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thatcoinguy's Blog

26 Sep 2021

Trimes

Coins-United States | thatcoinguy

The three cent piece (commonly referred to as a trime) was made from 1851-1889. The trime was made because the postal rate had just changed from five cents to three cents, and so this coin was an easy way to pay. The alloy was originally 75% silver, but in 1854, it was changed to 90% silver. The alloy was changed once more in 1865 to copper nickel, although circulation silver trimes were still minted until 1872. The change in alloy from silver to copper-nickel was to prevent the hoarding the trime and other silver coins went through during that time period.

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22 Sep 2021

Benjamin Franklin Half Dollars: A Personal Favorite

Coins-United States | thatcoinguy

Benjamin Franklin Half Dollars were struck from 1948-1963. It was the last full coin design change before the ones we are familiar with today. It was struck in 90% silver. This was the fifth coin with an actual person, and the first with a person who had not held office as a president. The obverse has a bust of Mr. Franklin, one of the most liked, and in my opinion, interesting founding fathers to this day. The reverse of this particular 50 cent piece has the Liberty Bell in all of it's cracked glory, along with a tiny Eagle, which is the smallest of our national animal ever depicted on a coin. The Ben Franklin Half Dollar has a reeded edge. The circulation strikes were struck at the San Francisco mint, along with the Philadelphia and Denver mints. The proofs were made by the Philadelphia mint, in addition to the circulation coins.

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20 Sep 2021

GSA Morgan Dollars

Coins-United States | thatcoinguy

When Morgan Dollars we're still in circulation (late 19th and early 20th centuries), they were actually not very popular! The public didn't like them, so many Morgan Dollar bags went into banks storage systems. Until the 1970s. The treasury ran an audit, and the long forgotten Morgan Dollars were uncovered. Soon, the General Services Administration (GSA) took hold of the project to get the Morgan Dollars out. Before the treasury found this hoard, the 1903-O Morgan Dollar was very rare. But now, it is very common in high grades. The hype built up, and soon there was lines of people with wheelbarrows trying to get ahold of a few bags worth of dollars. But after the sudden increase in demand, the lines slowly stopped, and the GSA still had a lot of Morgans (most of which were the Carson City kind) to get rid of.

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