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coinfodder's Blog

29 Jul 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Part 4- Arkansas

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Hello Folks and fellow Numismatists. Today, we will continue our road trip around the United States, reaching Arkansas.
Arkansas is the 25th state in the Union. Arkansas is considered a flyover by many, not to dull but not worth a stop. However, one of the 61 National Parks (Hot Springs) are located here. A hotbed of Civil Rights, Little Rock High, is located. And in the dull part of Arkansas, lies a little place called Hope, birthplace of the 42nd President, Bill Clinton.
Anyways, into coinage now.
The 50 state quarter for Arkansas features a diamond and a swan, images representing the state slogan, the "Natural State". The design is one of the first done by the Artistic Infusion Program (AIP) and is considered one of the series better designs.
The America the Beautiful Coin featuring Hot Springs National Park was oddly the first in the series on 56 Quarters. The design is the design outside one of the bathhouses, presumably Fordyce. The door is inlaid with tiles. If you look carefully to the right of the water trough, the NPS arrowhead is on the wall. Very cool.

Let us now head way back in time, to the late 1930's, during the height of the Commemorative Craze. From 1935-1939, two coins were produced celebrating the 100th birthday of Arkansas. The first was the Arkansas Centennial Half. The state name surrounded by the stars in on the front. On the back is an Indian chief and liberty with the Liberty Cap. The constant mintage was another money milker, as more years on sale=more money in the commissions pocket.
The second coin was the Arkansas Centennial-Robinson Half Dollar. This time, the coin was issued by Stack's in NYC. The front was the same, but the back featured Senator Joseph P. Robinson.
A note about both- the side with the people is the reverse, but many pictures have the sides switched. So be it.
Thanks, and see you next week.

Comments

Mike B

Level 7

Owning the coin is also good. You get a special feeling when your holding it. Anyone can read the red book. It gives inventive to write.

Mike B

Level 7

Wikipedia is not good for updated information. Try a book. You don't learn from Wikipedia but books you will.

coinfodder

Level 4

I use the Red Book for info. I mostly use wiki for pictures.

Longstrider

Level 6

Nice overview iof Arkansas. Like many here are saying, Wikipedia is not a source you should use. Maybe go to their bibliography to find more trustful places. Just a suggestion. Thanks.

Use wikipedia's sources if you can't find your own.

Longstrider

Level 6

I disagree. Not a good source at all. Anything can be put up there. Plrnty of other sites. I can't think of anything here that an't be found on sites other than Wikipedia. Just my opinion I could be wrong.

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Wikipedia is not a good source for academic research. It is crowd sourced and not necessarily accurate. You have to write in and challenge information in order to correct it if they do at all. Sometimes they do and sometimes they don't. I use Wikipedia to get a quick overview to set my course to find accurate research. Hope this is helpful to you and I am not trying to come across as critical, just trying to be helpful...

coinfodder

Level 4

I mostly source Wiki for photos.

Golfer

Level 5

Thanks for the trip to Arkansas. I've never been to this state, but it was nice to see the quarter and commemoratives. Always liked the older commemoratives.

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Thanks for the nice review of the coin, but I think the state Motto of Arkansas is "Regnat Populus" Latin for "The People Rule"

coinfodder

Level 4

Thanks Mike. I'll change it. Thanks to Wiki, I got them mixed up. "Natural state" may be the slogan.

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