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29 Sep 2020

The History Of Coinage Types in the United States- The Half Cent

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Well, to put things in perspective, I think I have become older, taller, and wider on my birthday today. To celebrate, I am pushing a new set of blog posts to compliment the 50 States series I am doing. So great. Presenting the history of the Half Cent from coinfodder, who is one year older, taller, and wider.

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29 Sep 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Trivia Quiz Part 1 Answers

| coinfodder

Hello. Here are the answers to last weeks trivia.

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24 Sep 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Trivia Quiz Part 1

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello folks. Today, I will test some fun numismatic knowledge from the previous 10 Fifty States of coinage. Please respond in the chat with the answer and the state that covered the answer. To make things easier, I have created a tag. So, are you ready? Winner receive bragging rights (Until the next ten comes up).1) Which company where the original owners of the Denver Mint? What coins did they strike? What was odd about some of them?

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17 Sep 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Part 9- Florida

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello Folks. And today, we will head down to the Sunshine State to go eat some tangerines. (Just Kidding). Today, we are going to look at Florida Coins.Florida was first mentioned by Europeans by Juan Ponce de Leon, a man of Spanish origin, who gave it the name Florida, seeing all the flowers there. Florida was an important area for Spain, and the War of Jenkins' Ear was fought over the Spaniards trying to protect Florida, after enraging the British after physically CUTTING OFF an ambassador's ear. Florida, in 1827, was admitted as a state after being ceded to the United States by Spain. During the Civil War, Florida was one of the 7 original states to succeed from the union. During the 1950's, many Cubans from Cuba fled for the United States after the late Fidel Castro and co. took over. The Cubans fled to Miami.Today, Florida is a melting pot of cultures, including African-American, Cuban, Seminole, just to name a few. Florida has become a economic powerhouse, becoming the number one state in the US for tourism. Famous people from Florida include Osceola, Bob Ross, Fay Dunway, and Flo Rida.Obviously, first to mind is the 50 State and ATB (America the Beautiful, because I am tired of spelling it out) quarters. On the 50 state Quarter is a ship, an stretch of land, and a space shuttle lifting off into space. On the bottom of the coin is "Gateway to Discovery" demonstrating how not only Florida is an economic powerhouse, but it has been the gateway to discovery for many people, including de Leon and the NASA folks manning the Space Shuttle (RIP Columbia/Challenger). For your viewing enjoyment, I have including a proposed design.On the ATB quarter, is a montage of the Everglades. This coin features a heron, standing in some marshland. This coin was released in 2014.On the topic of Florida, lets talk about Spanish Coins!For those who didn't know, Spanish coins where legal tender until the 1856 introduction of the small cent into circulation. These were often used more than early American coinage. Many people back in the day had never seen a real American coin; quite to the contrary, they had been using the Spanish cobs for many years.Technically, these Spanish coins were cobs before around 1750. These were crudely struck pieces, struck in Mexico City then sent to Florida for circulation there. Most often, you will see King Phillip II cobs for Charles III cobs. They are listed in the red book, and for coins in EF state will set you back about 400-800 dollars.

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16 Sep 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage-Part 8-Delaware

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello Folks. And today, we will visit the great state of Delaware.Delaware was first settled by the Swedish people. They set up a colony and began to settle when our friends, the English, came over and settled the region. They took chunks of three colonies and formed the colony of Delaware. In the late 1600's, William Penn wanted a seaboard, so more territory was taken from Delaware to form the small riverside area on the Delaware River now known as Philadelphia. Later, after the American Revolution, the state became the first state to ratify the constitution.Today, thanks to its laws, Delaware is now a safe haven for corporate industry, the state having the domicile of 50% of all NYSE companies and 60% of all Fortune companies. Famous people from Delaware include Joe Biden and Caesar Rodney.To the coins, now.Delaware is proud of their native son Caesar Rodney, and so he is portrayed on the 50 State Quarters program. In 1999, the program started, with Delaware having the honors as the first state to release their coin. On it, is Rodney on horseback, referencing his 18-hour ride to Philly, just in time to cast the deciding vote on whether the colonies should succeed from Great Britain. Also on the coin, is the words "The First State" another reminder that Delaware was the first state to ratify the Constitution.On the America the Beautiful Coin, is Bombay Hook NWR. This little-known reserve of land is one of the few remaining stretches of "tidal salt marsh" in the Mid-Atlantic region. However, the 2015 coin's design is one to forget-yet another bird, the 4th of a series of 7 birds that would be placed on the America the Beautiful Coins.In 1936, during the commemorative coin craze, came another low-mintage coin- the DelawareTercentenaryHalf Dollar. The entire coin honors the Swedish in Delaware. On the front, is the Old Swedes Church, still visible if you head to First State NHS today. On the back is the Kalmar Nickel, the first ship used to carry the people from Sweden. Not surprisingly, the sponsor of this coin was- The Delaware Swedish TercentenaryCommission. Thanks, and see you soon!

