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TheNumisMaster's Blog

28 Feb 2021

An Update on Numismastery

| TheNumisMaster

I shall waste no time getting into the topic of today's blog.

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24 Feb 2021

Why Numismatics is the Best Hobby

| TheNumisMaster

Top of the afternoon, my fellow numismatists!!

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22 Feb 2021

A Fast Visit to a LCS

| TheNumisMaster

Considering that I have been collecting for 7 years, it might come as a shock to you all that I have never been to a coin shop. I have been to Rust Rare Coins (before the whole 250 Million Ponzi Scheme came to light) but it was super impersonal, and they seems to be all about how much money they can get out of you, not a mutual love for numismatics. On Saturday I visited All About Coins, owned and operated by Bob Campbell, a former president of the ANA. It was an amazing experience, and I made some amazing connections. I wasn't able to buy anything, as my parents installed a budget of $0 for this month, lol! I might be collaborating with a Lee Mckenzie on Numismastery, to help further my outreach operation. Fingers crossed!! Just wanted to give yall the update, and inform you that I have finally had the "Coin Shop Initiation". Catch ya later!

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17 Feb 2021

Congrats to All YNs!!

| TheNumisMaster

Once again, ladies and gentlemen, the time of the February YN Auction has concluded, and the winners have been contacted! The lots were as follows:

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12 Feb 2021

A Brief History of Large Cents

| TheNumisMaster

Good morning everyone! In todays blog I would like to give you a insert an excerpt from my Numismastery 101 Course which I have been working tirelessly on for the past week. I hope you all enjoy! Like I have mentioned before, the Cent, commonly called the Penny, is my favorite coin to collect. Like many other numismatists, I “specialize” in the US Cent. We have gone over the fact that this was “the peoples coin”, and that it was circulated significantly more than its numismatic counterparts. Because of inflation, we rarely use the penny today. I like to draw a parallel between the cents of the 1800s to the $1 bill today. The Cent was used in the 1800s much like the $1 bill is used today, only slightly more. Not only does this mean that a “early American copper” coin was handled by more people, therefore adding more of a story to its existence, but it makes it harder to find in its original Mint State “red” condition. A highly graded Cent from the 1840’s in full red condition can fetch thousands at auction.

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06 Feb 2021

My Large Cents and Half Cent

| TheNumisMaster

Good evening my fellow numismatists! Before I get into my coins, I first have an exciting announcement! I have an article appearing in the March/April edition of the Errorscope on the 1960 D/D Cent on page 25. Keep a close eye out!!

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05 Feb 2021

About Me

| TheNumisMaster

Top o' the morning folks! Today I wanted to follow Walking Liberty's example and tell you all about me! (Boring, I know) (; So to start things off, my name is Preston, and I am from the wonderful (cold) state of Utah. There are very few coin collectors in the area (Besides our very own "SUN"). I collect all sorts of coins, but prefer US coins. I have a large collection of foreign coins, but only acquired them from personally visiting that country. The same goes for my foreign bills, however, some were gifted to me by a family friend. I "specialize" in Cents from 1792-present. They were the common-peoples coin way back when, and tell the most fascinating stories. In more modern times, they have the most varieties and errors that are fun to cherry pick. Before the coin shortage, I would go through three boxes of pennies every week ($75). To this day I still pull out all of the copper pennies I find, and have a massive rubbermaid bin full of them. (I am a dignified hoarder). Maybe one day I will be able to sell them all. I keep the majority of my "raw" (ungraded) collection stored in 2x2 flips in binders. The rest are just sitting on a shelf lol. My closet is transforming into a numismatic museum, and I am finding myself spending hours in there ont he daily. My parents have never been the collector sorts, yet I still occasionally walk in on my father going through my coins. He will ask me "Whats this?" or "where did this come from, and why is it valuable?" etc. Then he will pull out the classic "You bought this penny on eBay for WHAT??!" haha! I love my parents. I am 17 years old (as of January) and have been collecting coins for 8 years next month. I inherited a sizable starter collection from each of my grandfathers, totalling about $300 in value. I have also been riding the silver bullion market for 5 years, and made some good money for my future that way. I am an absolute history buff, and satisfy that through coins and classes. I have a decent Civil War collection as well. The Civil War era might be my favorite time period to collect things from. That was a big (if not THE biggest) turning point in America, and was overseen by my personal favorite president, Abe Lincoln. It is important here on the ANA to view our members as real people, not just collectors. I encourage you all to write a blog about yourself and your life. Outside of numismatics I enjoy writing (I write novels and magazine articles), basketball, weight lifting, debate, knife flipping (Yes, it is a real thing), and have several world records in the video game Guitar Hero. I love family history, and all things from the past. I am a dignified hoarder (more so than the average collector) and often find myself collecting coins that do not immediately fit in my core collection. You can view my collections I have put up on the site to see what I mean, lol. I hope you all enjoyed! I will look forward to learning a bit more about you all too! Cya 'round! -Preston aka NumisMaster EDIT: I have now included a picture of me. So.... there you are! Despite the blurriness of the picture, I promise you, this is not photoshopped! lol

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