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06 Oct 2019

Coin Collecting for Kids by Steve Otfinoski

| user_15777

Coin Collecting for Kids by Steve Otifinoski gave me a lot of good information and helped me to start my adventures coin collecting. I wish that I had my own copy of this book because I really like the Whitman coin folders, and this is a book with its own coin folder for quarters, but it was the library’s so I could not put any quarters in it. But, I really liked all the pictures and the different information on lots of types of coins like pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, and half dollars and even some fancy dollars called commemoratives. I would 100% recommend this book to anyone starting out in coin collecting, or if they really like coin folders like me, because this has one. I also would recommend this to experienced coin collectors who want to help get new people involved in the hobby. All together, it was a very good read and I was very glad I read it.

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06 Oct 2019

A Guide Book of United States Coins 2019 by RS Yeoman

| user_15777

I really liked this book and I would recommend it to people who think they might want to start collecting coins. I liked this book mainly because I learned so many things and that it really started my interest in coins. This book is about how much coins are worth and it tells you about old coins that do not get minted anymore. It shows a lot of old designs and I liked them a lot so I started collecting my favorite ones. I also learned about different types of coins like there used to be pennies as big as a dollar coin. There were two cents and three cents and half dimes and the same time as nickels. There were twenty cent coins, too. I learned a lot and it really started my coin collecting journey. I think that this book is just a good one to have it is fun to just open it up and look and read about old types of coins from two hundred years ago.

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06 Oct 2019

The Coin Collector’s Survival Manual The 7th Edition

| user_15777

The Coin Collector’s Survival Manual Revised Seventh Edition by Scott A. Travers was an okay book. It was too advanced for me. But I did learn some things that would help me in my collecting efforts. I learned that coin collecting is one of the oldest hobbies in the world and that it used to be called the hobby of kings because coins were so expensive and only the rich could afford to have one. But, eventually that changed and now there are around one hundred and fifty million coin collectors in just the US. It also told me that coins used to be really popular and that he went to a coin convention as a kid and sold most of his coin collection the he had bought for a couple hundred dollars and sold it for around thirty thousand dollars. The book said the phase didn't last long though. It also said not to buy coins off of ebay and told me how to tell if a coin was counterfeit or if it was in a special case that was fake. I would recommend this book to an older person because it took me like three monts to read and it was hard to understand and i had to ask for help with some words and chapters.

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06 Oct 2019

a kids guide to collecting coins by arlyn g sieber

| user_15777

My sister and brother said that I should read this if I wanted to be a good coin collector. I was glad they did because it helped me a lot. It taught me how coins were made and what the p and d stand for. Like it told me how coins start off as blanks and then go through a machine and that all the mint combined can make over one million coins a day. Also, it told me to watch for dimes and quarters and half dollars dated before 1965 because they were primarily made from silver. It also told me not to call pennies pennies. That they are only called pennies in the UK but in America they are one cent pieces. I think that this book is very useful to coin collectors who are starting out even to older coin collectors to freshen up their knowledge. I would recommend it.

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