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slybluenote's Blog

27 Sep 2020

The GREAT Depression

Paper Money - United States | slybluenote

Good evening folks!

I know that it's strange for me to be blogging at this time of day. I usually like to blog early in the morning when my brain is fresh and my thoughts are more coherent :-)) Football is back on television although there are no crowds. Anyway, I'd like to take a few minutes to talk about my latest purchases, one of which was a 1934 ten dollar bill from the Federal Reserve Bank in San Francisco. Since my mom was born in 1932 and my step-dad even before that, I took the time to read a couple of articles about the great depression and when I was at my local coin dealer's shop this past Saturday, I saw the 1934 note.

I'm not usually attracted to paper currency, but when Mark, my local dealer, commented that it was a nice piece of currency, I decided to purchase it due to the above reasons. I had heard about the great depression in school and basically knew what it was but hadn't really examined the causes and effects that it had on the world economies. This particular bill which I've heard my step-dad refer to as a "sawbuck" more than once comes in 2 varieties. One is called a "LGS" which stands for light green seal and the other is a darker blue-green seal. The LGS is generally worth more money. One article that I read says "The 1934 series $10 bills with the light green seals are worth around $20-35 in very fine condition. In uncirculated condition the price is around $100-150 for bills with an MS 63 grade." This information comes fromhttps://www.silverrecyclers.com/blog/1934-10-dollar-bill.aspx. This price in inline with the $28 that I paid for mine.

Although my mom or my step-dad didn't speak very much about the depression, I knew that "THEY" knew what hard times were about. The sawbuck that I purchased could have possibly been one that helped the economy bounce back, who knows? I do know one thing, the effect that this pandemic is having currently on our jobless rate and economy is wreaking havoc. It certainly causes me to stop and think. I do know one other thing and that is a bad day at camp is better than a good day at work! Enjoy the pictures of my mom, step-dad, and me along with pictures of my 1934 LGS sawbuck! As a side note, here is the history of why a ten dollar bill is called a sawbuck. To quote wikipedia "sawbuckis a slang term for a ten-dollar bill, from the image of the Roman numeral X and its resemblance to the carpentry implement." My step-dad had been a carpenter his whole life.

In conclusion, let me leave you with the website where I read about the Great Depression:https://www.britannica.com/event/Great-Depression/Causes-of-the-decline. This is a great article and explains several reasons for the "Great Depression". As always, stay safe, HEALTHY, and coronavirus free until next time.

Charlie aka slybluenote

Comments

Mal_ANA_YN

Level 5

That is a nice bill. Thanks for the family history during such hardship. My grandfather got me into collecting $2 bills.

slybluenote

Level 5

Thanks for the compliments/comments and taking time to read my blog folks! I appreciated the input and value all comments. Talk to everyone again soon.

Kepi

Level 6

Great blog! That's really a beautiful forest you are hiking in. Thanks for sharing ; )

Golfer

Level 5

Very nice not from back in the day. I am not a collector of paper money but find the history very interesting. Thanks for sharing some family history. Always enjoy hearing about family and lives that were lived. Where were you hiking? Were you out camping somewhere in the picture?

slybluenote

Level 5

Buttermilk Falls State Park in the Southern Tier of New York was where we were camping in this photo Golfer. It's near Ithaca.

It's Mokie

Level 6

My Dad was born in 1916 so was a young man during the worst years of the Depression. He was lucky though, my Grandfather had a supervisor job with the Pennsylvania Railroad and never was out of work. But I know it affected him, he was a bit of a hoarder all his life. Nice note there Charlie, like Longstrider said, you are becoming a currency collector. (:

"SUN"

Level 6

Nice enjoyable blog. I like the personal tough.

Longstrider

Level 6

Thanks Charlie. Nice looking bill. Be careful or you may get hooked on collecting currency. Thanks.

10 dollars would have been so much back then, it could feed a family for days. Paper currency can be bought for reasonable prices, and if anything goes wrong, you know its always worth ten dollars. Good find!

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Thanks for sharing your personal history with us. That is a very nice note too!

Mike

Level 7

First great shots. I'm not big into currency. I did have some Hawaii WW.11 notes a got three of them and there silver certs. Made 204,000 of them with silver certs. Also two gold notes bunch of others that were left me by my mom in law. Bless her. Thanks for writting this. You know these will never be sold. Great pickup .

TheNumisMaster

Level 5

Nice blog charlie! I love the information... my grandmother and mother went through the depression, and often talk about the hard times.

Stumpy

Level 5

Growing up in the early 60's with parents and grandparents who were farmers and were all alive during the depression, (I was a late child), I was regaled with stories and experiences they endured during this time. I have my Great Grandfathers ledger book from that time. As he said he didn't know anything but felt uneasy and withdrew the family savings a few months before the banks failed. He consequentially loaned money to close friends and family. One of the listing is for my Grandfather, he borrowed enough money for 10 lbs of 888 (fertilizer), a large bag of flower (the burlap sack used for the flour was later used for clothing during the depression), and seeds Yes, my Great Grandfather made him pay it back when the crops came in. He purchased some of the family holdings rather than let the bank take it over and after the depression ended set up a payment plan so most of the family did not lose their farms. Believe it or not, of the hundreds of listings almost all of the individuals paid him back. He never charged interest. Times were different then, I wonder how many people would pay it back in today's society. Oh well, nice 10 Dollars. Great Blog!

Longstrider

Level 6

That is such a great man. You come from great stock, as they say. Thanks for sharing.

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