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31 Aug 2020

Baptismal Thalers

Coins - World | World_Coin_Nut

I don’t consider myself to be a religious person, more “spiritual”. I know kind of hippie sounding but it’s as good a description as any. I grew up in a semi-religious family and had my share of exposure to stories from the bible.Many coins from around the world have religious themes but my focus is on the coins of the German States. Coins minted before the German unification in 1871. A common image on these coins is the baptism of Christ by John the Baptist in Jordan. I honestly don’t know what drew me to these particular pieces aside from most of them being beautifully engraved.Photo#1SAXE-GOTHA-ALTENBURG 1692 ThalerGotha mint, Goppel-1135, Schnee-502Diameter: 40mmObverse: John the Baptist baptizing Christ in JordanObverse Legend: DIS IST MEIN LEIBER …Reverse: 9-line inscription, large ornament above, crossed palm branches below divide dateSubject: Baptismal ThalerRuler: Friedrich II​Photo#2Harz 1697 ThalerZellerfeld mint; Rudolf Bornemann, mintmaster, Fassbender 2792Diameter: 51.5mmObverse: St. John the Baptist kneeling right, baptizing Jesus Christ standing facing in River Jordan, hands crossed over breast; dove of the Holy Spirit and radiate name of God aboveReverse: Biblical passages in ten lines​Photo#3Hamburgca.16352 ThalerDiameter: 59mmObverse: The AnnunciationObverse Legend: AVE MARIA GRATIA. PLENA. DOMINVSReverse: The Baptism of ChristNote: Ref. G#1586. Prev. KM#F85.​Baptismal Thalers in general are a common theme but there are no issues that are individually better than scarce. Since they are such a popular theme a lot of collectors will find the price point to be unattainable. The last coin pictured is a restrike from the 1970’s that you may find have a more attractive price. You are going to pick them up for anywhere close to spot price but it has a much more attractive price.Photo#41762 Saxony Taler – 1977 Restrikef. Godfather. Baptism of Christ by Johannes d.T. / Engel holds (empty) cartridge, outline. in 2 linesGrade: ProofCatalog: Welter#2192Composition: SilverWeight: 25.17 gThe baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist is a major event in the life of Jesus which is described in three of the gospels: Matthew, Mark and Luke. It is considered to have taken place at Al-Maghtas, located in Jordan.Photo#5Gerard David –The Baptism of Christ, c. 1505​Most modern theologians view the baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist as a historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned. Along with the crucifixion of Jesus, most biblical scholars view it as one of the two historically certain facts about him and often use it as the starting point for the study of the historical Jesus.The baptism is one of the events in the narrative of the life of Jesus in the canonical Gospels; others include the Transfiguration, Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Ascension. Most Christian denominations view the baptism of Jesus as an important event and a basis for the Christian rite of baptism. In Eastern Christianity, Jesus' baptism is commemorated on January 6th. In the Roman Catholic Church, the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran Churches, and some other Western denominations, it is recalled on a day within the following week, the feast of the baptism of the Lord. In Roman Catholicism, the baptism of Jesus is one of the Luminous Mysteries sometimes added to the Rosary.This is the extent of my collection of Baptismal Thalers but I am sure there will be additions made in the future.

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27 Aug 2020

1st Earl of Eldon

Medals | World_Coin_Nut

This was an impulse buy from Heritage in 2019. I just now got around to doing some research.The catalog number is BHM-1308 which is part of the British Historical Medals series.Diameter: 46mmComposition: SilverEngraver: VoigtJohn Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon, was a British barrister and politician. He served as Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain between 1801 and 1806 and again between 1807 and 1827.His wife was the eldest daughter of Aubone Surtees, a Newcastle banker. The Surtees family objected to the match and attempted to prevent it, but a strong attachment had sprung up between them. On 18 November 1772, Scott, with the aid of a ladder and an old friend, carried off the lady from her father's house in the Sandhill, across the border to Blackshields, in Scotland, where they were married. The father of the bridegroom objected not to his son's choice, but to the time he chose to marry. It was a blight on his son's prospects, depriving him of his fellowship and his chance of church preferment.In 1782, he entered Parliament for Lord Weymouth's close borough of Weobley in Herefordshire, which Lord Thurlow obtained for him without solicitation. In Parliament, he gave general and independent support to William Pitt. In 1788, he was appointed Solicitor-General and was knighted, and at the close of this year, he attracted attention by his speeches in support of Pitt's resolutions on the state of the king (George III, who then labored under a mental malady) and the delegation of his authority. In 1793, Sir John Scott was promoted to the office of Attorney-General, in which it fell to him to conduct the memorable prosecutions for high treason against British sympathizers with French republicanism, among others, against the celebrated Horne Tooke. These prosecutions were no doubt instigated by Sir John Scott and were the most important proceedings in which he was ever professionally engaged. He has left on record a defense of his conduct in regard to them.In 1799 the office of chief justice of the Court of Common Pleas became vacant. Sir John Scott's claim to it was not overlooked, and after seventeen years' service in the Lower House, he entered the House of Lords as Baron Eldon. During this time Lord Eldon was revered for his work in consolidating equity into a working body of legal principles.The chancellorship was given to him in 1801 professedly on account of his notorious anti-Catholic zeal. He was responsible for conducting the negotiations which resulted in the recall of Pitt to office as prime minister. Lord Eldon was continued in office as chancellor under Pitt, but the new administration was of short duration. On January 23rd, 1806 William Pitt died and his ministry was succeeded by a coalition, under Lord Grenville. The death of Fox, who became foreign secretary and leader of the House of Commons, soon, however, broke up the Grenville administration; and in the spring of 1807 Lord Eldon once more, under the Duke of Portland's administration, returned to the woolsack, which he continued to occupy for about twenty years.In 1827, shortly after George Canning became Prime Minister Lord Eldon resigned in protest at the age of 76. This medal dates to this time period. He spent the rest of his life trying to regain his position.I've managed to acquire a mid-size but growing collection of British Historic Medals. They have quite the following in the collecting community so the ones with an appealing theme can go for good money but the mintage was generally very low. This medal got graded by NGC a lowly MS60. For the life of me I can't figure out the low (in my opinion) grade but it is probably part of the reason I was able to purchase at a bargain price.Sources:Wikipediaacsearch.info

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20 Aug 2020

Benedetto Pistrucci and the Waterloo Medal

Medals | World_Coin_Nut

This is a partial rewrite from a blog that I posted in 2017. This past Monday I was the presenter for my local coin clubs educational program. While preparing it I updated some of the information and added some new pictures. I hope you enjoy it.

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11 Aug 2020

Church of Saint Martin of Aldoar

Medals | World_Coin_Nut

This medal is a little more modern than what I usually collect but the obverse imagery spoke to me. It was created to commemorate the expansion of a Catholic church in Portugal. Like many modern medals, this one was purchased at a very low price. It is definitely a segment of our hobby that can be collected on a budget.Description:

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