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thatcoinguy's Blog

23 Oct 2021

Doubled Dies: An Overview

Young Numismatists Exchange | thatcoinguy

When I first started learning about coin collecting in late 2019, I saw my first doubled die in the red book (the famous '55). At the time, having no idea what a "die" was, I thought it was simply struck twice, the second time slightly off center. That seems to be a common misconception about doubled dies (DD), and I now know better. Hopefully, buy the end of this blog, you will truly understand what a doubled die is, and how it comes into existence.


The first thing you must know before I get into the technical terms is a few numismatic related vocabulary words. The first, is a die. A die is a tube shaped piece of metal, with a reversed design of the coin it is striking. It hits a circular piece if metal (better known as a planchet), creating a coin! That is my oversimplified version, and I suggest you dive a little deeper into dies with some further research, but that us all you NEED to know to read this blog. The second vocabulary term we will learn today is a master hub. The master hub strikes the design into the dies, which then strike the coins at the mints. Again, oversimplified. Do more research on your own time. Now, we can learn what a doubled die is.


A die (while it is being struck by the master hub) has to be struck multiple times. If one of the times it is struck off center, that creates a doubled die. The difference between a doubled die and a double strike is a double strike means the planchet is struck twice by the die, while, again. a doubled die is when the master hub strikes the DIE off center.


As it the die is struck more than twice, it is also possible to create tripled and even quadrupled dies. The value of the coin depends on the date, denomination, number of doubling, and, as with everything in life, demand and popularity. Abbreviations are as follows: Doubled die obverse (DDO), doubled die reverse (DDR), tripled die obverse (TDO), tripled die reverse (TDR), etc.


Chances are, unless the coin was minted recently, all of the different doubled dies have already been discovered. Doubled dies, unlike double strikes, are repeated until the error is discovered, or the die is taken out of use. Or both. That essentially means that if you find a doubled die in your pocket change (the chances are VERY slim), there are probably thousands, or even hundreds of thousands, of coins with the same doubled die as yours. That is why doubled dies found on older coins now are pretty much none existent. If the doubled die happened, somebody would have found at least ONE of the coins by now. Not saying it couldn't happen, but, like before, the chances are VERY slim.


Keep collecting,

thatcoinguy

Comments

Longstrider

Level 6

Good informative blog. Thanks.

Mike

Level 7

I have one comment! Thank you for theblog. You educated allot of yns that didn't know. I also used to tell them to look up the rest of the information. This teaches them more. Good blog.

AC coin$

Level 5

Pennies will go up in the market specially the ones with features....

thatcoinguy

Level 4

Come on, man! Don;t even call them “pennies” in the presence of me OR Mike.

Golfer

Level 5

Great information. Learning quite a bit, and wanting to start really searching my change.

CoinHunter

Level 5

Who knows, I might just find something extremely rare eventually! After all, RobFindsTreasure (on youtube) found an '09 S VDB 1C, 1976-D DDO-001 25c, and more.

CoinHunter

Level 5

He even got it graded as Genuine (details-environmental damage)

CoinHunter

Level 5

Look it up!

thatcoinguy

Level 4

Rob found an 09-S VDB?! Must have missed that one…

CoinHunter

Level 5

Well written blog! And nice pic of the '55 DDO! Ya, I haven't found a doubled die in my change quite yet.

CoinHunter

Level 5

LOL!

thatcoinguy

Level 4

Though I would be really jealous if you put up a blog with a nice AU DDO ‘55 as the cover picture next week…

thatcoinguy

Level 4

Lol. Yeah, I’m sure that’s your dream too. Oh well. Maybe we’ll get lucky.

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