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09 Sep 2020

How to Build a Numismatic Library of Repute

ANA Library | coinfodder

Hello Folks. And today, we will learn how to construct a numismatic library that will serve you for years.The importance of a library has been known for thousands of years. The Egyptians at Alexandria kept one of the largest libraries on Earth, containing thousands of scrolls. And with coin collecting, a selection of books and other resources is of paramount importance to the collector. So, lets hop right into it!And no, if I mention Whitman or Krause products, just know that this is not a running ad for them.To many collectors, the price guide is the most important single book in a coin library. Many, for 70+ years, have relied on the Red Book of Coins for their go-to price guide. Some, instead of buying a hard copy, refer to an online website or app, such as PCGS's CoinFacts. In all honesty, however, I much prefer the hard copy, due to the fact I cannot be on the computer 24/7. I own 4 copies of the Mega Red Book of Coins. These are important because they not only give you a brief history of the coin, but they also provide photos, grading advice, and prices and condition. Many of these also have a reference section in the front of the book, providing important information about coin collecting as a whole.Next, are the individual coinage type guides, i.e. the Bowers Series. These provide an even more in depth overview over the specific coin you are collecting than any general interest price guide can provide you. These guides are purposely dedicated to type that they are covering. They provide an in-depth price guide, and normally provide an appendix that has cool information. For example, the shield and liberty nickels Bower's Series guide comes with four sections about the nickel's use in the everyday lives of Americans living at the turn of the century. For the investor and the collector who collects one type of coin, these guides are a must have. I like learning about different coins and reading about them, so I am crazy enough to try to collect all 23 Bowers Series books.Also of importance, are the investor's guides, such as Beth Deisher's "Cash in your Coins". These guides appeal to the investor, who is looking to sell rare and valuable coins at a profit. These guides have the best advice on how to invest on coins wisely. They distill common sense into the investor. For example, you could learn NOT to pay $2,000,000 on a coin that should be $1,000,000, therefore and so-forth.Next, are the counterfeit guides. Always of importance, these tell you how to avoid making common mistakes when buying rather valuable coins. An example includes Bill Fivaz's "United States Gold: Counterfeit Detection Guide." However, collectors are to be warned that no guide can list every single type of counterfeit out there.And finally, we have the works of prose and history books, such as Garrett and Moran's "1849: The Philadelphia Mint Strikes Gold." These are cool, not for their collecting reference ability, but the fact that they are cool reads. Some discuss the shipwrecks like the S.S. Central America, and other topics of interest.Thanks, and we will continue on our road trip later.

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02 Sep 2020

V-75, VJ Day

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello Folks. And as you may know, today (September 2nd) is VJ Day. Japan, after the atom bomb fell, surrendered to the allied powers, led by the one and only Douglas MacArthur. Today, we will honor the five men who achieved the rank of 5-star general, and those men on coins.Arnold. Bradley. Marshal. Eisenhower. MacArthur. These men were the only five men to receive the rank of five-star general, outranked by only John J. Pershing and George Washington at six-star. These men led America to victory in WW2, the deadliest conflict in human history. Over 85 million people perished during the Sino-Japanese war and WW2. We saw the worst in men, but we also saw the best in humanity. We saw empires collapse. New superpowers in the U.S.S.R and the United States. Great Britain would be wrecked from the war and would decline as a world superpower. Japan, on the other hand, was rebuilt from the ground up. These men bravely led the men of the "Greatest Generation."Let us begin.

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