Login

CC's Blog

19 Oct 2022

YN Auction Grab Bag Win!

Coins | CC

Hi everyone! Sorry I haven't posted in a while--I've been super busy ever since school started back up. I got a job working at the local coin store! But that's not what this is about-this is about the grab bag I won in the YN auction! It was the first grab bag auctioned off--I'd been waiting for it. Once I received it, I was shocked! I was expecting a lot worse coins than these! So this blog is for the people who were constantly commenting (one of them was me) about "what's in the grab bags??" and "Who here has gotten grab bags before? What's in them??" and "we need another space cat background!" (That definitely wasn't me) Anyways, let's get started.First, we have the tokens. There was a "good luck token," a "no cash value token," two transit tokens and two tax tokens. Moving on, because those weren't very interesting, there were two ANA medals. One was proof strike from 2003, and the other was from 1992. They are smaller than a silver dollar but bigger than a half. Next, there were three wheaties. One is a 1930 S, another is a 1928 S, and the last one is a countermarked 1955 D (see pictures!) Then there were a couple assorted world coins, Including a MS Ukraine coin from 2018, A British large cent, an British half cent, a British three pence, and a Canadian quarter. All pretty common. Then there were some a little bit better world coins, including a 1958 Portuguese 50 Centavos, a 1938 British large penny, a 1945 French Five Francs, and a 1962 Swiss 1/2 Frank (or Franc? not sure). Then some very nice World coins-- a 1915 Cuban coin, an 1888 Dominican Republic 2 1/2 Centavos, a 1876 Norwegian 1 Ore, A 1879 Spanish 10 Centavos, and a very high mint state 1944 10 cents from the Netherlands! Then there was a coin I was NOT expecting-a struck off-planchet error! My first good error coin besides a die cud!! Then there was one of those blank penny planchet things form the mint-now my second blank planchet, but a nice one!! Then, off course, they have to toss in a bit of silver! A 1968 Kennedy 40% silver half dollar. These aren't rare or anything, but they have silver value. Last but certainly not least, we have the 1781 Prussian Coin! I love these kinds of old 18th century coins--I was bummed that there weren't any in the auction this year, so I was excited to see this!There you have it, that's all! Not nearly as interesting as the gold, but still a decent win! Congratulations to those of you who won something in this year's YN Auction!

READ MORE
17 Jun 2022

The Unique Link of Three Dollar Gold Pieces, Three Cent Silver Pieces, Large Cents, Washers, and Stamps Part II of II

Coins | CC

Welcome to part II! The links between these three dollar gold pieces, three cent silver trimes, large cents, washers, and stamps is very complicated and complex, so you might find yourself needing to read it through a few times. I will try to set out a chart at the bottom. First, let's start with the link between silver trimes and three dollar gold. The trimes were minted from 1851-1873, very similar times to when the gold pieces were circulating (1854-1889). The three dollar gold pieces were issued first in 1854, but never saw much public use—except by some certain individuals who were hoarding these trimes, who found it easy to exchange one of these gold three dollar coins for 100 trimes. That wasn't too hard, was it? Now we add stamps into the mix. Three cent trimes were issued partly because of the current cost of a postage stamp, which were three cents each. That way, they could pay with just one coin. Now three dollar gold pieces were also able to be spent on exactly 100 stamps, or buying 100 trimes for 100 stamps. Now we have a circle, but what happens when we throw washers in? Back then, washers cost three cents apiece, so you could buy a stamp with a three cent or a washer, both only used one coin. Or you could buy 100 three cents to buy 100 washers with a three dollar gold piece, or you could just buy 100 washers. Confused yet? Well, this is where we toss large cents in. instead of buying your own washers for three cents or buying 100 trimes to buy 100 washers, people just made their own out of large cents, so it only cost one cent. Handy, right? Or you could buy 300 large cents with a three dollar gold piece, and make 30 washers yourself! Well, our hexagon is finally complete! Let me lay out a simple chart for you:

READ MORE
15 Jun 2022

The Unique Link of Three Dollar Gold Pieces, Three Cent Silver Pieces, Large Cents, Washers, and Stamps Part I of II

Coins | CC

The Unique Link of Three Dollar Gold Pieces, Three Cent Silver Pieces, Large Cents, Washers, and Stamps Part I of II

