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Stan McDonald - author 's Blog

06 Dec 2021

Misaligned Dies

| Stan McDonald - author

Die misalignments occur when the hammer and anvil dies are not lined up correctly. The results are coins minted with lettering on the rim. The two Lincoln cents in the photo show two coins lined up, one is an intended strike, and the other has been struck with misaligned dies. If the collar were loose or cracked, the coin would be wider than the intended standard.

Comments

Mokie

Level 6

Proving once again that their are many interesting varieties to be found for the patient Numismatist. I am an impatient Numismatist but appreciate all of you that are patient and finding interesting things. Thanks for shedding light on a fun error.

Mal_ANA_YN

Level 4

Very hard to tell from the poor strike on most coins.

Kepi

Level 6

Interesting! Thanks! ; )

A lot of people confuse these with off-center coins.

True. We could say it is off-center with die alignment, but not classified as an off-center coin that has a collar break. Coins like this one are interesting but not of any added value. I have several coin collections going with Lincoln cents that are "not perfect" like this one. In the collections are bubbled, cracks, die mall cuds, die misalignments, yellow 1983 cents etc. Just for fun.

A lot of people confuse these with off-center coins.

Golfer

Level 5

Nice informative information. Will look for this also.

AC coin$

Level 5

Fine details in the coin .

Mike

Level 7

What about wheat cents? Or do you just do modern-day cents?

Wheat cents have the exact same issues. More common to wheat cents are BIE errors. Since I have searched over 250,000 Lincoln cents in the last 5 years, the coins I show are from the finds. I average 12 wheat cents per 2,500 coins searched. So far, I have found one huge die I sold for $80, and a 2019 MS66 DDO I had encased by PCGS. In all, at coins shows I have sold over $300 in minor error coins, BIE errors, missing letters, and numbers, and Lincoln cents with filled letters and numbers. Found - 4 Indian Cents in good condition 4/250000.

Again, I think I've seen some before.

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