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coinfodder's Blog

26 Aug 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Part 7- Connecticut

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello, fellow brothers and sisters of the ANA! Today, we head from Rocky Mountain High to the east coast, to Eli Yale and his brothers in Connecticut.

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12 Aug 2020

The National Coin Shortage- Hoax or Justified?

Exonumia | coinfodder

Well folks, as you see at the stores, there is a National "Coin Shortage" going on at the moment. To most, this was caused by the guy who ate a bat in China and spread "the virus" to the United States and beyond. While I think this is partially true, I think there is another underlying reason behind the shortage. My culprits are...1...Folks staying at home due to the VirusThis is sort of a tie in to Virus point in the intro, but as we are probably were, we were holed at home. Some states were lucky and came out of lock down quicker. However, we saw many things happen that don't happen, like people picking up new hobbies (I began writing in here in March right before Coronachan hit), to women shaving their whole heads. Based on that thinking, people may of found out about the 50 State Quarter's Series and The America the Beautiful someway or another. Those newbies who find out search pocket change, and keep the ones they need for their folders, causing less and less quarters to reenter circulation. (By the way, I hope these newbies join the ANA.)2... The Credit Card Industry.Here is were I hit my first hoax. I think a reason for the ongoing coin shortage is that the credit card industry concocted it. My idea for this theory- they told everyone about the coin shortage to hook people on credit cards. Which leads me to......3...The Government Faked it.It is know by both Democrats and Republicans that the sons of J. Edgar Hoover and the CIA in Langley like to spy on you. To get even deeper into the private search and shopping habits of people (the CIA knows what coins we buy) they told everyone there was a coin shortage. Then, they hope that you would hook onto a credit card. Which would allow the FBI to track you.Got anymore nutty theories? This is not really a numismatic post, but it involves coins and is a goopy, fun forum. See you later!

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12 Aug 2020

War is Over... Commemorating the End of WWII

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello Folks. On August 14th, 1945, the Japanese accepted the terms of the Potsdam Declaration and surrendered every force in the Pacific. After 6+ years of bloody fighting, from the streets of Stalingrad, to Henderson Field on Guadalcanal,to the sands of El Alamein, to the beaches of Normandy, to the fields of Flanders (Market Garden), and to the rocks of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, the war had finally stopped in the hands of the atom bomb, ending a meat grinder that ended over 85 million lives.

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05 Aug 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Part 5- California

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello Folks. To the West Coast now, to the state where nature meets fame. California.California was once the barren enclave of the United States. The state won its independence from Mexico, using the flag that is now one the state flag. Joining the Union as a free state as part of the disastrous Compromise of 1850, California was just a frontier until gold was found in 1849. That gold sent people west, sending California into statehood just a year later. California stayed as a naturalist haven, thanks to John Muir, until the late 1800's. Then, the movie industry flocked to North LA, creating Hollywood and other towns like Culver City and Inglewood, two of LA's suburbs built on the luxury industry. Soon after, the state became a resort for the rich, turning California from the conservative roots into one of the liberal states in America. Famous people include Jack London, John Muir, George Lucas, and many, many more.To the coins now.California, despite being a playground for the rich and hob-nob, has not shied away from its natural beauty. This, instead of film, is personified on both the 50 State Quarter and the America the Beautiful Quarter. Both feature some view of Yosemite, El Captian on the 50 state and Half Dome on the other. The giant sequoia and naturalist John Muir is located on the 50 state to totally encompass California's natural beauty.California, for its 75th anniversary in 1925, received a commemorative half. The front features a gold miner, while the back features a bear, the animal on the state flag. Designed by Jo Mora, the design was criticized, most notably by James Earle Fraser, but is now considered on of the better commemorative designs in the classic series.Also, in 1915, a series of commemoratives came out, touting the Panama Convention in San Fran that year. There were five coins. A Half, a gold dollar, a quarter eagle, and most notably, a $50 gold piece. That was ridiculous, even for the time. Farran Zerbe sold them for a huge cost. But, if you bought it in 1915, you have just made a HUGE profit. The round and octagonal piece are now very rare, and in MS-63 state will give you about $87,000 for each, on average. The $50 was a design by Robert Aitken. The others were Charles Barber, George Morgan, and Charles Keck. If you buy them all, it will set you back over $150,000.If you are a fan of private gold, you probably know who Templeton Reid is. Reid, after being slandered in Georgia, left the big peach for California, were he re-opened his mint and began creating coins. He didn't create much. He created one type, a rather bland coin, as private minters couldn't do as much detail as the real mint did.Past coins, one of the 4 mints are located here. The San Francisco Mint. The mint created the mint here to create a spot were gold coming in from the gold rush could be instantly created into coins. Now, the only responsibility is to create proofs and silver eagles.Thank You!

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