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13 Jul 2020

Mercury Dime

Coins-United States | user_98698

The Mercury Dime was introduced in 1916 until it stopped being minted in 1945. This Dime replaced the previous Old Barber design for dimes that had been in use since 1892. This new design was created by A.A. Weinman. The obverse of this coin featured Liberty wearing a winged cap. Due to this similarity in appearance between the new dime design and the Roman God Mercury, the new dime became known as the “Mercury Dime”. Not only was the Roman God Mercury known as the God of Messages, but he was also the God of Financial Gain, pretty ironic for the name of a new design for the United States Dime. Also because of the resemblance to the Romano God the reverse depicts a Roman Fasces. The Roman Fasces contains an axe tied in a bunch of sticks and vines along with olive branches. The Roman Fasces is supposably to show the United States readiness to protect freedom while keeping peace.

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13 Jul 2020

The Indian Head Cent

Coins-United States | user_98698

The Indian Head Cent is first minted in 1859 following the short mintage of flying eagles and the last one was minted in 1909. The obverse of the coin shows an image of Liberty wearing a traditional Indian headdress, this gave the cent its name. The previous cent, the flying eagle, was difficult to mint and that was the main reason for switching to this easier to mint coin. Due to the strength of the copper-nickel blanks the coins could break due to the stress held within the blanks. However, this coin still presented many challenges and forced the designs to make early changes to the coin. This coin was one of the early introductions of a copper-nickel coin instead of the previous large cents that were made fully from copper. Technically the Flying Eagle is the first design of the Indian Head Cent, but many numismatics consider them to be two separate coins. As mentioned before, the obverse of the coin shows Liberty, while the reverse of the coins depicts a laurel wreath with “One Cent” in the center of it.

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