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CoinHunter's Blog

17 Nov 2021

A Look At Coin Roll Hunting

| CoinHunter

(A draft that I was going to use for something else, but couldn't, so I figured I would post it on here)


Have you ever heard of people finding rare and valuable coin by searching through rolls of coins from the bank? I am here to tell you that it is possible to find valuable coins in circulation, give a brief guide of how to go about it, and then show you some examples of what I have found by coin roll hunting.


To begin this article, I am going to offer an adequate definition of coin roll hunting that I found on wikipedia: “Coin roll hunting (often abbreviated as CRH) is the hobby of searching and sorting coinage pulled from circulation for collectible coins. This is achieved through obtaining rolled coin, boxed coin, or bagged coin from banks and credit unions.”


Made plainly by wikipedia’s definition of coin roll hunting, the first step of coin roll hunting is sourcing a quantity of coins to search through. Whether it is simply pocket change, a neighbors coin jar, or rolls of coins from your bank, there is always a chance that you will find something cool. If you decide to get coins from your credit union or bank to hunt through, it is probably wise to start out with a smaller amount of rolls and work up from there. When searching through coins, there are a several different kinds of different “finds” to keep an eye out for. When searching through coins, the first things to look for are coins with abnormal designs on the obverse (heads side), the reverse (tails side), or both. Primarily, the coins that are going to stick out among any cents are coins that are older than 1959 and any coins made the year 2009. Any cents that are pre-1959 have a different reverse featuring decorative wheat stalks along the edges of the design and thus are commonly referred to as “wheat pennies.” While for the 2009 year, cents bear four different reverse designs portraying the different stages of Abraham Lincoln’s life. So, once you have hunted through a few rolls of cents and found and set aside a few interesting ones, what is next? In the case of most people, once they have tasted the excitement of finding “treasure” mixed in with normal, everyday coins, they only want to do it more. If this is you, you may consider attempting to hunt some rolls of other denominations. Moving on to nickels. In the nickel denomination there are three main kinds of coins to keep an eye out for. First, it is a wise idea to keep any nickels that have the 2009 date because they had low mintages and are very rare. The second thing to look for in nickels are silver nickels. Most people aren’t aware of this, but the US mint actually made partially silver nickels during the years 1942, 1943, 1944, and 1945. War nickels (as they are often called) were made to save nickel for the war effort and instead are 35% silver. There are two ways to differentiate these coins from normal, non-silver nickels, the first and most obvious way is that they have a slightly different reverse design consisting of a large ‘P’, ‘D’, or ’S’ above the Monticello building. The third and final thing to keep an eye out for among nickels are any buffalo nickels. These coins portray an Indian on the obverse, and a buffalo on the reverse and were minted from 1913-1938. Moving on to the dime denomination. The dime denomination doesn’t have a ton of finds to offer: only two. First you want to look for dimes dated 2009 because, like nickels, they had low mintages. And secondly, you will want to keep an eye out for any silver dimes. Any American dime older than 1965 is 90% silver and something that you definitely will want to set aside for its silver value. For the quarter denomination, you will want to look for essentially the same things as dimes: 2009s, silver (again, any coins older than 1965) but with a twist. During the years 2019 and 2020, the US mint produced special quarters to encourage people to look through their chance more. These special issues have a W mintmark on the obverse and were struck at the West Point Mint (which is abnormal because typical coins are struck at the Philadelphia or Denver mints) The half dollar denomination can be very productive, if you know what to look for. For half dollars, there are a couple of different things that can be found. First off, of course; you want to look for any silver ones. 90% silver half dollars are any coins dated 1964 or older, and 40% silver half dollars were minted from 1965 to 1970, so keep an eye out for those. Another thing to look for when hunting half dollars are NIFCs (Not Issued For Circulation), these are half dollars that were made for collectors only and that have low mintages, and were never intended to be spent. But since not everyone knows that they are rare, they still end up in circulation and should be kept if found.


Thanks for reading and have a great day! -CoinHunter

Comments

CheerioCoins

Level 5

I didn’t know about NIFC halves. maybe I’ll keep an eye out for them when I roll sort some halves. Thanks for the information!

thatcoinguy

Level 5

I’ve found a couple of NIFC halves, but I find there aren’t many dealers willing to pay a premium enough to save them. NIFC half dollars are cool finds, but not really worth saving. Great blog though!

CoinHunter

Level 5

I agree, I don't even keep all of the ones I find. I just keep the ones I need for my collection. Thanks.

Kepi

Level 6

Love to search through coin rolls! Nice blog! ; )

CoinHunter

Level 5

Thanks Kepi!

Golfer

Level 5

Roll hunting is a great way to find interesting coins. I need yo start searching.

CoinHunter

Level 5

You do! Thanks.

AC coin$

Level 5

Interesting information and Nice job .

CoinHunter

Level 5

Thanks.

Mike

Level 7

That program was supposed to get kids the opportunity to find them and get more interested in the hobby. What haopened. Ebay. Bulk buyers of quarters . Found box after his and sold them.. This caused many to get discureged. I was. The program was not as successful as they hoped. Ryder did it again. Thank the Lord he's gone. Most are still in circulation!. Good blog.

CoinHunter

Level 5

Thanks.

Longstrider

Level 6

Nice job fellow roll hunter. Good luck and Thanks.

CoinHunter

Level 5

Thanks a lot!

What do NIFCs look like?

Oh.

CoinHunter

Level 5

They are any half dollars minted from 2002-2020

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