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19 Aug 2017

Completed the Redbook collection

Coins-United States | LNCS

After a few years only needed the 1947 Edition (I did have the recent re-print), I was able to acquire not only the 1947 1st printing, but also a 1947 2nd printing.The set does include some of the special editions, the most recent being the NGC 71st edition.Always room for improvement on this set, just like any other(You can also see I have the first 3 editions of the Mega Red Book.)

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18 Aug 2017

More Revised Coin Book Reviews

| user_15398

Ancient Coins Were Shaped Like Hams and Other Freaky Facts About Coins, Bills and Counterfeiting, By: Barbara Seuling

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18 Aug 2017

Blue Ridge Numismatic Association Show

Coins | user_9073

Tomorrow I will be going to the Blue Ridge Numismatic Association Show in Dalton, GA. I will be looking for two books that have recently been released, shopping for some Barber quarters and halves and going to one education program on "African American Signers of US Currency." Hoping for success on all three.

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18 Aug 2017

5 PESO MEXICAN SILVER

Coins-World | Longstrider

One of the perks of doing business with the same coin dealer is you can set up a friendship with him and/or her. I'm lucky enough to have this with my main dealer. He knows I collect old Mexican and Spanish coins. When this 5 peso coin came in to his store, he set it aside for me. Last time I went to his store, he said he had something for me to check out. Needless to say, I snapped it up. I am the new owner of a 1948 5 peso silver coin minted in Mexico City. This type coin was only minted in 1947 and 1948. You can't tell from my dull photos but the coin almost has a DMPL finish and luster. It has a total weight of 30 g of .900 silver. It has a diameter of 40 mm and a thickness of 4 mm.. The reverse, in semi-high relief, has the bust of Aztec chieftain Cuaht'emoc centered with surrounding lettering and repeating "L" shape around rim and the date on the right side. The obverse has the usual Mexican Eagle with snake and cactus centered. It is surrounded with lettering and a rope like design all around the edge of the coin. The edge is reeded. I hope you enjoy the coin as much as I do. I look forward to your comments. Thanks for looking!!

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18 Aug 2017

How spot a fake clipped planchet

| Caleb Karling

The easiest way to spot a fake clip is by seeing if it has theBlakesley effect. The opposite side of the clip will have a weak smoothed out rim, on the reverse and obverse. Also design elements bordering the clip often show smearing or stretching.

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17 Aug 2017

CRAZY UNC WHEAT FOUND COIN ROLL HUNTING! It was as shiny as a sunbeam!

Coins | user_30307

So I recently searched through a box of pennies on the weekend that I got from a really good bank. I went to the same bank where I got the box of pennies that had the 1905 Indian head penny in it. I got back in the car, anxious to see what was inside. But when I checked to see if there were any enders, most of them were 2017's. My happiness faded away a little bit. When I FINALLY got home, i headed down to the basement to make a youtube video about the box of pennies(if you want to see my youtube channel, its riley the coin hunter!). I didn't think I would find anything cool. So far, I had found a few wheats, a stamped, and a couple other ones. I opened another roll that seemed to be another regular roll. Some of the edges looked shiny, but I just thought they were some more 2017's. I poured them out, I skipped them through. and there it was. A beauty. It showed the obverse, so at first I thought it was a 1960's BU penny. But when I looked at the date... IT WAS 1953!!!!! I was flipping out about it. I thought I my eyes were playing tricks on me, but my eyes were perfectly fine. I recorded the incredible discovery on video. It was one of my best finds ever!

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17 Aug 2017

Aluminum: The Most Valuable Metal?

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

Gold is a symbol of wealth in most of the world, whether in coins or bars. If someone owns something common made of gold, this is considered a cause for jealousy. However, if you traveled back in time a couple hundred years, you would find aluminum far more valuable. Generals would have aluminum buttons and silverware made of gold would be for second-best guests, as the aluminum cutlery was reserved for the most prodigious guests. However, eventually the truth about this metal was discovered, and it sank from the realm of silverware to soda cans.

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17 Aug 2017

Stumbling Upon Treasure

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

It is, or was, at one point in their lives, the dream of everyone to find buried treasure. It is not as common as it is in fairy tales or books, but treasures have been found, whether buried or not. In my blog, about a year or so ago, I wrote a few articles about metal detecting finds and the finding of hoards. This article will have more interesting tales of lost treasure. This article will cover two stories, that of Laurie Rimon’s, and Kevin Elliot’s. Both people were not experienced treasure hunters, and while Kevin Elliot was using a metal detector, his family, who were more experienced, had never found anything on that plot of land.

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17 Aug 2017

The Californian Gold Commemorative

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_8029

Before California was a state, gold was found there. Many tokens and other gold coins were made in the area, and California functioned as a stable system, due to its gold mining riches. However, some, like Richard B. Mason, who was the Military Governor of the area, wished for statehood status in the United States of America. In order to prove how wealthy the land of California was, he sent 230 ounces of gold to the state capital. Thus, what is called the first commemorative was born.

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