READ MORE
02 Jun 2022

The History of U.S. Half Dimes

Coins | CC

The History of U.S Half Dimes

READ MORE
25 May 2022

The History of Two and Three Cent Pieces

Coins | CC

The History of Two and Three Cent Pieces

READ MORE
08 May 2022

A few 17th Century coins!

| CC

Hello Numismatists! I thought I would do a short blog on my 17th century coins. I only have four, I'm hoping to get more soon. From the top left to the bottom right in the picture:#1. This one I found i. my coin store's "damaged" bin, and pulled it out for free! It is a Latvian silver 1 solidus from 1650. It was issued by Christin (1634-1654), Queen of Sweden. It is is a AU-MS range, and worth about $10.#2. This one took me a while to figure out, but I learned that it is a part silver billon mix 1 soldo from Venice, C. 1680 (no date). It has Jesus Christ on both sides, and is in a VF-XF range, even though it's dented. It is worth about $25.#3. This is my oldest from the 17th century-a 1616 double tournois from France. It is a coin that was used in colonial America, and I am happy to ahve it in my collection. It is in VG-F range, and worth about $20.#4. This is a British coin with Charles I on the obverse. It's date is worn away, but it is from C.1675. It is in about AG-3 condition, but it is another coin used in colonial America. It is worth about $8.Thank you for reading, I hope you enjoyed!!

READ MORE
06 May 2022

Bank dump bin score#2 And epic Nickel box hunt!!

| CC

I went to my bank again today, and they let me go through their "dump bin" again! I got some special edition low mintage Canadian quarters, a 1968 Canadian nickel, a Guatamala commemorative coin, and toned two pence and one pennies and more!! (There was also a no cash value token from 1900, but I didn't realize what it was until I got home) :(. But the best thing was MY FIRST TWO SILVERS in a nickel box!!! 1942S and 1943P! And my first buffalo!!! 1936 full horn!! There were also 3 foreigns--two Canadian nickels and a Mexican $1 coin. See the pictures!! My best nickel box hunt ever!! Thanks for reading!!

READ MORE
06 May 2022

The History of U.S. Large Cents

| CC

U.S. Large Cents

READ MORE

Money.org Blog and Forum Terms & Conditions of Use / Disclaimer

This is a community-sourced blog. Any views or opinions represented in this blog are personal and belong solely to the blog post’s author, and do not represent the views or opinions of the American Numismatic Association, and may not represent the views or opinions of people, institutions or organizations that the author may or may not be associated with in professional or personal capacity.

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The American Numismatic Association (ANA) makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The ANA does not monitor the blog on a constant basis.

The ANA will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information, nor for the availability of this information. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information.

Downloadable Files and Images

Any downloadable file, including but not limited to pdfs, docs, jpegs, pngs, is provided at the user’s own risk. The ANA will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages resulting from a corrupted or damaged file.

Blog/Forum Posts and Comments

In these terms and conditions, “user content” means material including without limitation text, images, audio material, video material, and audio-visual material that you submit to this website, for whatever purpose.

Blog/forum posts and comments are encouraged. However, the ANA reserves the right to edit or delete any blog/forum posts or comments without notice. User content deemed to fall under the following categories will be removed and may prompt disciplinary actions, including, but not limited to, review and suspension/revocation of blog and forum privileges:

  • User content deemed to be spam or questionable spam.
  • User content intended for commercial purposes or to buy, sell or trade items.
  • User content containing profanity.
  • User content containing language or concepts that could be deemed offensive.
  • User content containing hate speech, credible threats, or direct attacks on an individual or group.

In addition, user content shall not be illegal or unlawful, shall not infringe any third party’s legal rights, and shall not be capable of giving rise to legal action whether against you, the ANA, or a third party under any applicable law.

The ANA may terminate your access to all or any part of the website at any time, with or without cause, with or without notice, effective immediately. If you wish to terminate this Agreement or your Money.org account (if you have one), you may simply discontinue using the website. All provisions of this Agreement which by their nature should survive termination shall survive termination, including, without limitation, ownership provisions, warranty disclaimers, indemnity and limitations of liability.

The ANA reserves the right to display advertisements on your account and blog pages.

This blog’s terms & conditions of use / disclaimer is subject to change at anytime.

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.