City’s Bicentennial Plaza.[2][3]Mrs. Fraser brilliantly captures a snapshot of all the chaos, excitement, and fast movement of the Oklahoma Run featured on the obverse of the Oklahoma Semicentennial medal. Up for grabs on April 22,1889 was 2 million acres of land and 50,000 people simultaneously vying for it. As mentioned in a previous paragraph, Mrs. Fraser captures all the glamour, excitement, and motion of the American frontier on the obverse of this medal.[4] The highest relief devices on the obverse of this medal are the largest and most detailed images. The horses have their muscles flexed in full gallop and give an impression of fast motion. As the relief lowers so does the size and detail of the images until the images forming the lowest relief are very small and numerous. This gives the medal a three dimensional look to the action portrayed on the obverse. At the highest relief is a cloud of dust which frames the devices. A few wagons, one just behind the central horse and rider and a covered wagon towards the back adds diversity to the devices.The following is a description of the reverse as given by the editor of The Numismatist, Elston G. Bradfield in the June 1958 issue of The Numismatist; “Reverse: Around, at top, OKLAHOMA SEMI-CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION, at bottom, OKLAHOMA CITY; in center, two dramatic figures facing left, one representing energy and progress and the other imagination and vision; woven into the design are symbols of each activity that is derived from the earth, the air, fire and water. Harvesting is suggested by the scythe, mining by the pick, electricity by the wheels, animal husbandry by the cow and sheep, and power by the waterfall, oil wells and atomic symbol. The figure of Vision reflects the reverence that comes to him from on High. The symbol of the arrow piercing the symbol of atomic energy was the theme of the Oklahoma Semicentennial Exposition, "Arrows to Atoms" in 50 years. To the left of the central figures is 1907 and to right, 1957. In exergue, ~ PROGRESS ~ VISION~.” Certainly, Laura Gardin Fraser employed numerous and appropriate symbols to tell the story of Oklahoma on the reverse of this medal.This medal is struck in bronze by the Medallic Art Company and is 76mm in diameter. Distribution was by the Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce at a cost of $7.50 each.[5]1 “End of the Trail the Odyssey of a Statue” by Dean Krakel; Chapters 2 & 4.2 The Numismatist, July 2013, “Canine & Equine the Art of Laura Gardin Fraser” , pg. 36-37.3 “End of the Trail the Odyssey of a Statue” by Dean Krakel; Chapter 4.4 Wikipedia, “Land Rush of 1889”; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_Rush_of_1889.5 The Numismatist, June 1958, page 664

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30 May 2016

CIVIL WAR TOKENS PART TWO

Tokens | Mike Burn

Hi! I have previously written a blog a while ago on these tokens. The information is based on Q.DAVID BOWERS book A GUIDE BOOK of CIVIL WAR TOKENS. Now a few of you asked me the value on these gems. Well I'll try to keep to keep it simple. Each token is assigned a rarity factor or like I like to call it mintage. These can be found on page four. I will list some to give you an idea. A rarity one means they made greater than 5000. A mintage of four would mean they made 201 to 500. A mintage of six means they made 21 to 75. And a mintage of ten means they made one.

