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28 Dec 2015

For Sale: 1913 Liberty Head Nickel

Coins-United States | LNCS

In looking through the full run of the Numismatist, I found this add in the April 1945 edition.I am curious of which coin this is. Since the ad speaks of the Olsen sale, I would think it is not that example.It may be the "Walton" coin as my pedigree shows Dr. Bolt acquired the coin in 1945.

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22 Mar 2015

Design of new nickels coined

Coins-United States | LNCS

I found this article about the new Buffalo nickel in the newspaper "The Wichita Daily Eagle (Wichita, Kansas) • Sun, Feb 2, 1913"The new nickel soon to take the place of the Goddess of Liberty nickel, which has been in use for many years. will have the American b!son on one side and on the other the American Indian. There will be no "V." Instead will be the bison, under which appears the words "five cents" and "e pluribus unum." In design it will be truly American. It was designed by James E. Fraser, of New York. The nickels will be put in circula-tion at once, and the mint at Phila-delphia yesterday began the stamping out of the coins at the rate of 120 a minute. I attached the image associated with it. Anyone wish the nickel looked like this? Never seen one struck this way.

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21 Dec 2014

Unspendable Money Has More and More Devotees

Coins-United States | LNCS

I found this article in "The Daily Courier (Connellsville, PN) Saturday, Mar 23 1957" about the growing number of coin collectors in the country.This goes to mention how the hobby is growing, with new journals of coin collecting, coin clubs and number of "money" dealers are growing.What was interesting was the last few paragraphs are about the 1933 Saint Gaudens Double Eagle. The story claims there were 9 of them to got out of the mint illegally and they had recovered 8. The 9th example was in possession of King Farouk.Oh, how things have changed. We now know of at least 10 more and there has always been rumors of another.

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27 Oct 2014

Numismatist's are an interesting group

Coins-United States | LNCS

As a group, coin collectors have some interesting quirks. Take the 1922 "Plain" Denver cent. Since no cents were minted in Philadelphia, there is a premium for the 1922 Denver cents that had the mint mark removed prior to minting. The  money paid for these is very substantial when compared to a well struck 1922-D cent. For the last 20 years or so, people are even paying a premium for 1922 Weak D cents. (as graded by the third party grading services).Now ask yourself: Would you pay a premium for a 1914-D cent with a very weak mint-mark? How about a premium for a 1909-S VDB cent with weak "VDB" initials?I suspect that you would not only not pay a premium, but only purchase if the price was discounted and even then you may avoid the coin until a better one comes along.The same sort of die extending procedures led to the 1937-D 3-legged Buffalo nickel and they also demand quite a premium.Why is it that we will pay a huge premium for certain weak struck coins and avoid entirely others?

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12 Oct 2014

Josh Tatum - who is joshing who?

Coins-United States | LNCS

The story of Josh Tatum and the racketeer nickel is well known. The story goes that Josh Tatum was arrested for passing gold plated examples of the new 1883 Liberty Nickel (which did not include the denomination on the coin). At his trial the defense argued that Josh never tried to pass these off as $5 coins, but accepted the change given. It seems Josh was a deaf-mute so he could not tell the person it was a $5 coin. If they gave $4.95 in change, he took it and went on his way.However, no one can seem to find any reference to this case from 1883. The first reference I have found of the story in the June 29, 1959 edition of the Grand Prarie Daily News (Grand Prairie, Texas) in which a local collector had a example of a racketeer nickel and the store of Josh Tatum is told.What I have found is the practice of passing racketeer nickels was in the news in February 1883 (which is just after they were released into circulation)So, the true mystery that remains is who created the story of Josh Tatum?

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06 Sep 2014

1894-S Dime and 1913 Liberty Head Nickel are valuable

Coins-United States | LNCS

I found the following little information snippet in newspapers from 1936 - 1953. 

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25 Aug 2014

1883 No Cent from the Eliasberg collection

Coins-United States | LNCS

How many collect coins from famous collections? Also have one of the Newman Liberty Nickels.

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23 Aug 2014

Prices - comparing PCGS vs NGC vs CAC vs No CAC

Coins-United States | LNCS

For the past 15 years, I have kept track of prices realized from major auctions for Liberty Head nickels. For fun, I thought I would compare those graded by PCGS and NGC (with and without CAC stickers). I did this for grades MS65, MS66 and MS67. I started the run in 2008 as that was the earliest result that included a CAC sticker.

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15 Aug 2014

Liberty Nickel Reverse Types

Coins-United States | LNCS

Reverse of 1900 Touching AM/Far LeafThe letters A and M in AMERICA touch at the right foot of the A and the left foot of the M. Also the leaf above the left arm of the V is far from the serif of the V. This hub can be found on most 1883's, all 1884 through 1900 and on some 1901's and 1902's.Reverse of 1902 A and M Separate/Near Leaf

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09 Aug 2014

Liberty Nickels and the price of color: The holder, the sticker or the coin?

Coins-United States | LNCS

During the 2014 Heritage ANA auctions, I was watching a particular coin very closely. The coin was a 1906 Liberty Nickel, in an older green holder (large size, not rattler), with a Gold CAC sticker and very pretty color (lot 7286). For me, nicely toned Liberty Nickels are few and far between, so this coin had me interested. Quickly the pre-auction bids went over $2,000. (the coin is listed at $510 in the PCGS price guide, and had previously sold for $578 in 2003).

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