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22 Jun 2020

Horrid Coinage Fails Part 4- The Twenty Cent Piece

Coins | coinfodder

Back to the coinage fails before we continue along with our WWII series.The Twenty Cent Piece was conceived by the newly elected senator from Nevada, John P. Jones. He was a Republican with ties to the silver miners that dotted Nevada. He believed the Twenty center would help to alleviate the current change shortage in the west. Oh, and yes, he wanted to give the silver miners in Nevada someone and some coin to sell to, since the dollar (not trade) had not been made since 1873. He would be creating a win-win- A profit for the miners and more change for the West. It was anticipated to be a success.

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17 Jun 2020

Collecting WWII Coins, Part 2- Britain and Japan

Coins-World | coinfodder

Last issue, we covered the US wartime issues and the coins of the Third Reich. Today, we will cover the wartime issues of the British Empire and the Japanese Empire.During the war, the king of Britain was George VI. He would never of been king if Edward VIII gave up his throne for an American divorcee named Wallis Simpson. Because he was king, his likeness would take up the obverse of the coin.Back then (pre-1971) the British monetary system was not decemialized. Weird and odd conversions were common. The conversions would constantly be changed by parliament.The coins would have George VI's likeness, with a coat of arms or a crown with plumage. They are quite boring to look at, but look good once worn. An XF-40 copy would go for about $10. Most are clad, but some are comprised of 50% silver.Onwards the coins of the Japanese Empire. During the war, the Japanese had controlled much of Pacific, including parts on China, were the soldiers did horrible and cruel things like the Rape of the city of Nanjing. The Japanese war effort began to collapse after the Battle of Midway, where many of their key ships, including the Akagi, the main ship of the Pearl Harbor Attack, were sunk.The coins include the Chrysanthemum seal, symbol of the Emperor Showa (Hirohito). On the back included a multitude of designs, including Mt. Fuji, Cherry Blossoms, and other designs. Some of the designs included holes. These are slightly cheaper than their British counterparts.Thanks, and next time we will be covering Soviet and Italian coins.

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10 Jun 2020

Collecting WWII Coins

Coins-World | coinfodder

Well, since I am interested in WWII and just got a brand new copy of the game Axis and Allies, I decided to write a little thing on WWII coins.In 1942, as the US War Department needed copper and nickel (bullets and tank coverings), they decided to victimize the coins metal content first. Proposed was first was a nickel that was half silver, half consisting of another amalgam of metals. As Thomas Dewey soon found out, this didn't work well in the subways, due to their weight. So, back to the drawling board.The finished war nickel was made of even less silver, and more of the amalgam of manganese and iron. Today, you cannot find these in circulation (though I found a 1943-P in circulation once) due to their silver content, and are available at good prices.The other US coin to be victimized was the penny. That year, they decided to make their pennies out of steel instead of copper. In concept, it was good. But appearance-wise, the coins tarnished easily. So, one year later, until 1946, they made the coins out of recycled bullet shells they had brought back from the fronts. Both varieties are available for good prices, and are popular as novelties for their appearance.Onwards now to the coins of the Third Reich. Overall, Nazi coins are generally more expensive than their American counterparts.In 1939-1945, the monetary unit in Germany was the Reichsmark. These coins came in several denominations, including 25, 50, and (planned) 100,000 Reichsmarks.The designs, however, are bland. Some have the blocky profile of Paul Hindenburg, the Zeppelin namesake, chancellor, and WWI general. Most, if not all of these coins include the eagle and the swastika. If you are trying to find Hitler on one of these, I don't think you can.Overall, buying them is fairly cheap, with some running up too $10-$15, tops. Be careful, as some companies try to hook the unsuspecting person in by selling one of these truly as novelty for $40.Next post, we will be mentioning British, Japanese (Moke if you want to do this you can), and Italian coins. Thanks!

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09 Jun 2020

A Bold Prediction for the Future of Numismatics and the US Mint

Collecting Tips | coinfodder

Today's feature is a bold prediction for the next 10 years of numismatics.1. The death of the pennyYes. The penny, much to my chagrin, is probably going to be cut in the next ten years. The price of one penny is 1.8 cents, amounting to about 8 billion in annual losses. Not looking good for the finance budget. The zinc and copper industry and numismatists are trying to keep the penny going, but honestly, the penny will die soon. That is why I am hoarding them in hopes their value will rise slightly.2. The US Mint's over offeringAfter 2019's silver eagle fiasco and the announcement of the V75 eagles with crazy low mintage, I am sure that this will be a pattern with David Ryder for years to come. The US Mint is going to put out stuff no one wants or cares about.3. NGC and PCGS's riseYes, they are already pretty profitable, and NGC saved itself from destruction by conforming itself to conform with Florida governor Ron DeSantis's essential/non-essential guidelines. Yet, the two companies are growing. More and more people mad with the US Mint's cheap storage, are turning to third party certification to protect and grade coins. Which leads me too...4. The death of the art of gradingYes, coin grading will still exist. But now, with NGC and PCGS grading coins like madmen, less and less people will learn how to grade as many people will depend on the certification companies to grade it for them, leading to less and less people learning how to grade.5. The decline in popularity as a wholeAs the world becomes more digital, kids like me (Yes, I'm a Youth Numismatist) are becoming more enticed by things like video games (I could care less about video games), leading to a decrease of new collectors. This will be a big issue the ANA will have to counter, in some shape or form.So there you have it. The 5 bold predictions I made that will happen by 2030.

