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user_99785's Blog

13 Jan 2021

1915 s Cent

Coins | user_99785

I'm considering adding to my collection an uncirculated 1915 s cent. Looking at the obverse, in the word Trust, the separation between the "s" and the "t" seems unusually wide. Is this a characteristic of this particular coin? I'm a novice collector but this jumped out at me right away. Everything else about the coin seems normal. Any help or insights would be appreciated. Thanks,

Comments

TheNumisMaster

Level 5

That seems normal to me. Check some examples online maybe? Good luck!

Longstrider

Level 6

Photos are needed here. Look it up in a Cherry Pickers Guide or NGC or PCGS.

Stumpy

Level 5

The spacing between the two does look a tad apart, but from my samples as well as photos it seems to be more visual than an actual separation. It is a sweet coin, it is not rare so price compare, costs run on the internet from $15 to well over $100.00. So decide what grade you want and shop around. Good luck and let us know what you get. Later!

CentSearcher

Level 5

If it's a good price then have at it. I don't think that is a variety or fake, unless it is very far apart. Let us know how it goes!

Mokie

Level 6

A picture would make it much easier to respond to your question. But I would simply do what others have suggested, look at a number of 1915S cents for sale on ebay and see how their TRUST compares.

Golfer

Level 5

Start looking at some for sale on EBAY or any other coin dealer site. They should all look about the same. If the one your looking at is totally different you either have somethings special or probably not a fake one. Plenty of coins for sale on ebay whether UNC. or not will tell the story. Let us know what you find out if you plan to buy it or not?

Mike

Level 7

I have some. They look ok to me. The letters. Nub knows that you better be safe than sorry. Good luck with them.

That's just what most earlier lincoln cents look like. 1915-S coins aren't usually the target of forgeries, but it's better to be safe than sorry.

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