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28 Jul 2018

Who was Hermon Atkins MacNeil?

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

Out in a farm in Everett, Massachusetts, Hermon Atkins MacNeil was born on February 27th, 1866. He began art classes at a school in a large city of Boston, Massachusetts. Hermon would later graduate form the school and attend a university. While at Cornell University, he continued to learn and grow in multiple areas of art as a young adult. After this, Hermon moved to Europe to master sculpting, modeling, and other forms of art. He settled in France for a couple of years and attended well known schools to increase his mastery in the skill. Hermon returned to America to work with Frederick MacMonnies and Lorado Taft. He took the role of teaching at the Art Institute of Chicago and eventually started his own art studio. A typical work of art by Hermon produced Native Americans. Over time his respect for natives increased. He even traveled to tribes to recreate artwork and pictures for them. At the young age of twenty-nine, Hermon married Carol Louise Brooks who was also a sculptor. Their wedding took place on Christmas Day, 1885. The following year, Hermon received a scholarship allowing the newly wed couple to move to Rome. There they had a son and Hermon started another art studio. After completing pieces of art, they traveled again back to Paris, France. As he traveled around, his reputation increased as he made more and more art. From there he settled back in United States of America. Here Hermon created many works of art to be displayed at various expositions. The United States mint directory which was Robert Woolley at the time, was pushing for new coin designs. Hermon entered the contest for the new quarter design. A famous man named Adolph Weinman at the same time entered his designed. Adolph's were chosen for the United States dime and half dollar. Hermon's design was liberty holding a shield and an olive branch. This is today called the Standing Liberty Quarter. His intent with the design was to symbolize that the United States wanted peace during World War I. Also, the shield represented that they would fight if needed. He wasn't happy about all of the changes wanted by Director Friedrich von Engelken. Hermon placed changes he wanted on the Standing Liberty Quarter, resulting in a type II. Hermon's inspiration was based off of Doris Doscher for his Standing Liberty. This design lasted for fourteen years, and ended at the start of the Great Depression, in 1930. This was to be his only United States coin, but his work didn't stop there. He completed work on the United States Supreme Court building, the Pony Express, and competed in several contests. He lived in his home and art studio till his death. He died at the age of 81. Hermon Atkins MacNeil completed many accomplishments in his life full of art and sculpting.

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28 Jul 2018

Who was James Barton Longacre?

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

Little did he know that he would become a famous 19th century chief engraver and and the 4th one at the U.S. Mint. Sarah and Peter Longacre on August 11, 1794 has a son named James Barton Longacre. James and his family at the time lived out in the country on a farm in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Growing up, Sarah Longacre, his mother, died while James was at a young age. When home life became difficult, James left to go on his own. He found work being an apprentice for a book seller named James Watson. Then finding his passion, James went out to work for George Murray, a banknote engraver. At around twenty five, he began his own engraving business. James engraved plates for bank notes, book illustrations, and the founding fathers. Many years later, on September 16th, 1844, the president at the time commissioned James to the role of being the 4th chief engraver of the U.S. Following the death of the 3rd chief engraver, Christian Gobrecht, Janes struggled getting along with fellow workers at his job. His fellow coworkers even went as far as trying to get him fired . The first two big projects he was in charge of were the Liberty Head Hold Dollar and a double eagle coin. As there would be many changes in the gold dollar coins, James Longacre would be the only designer and engraver. He would be a major overseer of the opening of the San Fransico mint. Inspired by the previous chief engraver, James created the Flying Eagle one cent. They then decided to change the design to an easier one to mint. He created a fantastic design for the next cent, the Indian Head penny. Slight changes were made along the way too. James must have liked the Indian Head Princess design, engraving the Indian Head penny similar. He would later go onto uniquely design the first United States two cent piece in 1864. It was ended in 1873. Even more interesting, he introduced the three cent piece. The composition would include silver from 1851 to 1873 and it would chang to nickel after. It would cease to exist in 1889. James was not done yet. He brought back the idea of the half dime, only calling his recreation the five cent "nickel." His first design would be the shield nickel and later types of nickels would follow. At his time spent being the chief engraver he encountered William Barber, father of Charles Barber, and other known people. James would also help in the production of Chile coins, too. Sadly, James Longacre would pass away during New Year's Day. He had his final breath on January 1st, 1869. Fellow workers that knew James came together to remember his death. William Barber would then follow James as the 5th United States chief engraver. His son, Charles would then take the role as the 6th chief engraver.

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18 Jul 2018

Who was Charles Edward Barber?

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

In London on November 16, 1840 Charles Edward Barber was born. Together, his family moved out of London and into the United States of America, because his dad, William Barber, had taken a job opening with the Philadelphia Mint. Charles learned from his dad about engraving skills growing up, and took the job of being his father's apprentice. During his time of assisting his dad and being his apprentice, Charles fell in love with Martha E. Jones in 1875. They would later have a daughter named Edith. August 31, 1879 was the day that his dad died. The mint was then looking for a new chief engraver following the death of William Barber. In search for a new engravers, they created a contest for ten people. The whole contest ended up falling apart and the United States Mint then went to its plan B. George Morgan, Charles Barber, and William Key were told to each create a design to see which would be chosen to take over the job. In the end, Charles was chosen to work as the Chief Engraver for the Mint. His first coin designed by Charles was the the $4 Gold Stella Coin. It only was produced only for a year and interestingly possessed the words "400 CENTS" on it. Currently, this coin brings up to seven figures in value to collectors. A few years down the road, Charles introduced the Liberty Head V Nickel. The Mint at the time was wanting to replace the current design of the seated liberty and other types of coins around the time. The words "5 CENTS" were later added on to help keep fraud transactions from happening. Charles started the journey in creating the Barber coins in 1891. He designed a plaster half dollar containing a seated liberty named Columbia for his first design. This was rejected by the Mint. Many people complained about parts of the design including President Harrison, Mint director, and the public. Another person who heavily criticized Charles was President Roosevelt. The president would have preferred Augustus Gaudens to create the designes instead of Charles. The result produced a similar creation of Charles' first design. His design was used for the dime, quarter, and half dollar. He also helped over see the start of the Denver Coin Mint. Other countries he helped produce coins for were Hawaii (later a state), Venezuela, and Cuba. He had a large stash of coins he engraved over the 48 years at the Mint. He did produce commemorative coins and medals in the remarkable career that he had. He married Caroline Gaston on December 3, 1907. His Barber design for the dime, quarter, and half dollar would last for several years later after his death. He died in Philadelphia on February 18, 1917. He was also buried in the city too.