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28 May 2016

The Society of Medalists First Issue

Medals | coinsbygary

Before Laura Gardin Fraser married James Earle Fraser on Thanksgiving Day of 1913 she was an admiring student under his tutelage at the Art Students League in New York City. After three years as a student she joined him as an instructor at the school in 1910. It is here that she honed her skills as a sculptor, receiving several awards for her work.[1]Perhaps on account of James teaching Laura learned that to be successful as a medallic artist she needed to simplify the design, employ appropriate symbols, use care in spacing all the elements, and execute the design with style. Accordingly, I believe Mrs. Fraser meets or exceeds each of the aforementioned objectives with her 1930 Hunter’s Medal. This medal also has the distinction of being the inaugural issue of the Society of Medalists.[2] The Hunter’s Medal is struck in bronze and is 72mm in diameter. It has a mintage of 3,235 and a reported 125 re-strikes with the same pair of dies struck in silver and issued in the 1970’s.[3]The following is quoted by medalist and sculptor Laura Gardin Fraser concerning the Hunter’s Medal. “There are many persons who desire to collect medals but are unable to do so because the medal is used in most instances as a specific award. The scope of the subject matter which bears no relation to a particular person or occasion embraces many forms of expression and the sculptor has a large field of choice. In this case, I felt that a sporting subject would be a departure from what one has been accustomed to seeing in medallic art. Therefore, I chose the hunter with his dog because it presented the opportunity of telling a story embodying a human and animal element. It has been studied as to correctness of detail so that it should have an appeal to those who are interested in out-of-door life. The ruffled grouse forms the reverse. It may be considered as a national game bird and is distinct in character and very decorative. It is hoped that there is sufficient merit in the rendering of this work to appease the collector whose interest is in the art of the medal.” The Circle of Friends of the Medallion (1909-1915) laid the groundwork for the formation of the Society of Medalists under the auspices of the American Federation of the Arts in 1930. The Society of medalists provided a forum for prominent sculptors to exhibit their medallic art. The resulting medals were then made available to the collecting public. From 1930-1995 the Society of Medalists issued a total of 129 medals at a rate of two per year. In addition to the regular issue medals there were also five special issue medals. All the SOM medals were struck by the Medallic Art Company. [4][5][6]The Medallic Art Company then headquartered in New York City was founded in 1903 by two Frenchmen, Henri and Felix Weil. Today, based in Dayton, Nevada, the Medallic Art Company is America’s oldest and largest private mint. The medallic Art Company specializes in making academic awards, maces, and medallions. Among their most notable awards is the Pulitzer Prize, the Peabody Award, the Newbery medal, and the Caldecott medal. The Medallic Art Company has also struck the inaugural medals of eleven presidents.[7][8] 1 The Meadowlark Gallery; http://www.meadowlarkgallery.com/FraserLaura.htm2 The Medal Maker; http://www.medallic.com/about/medal_maker.php3 medallicartcollector.com4 Wikipedia “Society of Medalists”; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_of_Medalists5 Wikipedia “Circle of Friends of the Medallion”; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Circle_of_Friends_of_the_Medallion6 PCGS “Enduring Society of Medalists First Issue Continues to Attract Collectors” by Fred Reed - September 9, 19997 Wikipedia “Medallic Art Company”; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medallic_Art_Company 8 The Medallic Art Company; http://www.medallic.com/

