Login

Anakin104's Blog

25 Aug 2021

Silver Dollars

| Anakin104

The silver dollar is a big coin that is rare and expensive. Scroll down for more info on these dollars. MORGAN DOLLARS A coin law of 1873 had no provision on this silver dollar. George T. Morgan, a former student at the Royal Mint in London, designed this silver dollar. His initial, "M", appears twice, around the neck and in the left loop of the ribbon on the reverse. In the 1900s, the made a little amount of Morgan dollars due to the lack of silver. In 1918, the Mint melted the silver dollars and then brought them back in 1921 for a short time until the Mint used the new Peace design for the silver dollars. PEACE DOLLARS After the mint changed the Morgan silver dollar design, which had 27 years of mintage, the mint used the Peace design for the silver dollars. The Peace dollar, which was released under the terms of the Pittman Act, which referred to bullion. Anthony De Francisci designed the Peace dollar, which was modified in 1922. The design is meant to show designs of emblematic peace. The rarest Peace Dollar are those minted in 1964, which now are illegal to own them because in 1965 the Denver Mint struck around 300,000 Peace Dollars but then in 1973 the U. S government said if any were released to the public the shall be confiscated by the treasury. EISENHOWER DOLLARS The Eisenhower dollar is the first dollar coin since the minted quit minting the Peace dollar in 1935. If you were looking to sell Eisenhower dollars, they would be face value unless uncirculated they would possibly be maybe 5 dollars. In its 8 years of minting, the only different Eisenhower dollar was the 1976 bicentennial dollar, which depicted Indepence Hall after 200 years of freedom from Britain. If you have been reading my other articles, you should remember Independence Hall but if not, you should read Kennedy Half dollars for some facts about it. FUN FACTS 1. On the Peace dollar it has trvst instead of trust. Trvst is latin for trust. 2. Unless your Eisenhower dollar is minted in San Francisco, it is not silver. 3. The Eisenhower dollars minted in Philadelphia and Denver are circulation strikes. 4. The Morgan dollar was minted in Philadelphia, San Francisco, Carson City and New Orleans. 5. The Peace dollar was designed by a 34 yr old and was put in circulation Jan 3,1922. 6. The Peace dollar pictures the head of the Goddess of Liberty on its obverse and on the reverse it depicts an eagle holding an olive branch with the word Peace. SOURCE LIST Google Search, The Red Book by R. S Yeoman, Coins and Paper Money by Allen G Berman and Coin Collecting for Dummies by Ron Guth.

Comments

Mike

Level 7

The Peace Dollar was made in 1921. It was put into circulation. But because it broke so many die. They had to stop. I believe the mintage was over one million coins. It is a key date in the set

Mokie

Level 6

One thing I will say about the Morgans is there are plenty of dates and mintmarks that are well within the budget of the vast majority of collectors. One fun way to collect Morgans is by year. A year set of Morgans is pretty inexpensive save for the 1895 date. I completed the Morgan year set many years ago then sold it. Maybe I should do it again???

I. R. Bama

Level 5

I would, Mokie

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Some large dollars are rare and expensive, but many are affordable,like Eisenhower, Peace and Morgan dollars have many dates you can buy

Golfer

Level 5

Always like a big silver dollar. Can't go wrong.

Kepi

Level 6

Thanks... ; )

Mike

Level 7

The head of the mint contacted the Royal Mint and asked for.someone. GeorgeT. Morgan was sent. He made 80.00 a week and worked in his apartment. That's because Barber and he did not see eye to eye. I would like to know the bibliography. More information. Thanks

Longstrider

Level 6

Short but sweet. I don't know that I agree with everything you stated. What are your sources? Thanks.

We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.