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13 Jul 2020

Mercury Dime

Coins-United States | user_98698

The Mercury Dime was introduced in 1916 until it stopped being minted in 1945. This Dime replaced the previous Old Barber design for dimes that had been in use since 1892. This new design was created by A.A. Weinman. The obverse of this coin featured Liberty wearing a winged cap. Due to this similarity in appearance between the new dime design and the Roman God Mercury, the new dime became known as the “Mercury Dime”. Not only was the Roman God Mercury known as the God of Messages, but he was also the God of Financial Gain, pretty ironic for the name of a new design for the United States Dime. Also because of the resemblance to the Romano God the reverse depicts a Roman Fasces. The Roman Fasces contains an axe tied in a bunch of sticks and vines along with olive branches. The Roman Fasces is supposably to show the United States readiness to protect freedom while keeping peace.

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13 Jul 2020

The Indian Head Cent

Coins-United States | user_98698

The Indian Head Cent is first minted in 1859 following the short mintage of flying eagles and the last one was minted in 1909. The obverse of the coin shows an image of Liberty wearing a traditional Indian headdress, this gave the cent its name. The previous cent, the flying eagle, was difficult to mint and that was the main reason for switching to this easier to mint coin. Due to the strength of the copper-nickel blanks the coins could break due to the stress held within the blanks. However, this coin still presented many challenges and forced the designs to make early changes to the coin. This coin was one of the early introductions of a copper-nickel coin instead of the previous large cents that were made fully from copper. Technically the Flying Eagle is the first design of the Indian Head Cent, but many numismatics consider them to be two separate coins. As mentioned before, the obverse of the coin shows Liberty, while the reverse of the coins depicts a laurel wreath with “One Cent” in the center of it.

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01 Sep 2019

Draped Bust Cent

Coins-United States | user_98698

Draped Bust large cent was minted from 1796-1807 at the Philadelphia mint. There were not many coins made but there were many varieties. There were only 16,069,270 coins made. The coin was designed by Robert Scot. Its composition is mostly copper. The diameter is 29mm, and the weight is 168 grains(10.89 grams). The obverse has a bust of Liberty on the front. The bust of liberty has loose clothing on it, hence the name Draped Bust large cent. Draped Bust large cent was only minted at the Philadelphia mint meaning that there was no need for a mint mark on the coin. There are some years having 16 stars and some with only 13 stars. On the reverse of the 1795-1807 Draped Bust is the words “One Cent” inside of a civic wreath. Outside of the wreath is the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.”

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01 Sep 2019

Braided Hair Cent

Coins-United States | user_98698

The U.S. Braided Hair cent was minted from 1839-1857. The cent showed greater uniformity than the other coins that had come before it, this was because of the steam powered dies. The coin itself was designed by Chief Engraver Christian Gobrecht. Many people inside and outside of the mint did not like the overall design of the coin and criticized it. The coin was mostly criticized for the small head and silly, younger looking head with the appearance of leaning forward. The Obverse of the coin has the head of Liberty surrounded by 13 stars, for the 13 original colonies. On the reverse of the coin is the civic wreath surrounding the words “One Cent.” Outside of the wreath is the words “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.”

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26 Jul 2019

Coronet Hair Cent

Coins-United States | user_98698

The Coronet Head cent was minted from 1816-1839, at the Philadelphia mint. It was mostly made of copper. The U.S. mint bought copper planchets from the English supplier Boulton & Watt of Liverpool. When the war started the manufacturer stopped and the last of the blanks were made into “Classic Head” cents. Without any blanks, the mint was able to engrave a new obverse. The mint had been criticized before for earlier designs. When the “Classic Head” was introduced critics pointed out flaws. One big flaw was that the fillet on Liberty’s head was not worn by women in Classical times but was actually given to boy athletes who had won the town games. After feeling very embarrassed the mint redesigned the coin, now naming it “Coronet.”

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