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17 Jul 2018

Who was Victor David Brenner?

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

Victor David Brenner was born on June 12, 1871 in Lithuania. Growing up, his family was a Jewish family living in Siauliai, Lithuania.At a young age, Victor learned skills from his dad including gem engraving, seal engraving, and sculpting.When he was nineteen, he moved to the United States of America, and settled in New York City. He only knew the skills his dad taught him when he came over. Victor learned English and French during the eight years he stayed in the United States. He then decided to travel to Paris, and attend a local art school. During his time in France, he won several awards and became well known among many. After that, he decided to go back to the States, and advance on to the next step in his career. Victor then took a job of being in charge of die cutting and also joined the American Numismatic and Archaeological Society. Victor displayed some of his many fine works including one of Abraham Lincoln on a medal to the current president, Theodore Roosevelt.Throughout the up coming years, Victor Brenner built a relationship with Theodore Roosevelt, and they determined that the United States needed a new design for the cent. The mint then announced the upcoming of a new design for the cent to celebrate the 100th commemorative of Abraham Lincoln. Victor David Brenner was put in charge of the design. He put his intials on the coin, and it would become one of the most popular and well known cents. The United States even sent a Mars Rober with the 1909 Lincoln Cent on it. It is still on Mars today. As many liked the design, they complained about having his intials on the coin. The coin ended up being recalled and the rest of the minted coins didn't possess his intials on the coin. This created the 1909 San Francisco V.D.B. cent to then become a rare coin. In 1913, he married Rose Heyman, and would end up having three kids. The mint though, allowed his intials back on for the 1918 cent only his time, they appeared above Lincoln's shoulders. The reverse of his coin, though, changed after the Wheat cent series ended. Currently, it is a shield barring the description E Pluribus Unum on it. Many years later he passed away on April 1st, 1924. Victor was only married for eleven years when he died. Today, Lincoln's head is stilled the same design that Victor David Brenner created to represent the 100th commemorative of Abraham Lincoln. Cent collectors, and even all U.S coinage collectors will remember the name Victor David Brenner as the well known wheat cent designer who put his intials, famously on the 1909 cents.

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14 Jul 2018

Book Review For The Coin Collector's Survival Manual, Revised Seventh Edition.

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

The author of the book, Scott A. Travers, (former ANA vice president) creates a book full of pointers and tips on making money off coins, avoiding counterfeit coins, graded coins, buying, selling, and more throughout the book. Over the coarse of the book, Scott helps the reader identify safe and secure transactions versus risky and dangerous buys. He well states the benifts of grading coins, and informs the reader on making profit through the "crack-out game". Content on the history of grading is also included. The book explains ways to get the best deals when buying, and getting the most money when selling a collection. Scott places forth his experienced knowledge on the gold and silver market as well as a simple United States and Canada silver coin melt value chart. This book gets four and a half stars. The Coin Collector's Survival Manual, Revised Seventh Edition is a book to go back to refer to at every step in a coin collector's journey. I would recommend this book to other people.

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14 Jul 2018

Book Review For Adventure Across The States National Park Quarters

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

In my opinion, this book does a fantastic job in covering base numismatic knowledge in less than one hundred pages. The start of the book well explains coin history, grading, proper storage, fundamental terminology, and types of coins in just few pages. A non collector could pick up the book and could know just as much as an average collector. The book than goes into the one thing some coin collecting pass over. The history. The author then goes into detail explaining why each national park is special, and all the historical action that has taken place at each one. Each national park is summarized up oustandly well in the few words written to describe for many, speechless places. It then continues on to give information about online clubs for beginners to join. I think this book deserves five stars because of all that was accomplished in this short, informative, and useful book. I believe it summarized each national park outstandingly well insuch few words. This book was an amazing numismatic read.

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12 Jul 2018

Ideas #1-5 For The ANA

Young Numismatists Exchange | user_86205

2) Online Library.Sadly, many people don't live close enough to use the American Numismatic Association library on a regular basis. Members are spread out all over the country. As they have made it possible for books to be shipped, today's prices of mailing items are extremely pricey. An online library will be used by all members, regardless of location. Through the online library,books could be borrowed from planes, car trips, or on a regular day anywhere. It would let all Young Numismatics the chance to have a book to review for YN dollars too.

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11 Jul 2018

Better Exploring National Coin Week

National Coin Week | user_86205

Personally, National Coin Week is my favorite section of the year that the American Numismatic Association hosts. Why? It is an enjoyable week of club bonding, rich history, and intriguing online trivia. It is also fun to compete in the writing contest as well as completing the youth activity. Let's take a better look at ways to get envolved when National Coin Week comes around.

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