Login

Big Nub Numismatics's Blog

23 Aug 2020

My Favorite Books

| Big Nub Numismatics

Unfortunately, I will have to take a hiatus from my series, Barber Through and Through.For better, or for worse, last Monday I began the fall semester for the University of Toledo. This means I have little free time on my hands, and since most of my classes are now online, I will be on the internet for most of the day. I would like to take time away from the internet every now and then to refresh my eyes, and researching and writing a blog takes a substantial amount of time. I do, however, thoroughly enjoy being active in this community, so I will do my best to remain so. I will continue to share some tips, and items I have in my collection.

READ MORE
11 Aug 2020

Barber Through and Through Part Five

| Big Nub Numismatics

Today we take another trip halfway around the world to another foreign country marked by American engraving: ChinaThese coins were probably the most interesting to research. Previously before this, I had no idea America ever made anything for the Chinese in relation to coinage and numismatics.

READ MORE
07 Aug 2020

Barber Through and Through Part Four

| Big Nub Numismatics

This day's blog will be featured on another one of his earlier designs and creations as chief engraver: The liberty, or, V nickel.Nickels in the beginning

READ MORE
03 Aug 2020

Barber Through and Through Part Three

| Big Nub Numismatics

Today we'll take a look at some of Barber's lesser known works, but also some of his earliest. We'll journey to his incredible 1883 work done for Hawaii.Hawaii today is a tour filled paradise filled with tropical plants and animals native to the island. Popular for vacations, honeymoons, weddings, you name it, its history is most often overlooked for its beauty. What started out as a chain of islands inhabited by Polynesians turned into a thriving kingdom. When white men initially came, they were fought off, and killed after failed "negotiations" ( The first white man to land on Hawaii took the king hostage in return for his stolen boat, he was killed by the tribesmen). Hawaii's fertile land and tropical climate provided an excellent opportunity for businessmen to grow rare crops such as pineapple and sugar to sell on their mainland, this ultimately led to their downfall. When unrest grew from the natives over succession to the throne, both the US and Great Britain brought troops to gain control, and thus more power from the natives. Towards the later half of the 19th century, White "fruit men", as I call them (Dole and such)from the US forced the king of Hawaii to sign a paper stripping the natives of their rights, giving it to the white settlers. Hawaii turned into a cash-crop station for Western civilization which led to its annexation, and finally statehood by the US. But they did gain at least one thing of value, Some Barber coinage. In order to keep the Hawaiian economy from collapsing due to overproduction and an influx of foreign silver, the US decided to strike coinage for the islands in return for the cost of production. The chief engraver Charles was put to the task of creating these coins which turned out great. Deemed one of the best looking busts around, the King was portrayed the obverse of the dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar like no other, and thus Kalakaua coinage was created after King Kalakaua. Rare 12 1/2 cent pieces are the product of beaucratic red tape and misunderstanding. The Hawaiian government initially wanted to use its original denominations, so Barber produced hubs and dies for a 12 1/2 cent piece, but just weeks from minting them, the Hawaiian government decided it would mimic the US's monetary system completely, and the design was fitted for a dime. These dies were finished the following year in 1884, but were all dated 1883. Like most island nations, the reverse bore Hawaii's coat of arms. Charles was also praised for his work on the ability to strike these coins. They were incredibly soft on dies, so more could be struck much more easily than previous conceptions. It was barber at his finest. Shortlived, these coins lasted from 1883 until 1903 putting nearly a million dollars worth of coinage into the economy. The illegal coup to overtake the islands by the US and the successive annexation in 1898 caused Congress to enact a law in order to get rid of the Hawaiian issued coins, about 80% were melted down in return for actual US silver. Barber's best portrayal has some incredibly complex and somewhat evil past behind it. As most of these coins were destroyed, they are highly sought after in all grades, and proof specimens can realize much more than many US coins. With such little notice, barber created a masterful design in less than a few months. 1. Red Book, Hawaii issue section

READ MORE
02 Aug 2020

Numismatic Book Review- United States Gold Coins

| Big Nub Numismatics

United States gold coins have always been out of reach to me. With their metal content alone being worth a small fortune, I never pushed past the Silver dollars in the Red Book, but I always remained curious. Some of the designs such as the Indian Head gold pieces and the St. Gaudens double eagle were always pictured on books covers, and I've always felt their were some of the best engraved designs the US mint had produced. When it came to researching gold coins, I was lost. I didn't have any major reference books on gold in my library, so when it came time to find more about the $4 Stella, I looked at the back of the Red Book's bibliography and found the name David Akers up and down the gold section. Searching more into this, i found that he had produced a book perfect for what I needed,United States Gold Coins: An Analysis Of Auction Records: Volume III Three Dollar Gold Pieces, 1854-1889 And Four Dollar Gold Pieces, 1879-1880,By David Akers.

READ MORE
We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.