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28 May 2016

victorius coins

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EF & Silvered Antoninianus of Gallienus "VICTORIA AET Victory" Rome RIC 299$169.67or Best OfferValerian I Silver Antoninianus "VICTORIA AVGG Victory Palm" Viminacium RIC 224$225.51or Best OfferV4 - GALLIC EMPIRE Victorinus AR Antoninianus. Cologne, 270-271 - VICTORIA$9.99Buy It NowFrom FranceValerian I. A.D. 253-260. AR Antoninianus A.D. 253 VF VICTORIA GERMANICA 4523$115.00Buy It NowFrom CanadaProbus AE Antoninianus "VICTORIA AVG Victory Trophy" Rome RIC 214 Rare$90.66or Best OfferT14 - GALLIC EMPIRE Tetricus AR Antoninianus. Treves, 271-272 A.D. VICTORIA$4.99Buy It NowFrom FranceT5 - GALLIC EMPIRE Tetricus AR Antoninianus. Treves, 271-272 A.D. VICTORIA$4.99Buy It NowFrom FranceCLAUDIUS II Gotico (268-270 ) - Antoninianus - VICTORIA AVG$25.00Buy It NowFrom SpainValerian I Silver Antoninianus "VICTORIA AVGG Victory" RIC 128 Great Style$70.00or Best Offer(R2) MAXIMIANUS (291 ) - Antoninianus/Aurelianus - VICTORIA A-VGG/ (Siscia)$25.00Buy It NowFree shippingFrom SpainPhilip I Silver Antoninianus "VICTORIA AVGG Victory" Rome RIC 51 Choice EF$168.35or Best Offer280-81 Rome Antoninianus Probus//Victory 'VICTORIA AVG' Sear12052 ~365777G$54.50or Best OfferProbus Silvered AE Antoninianus 281 AD - Rome mint - VICTORIA GERM reverse NICE!$99.990 bids7d 10h left(6/5, 12AM)268-69 Milan Antoninianus Claudius Gothicus//'VICTORIA AVG' Sear11379 ~361854C$39.50or Best OfferClaudius II Gothicus Antoninianus Rome Mint VICTORIA AVG Victory Wreath RIC 104$20.00or Best OfferFree shippingFrom GermanyROMAN SILVER ANTONINIANUS TREBONIANUS GALLUS VICTORIA AVGG 251-253 AD$65.76or Best OfferFrom CyprusROMAN BILLON SILVERED GALLIENUS ANTONINIANUS NIKE 253-268 AD VICTORIA AVG$42.37Buy It NowFrom CyprusRoman bronze Antoninianus of emperor Claudius II, Aequitas reverse$14.54or Best OfferFrom United Kingdom*Lucernae* Quintillus AE antoninianus, VICTORIA.AVG. Rome mint.$18.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Probus silvered antoninianus, Rome. VICTORIA.AVG. R thunderbolt S.$40.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Scarce Probus AE antoninianus. Rome R thunderbolt S. VICTORIA AVG$40.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Valerian I AR antoninianus. Rome. VICTORIA AVG. Attractive!!$35.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Scarce Gallienus AR antoninianus. Rome T. VICTORIA AVG$35.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Probus AE antoninianus. Roma R thunderbolt Γ. VICTORIA AVG. 182$90.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Nice Claudius II AE antoninianus. Rome. VICTORIA AVG$15.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Scarce Diocletian AE antoninianus. Ticinum PXXIT. VICTORIA AVG$15.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Claudius II AE antoninianus. Rome. VICTORIA AVG. Interesting!!$12.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Claudius II AE antoninianus. Rome A. VICTORIA AVG. Lovely!!$25.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Nice Probus AE antoninianus. Rome R thunderbolt S. VICTORIA AVG$25.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Gordian III AR antoninianus. Rome. PM TRP II COS PP. Victoria. Nice!!$35.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Gallienus AE antoninianus. Rome Z. VICTORIA AET. Attractive!!$25.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Nice Trajan Decius AR antoninianus, Rome, 249-251 AD. VICTORIA AVG.$60.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Gallienus AE antoninianus. Rome mint, VICTORIA.AVG. Z. Lovely!$18.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Gallienus AR antoninianus. S/P. VICTORIA AVG. Beautiful & scarce!!$100.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Very nice Claudius II AE antoninianus. Rome. VICTORIA AVG (652)$35.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Claudius II AE antoninianus. VICTORIA AVG. Attractive portrait!!$18.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Lovely Tetricus I AE antoninianus. COMES AVG. Victoria$40.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Trebonianus Gallus AR antoninianus. Rome. VICTORIA AVGG. Lovely!!$75.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Gallienus billon antoninianus, Rome, 261 - 262 A.D. VICTORIA AVG III.$55.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Gallienus billon antoninianus, Antioch mint, 260 A.D., VICTORIA AVG.$35.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Claudius II AE antoninianus. Rome Γ. VICTORIA AVG. Attractive!!$20.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Valerian I AE antoninianus. Rome. VICTORIA AVG. Interesting!!$35.00or Best OfferFrom Spain*Lucernae* Very nice Probus AE antoninianus. Rome R thunderbolt S. VICTORIA AVG$95.00or Best OfferFrom SpainTell us what you think

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28 May 2016

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| user_8931

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28 May 2016

hi

| user_8931

hi qwertyuiolkjhgfdsazx vbhdsdcvgtredscvbhgfdscvbfdsxcvfdsxc vbgfdszxcvfdsxc vfdsxcvgfdsxcvfdsxcvbgfdsxcvghytrdcvhdfghredfvgtrdcvgdfgfdfvgdcvgfdfghgfghjhnmmmmmmmmmmmmjhbjuygfghgfvbhy65trfvbhy6trdc brdcvgtrfvbtfgerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrdxcvgrefgrfcvgghfdcdddddddddddddddvgtfhgtttttttfvbgtrdfcv bhygfvbhgbv bhygfcvbgfdcv bhgvbnhjhgbnmjn mkj nmn kmkmkmkjmkmmkmkmkmkmkkmkmkmkmkkmkmkmkokmonijni9ijn8n8ub78hg7yhgy7yg7yg7gvtgvt6tfcfcdx4sz3waw23

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