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05 Jun 2020

Something Cool...

Coins | coinfodder

Here is some cool fodder to look at.Go to govtrack.org and type in "Coins" into the search bar.There, you can find House and Senate resolutions to create commemorative coins for a certain topic. FOR FREE.Right now I am looking a senate resolution by Tim Scott and Cory Booker to create a coin that will celebrate the 75th anniversary of the intergration of MLB if passed. You can also look at the likelyhood that the coin will pass Congress.

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04 Jun 2020

Finally...

Coins | coinfodder

Today is the day.Finally, several months after the predicted day of the release of the 2020 National Basketball Hall of Fame Coins, today the coins finally come out at noon today.Obviously, you can buy them straight from the US Mint, but certification offers are wide and complex.PCGS is offering a special label for any coins that reach their headquarters in Santa Ana, California. Also, you can recieve an special orange colored box with every ceritification.NGC, on the other hand, is offering an entire suite of coins label and certification options. You can opt for the traditional brown and early release labels, or special labels, including a brand new core.Overall, you have many options to choose from. Good luck.O', and you can also start sending in your basketball coins to certify now.

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03 Jun 2020

Littleton's Price Gouging- How to avoid It

Collecting Tips | coinfodder

Were going to take a break from the horrible coinage fails and talk about something else- Littleton Coin Company's constant price gouging. (Littleton please don't sue me, please)Manyard Sundman, the founder of Littleton, believed that expanding advertisements to the general media over sticking to collector magazines would push Littleton Coin Company to success. Which it did.Now, I firmly believe that Littleton is out to take advantage of the casual collector and rip every last dollar out of them.Take a set of 1880 O's graded F-8, for example. 10 coins come in the set. All of these coins are worth about $350. So Littleton decides to sell them for $800, calling them rare, and stating that we will never see them again. To add further insult to injury, their albums are around $25, and folders $4. What they don't want you to realize is that many places sell them for slightly cheaper. Barnes and Noble sells the folders for $3.50, and Wizard Coin Supply has both albums and folders at a surplus, much cheaper than Littleton. You can see how Littleton price gouges constantly, using buzzwords to trick you.The sad part is how they trick the unknowing. I mean, if collectors like us get scammed by them, it's on us because we know better. But they scam the general public into overpaying on coins that are worth much less.To avoid price gouging, look around. Ebay generally has better prices, and many other places have cheap deals on supplies.On yeah, Wizard sells Red Books for cheap. They sell them for normally around $10. But, the products (like a Mega Red I ordered one year) tend to come slightly damaged (I exchanged the book because I'm picky) but telling them to take care will do numbers in the care they place on your supplies.

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01 Jun 2020

Horrid Coinage Fails Part 2- Anything Made By Charles Barber

Coins | coinfodder

NOTE: INDIAN HEAD PENNY IN PHOTO DESIGNED BY JAMES B LONGACRENow, today, these coins are considered greats (I think they are cool) and are collected widely. But 100 years ago, these coins were massive fails. America wanted a cool design. There was a lot of bad press at this coin. Again, please type other bad coins in your opinion and I'll cover them on a later post.In 1892, the Liberty Seated design had been a mainstay since, lets say, a kid from 1892 would know a grandparent who was still a kid when these came out. They were standing the test of time, showing the freedom that America had won in the classic liberty cap hanging on the post.Charles Barber and Benjamin Harrison, the president at the time, commissioned a small group to create new motifs for the dime, quarter, and the half. Barber rejected them all and began to create his own. Now, keep in mind, that the design for the Liberty Nickel he created that debuted in 1883 had garnered bad press. But, he trudged on with it, creating a worse design (In 1892's mindset) than the group they commissioned. But the coin went out into the public anyways.Instantly, the coin garnered horrible press. The ANS begged and petitioned to can the coins and Barber as chief engraver. America hated the coins as a whole, but used them anyway, unlike the SBA dollar I mentioned in the last issue.In 1915 and 1916, US Mint director Charles Woodley announced changes to the Barber suite, having replaced the nickel in 1913 with the buffalo nickel. Barber made a last ditch attempt to create new designs, but was struck down early. He died in 1917, as Adolph Weinman and Hermon Macneil's motifs took over and became some of the most loved coins of all time.So, that is why this coin was a fail. See you next time, comment suggestions down below, and in the meantime, enjoy horrid coinage fails part 2.PS- How to you change from my default name to a cool name like Mike B?

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