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1913 Liberty V Nickel

This has probably been asked before, but I can't find a thread that might have it. If the 5 1913 Liberty V Nickels weren't authorized by the mint, how come they weren't confiscated?

2 months ago

One theory is that they were produced as trial pieces for 1913 in late 1912, before the design change was authorized. This would supposedly make them “authorized” mintages.

2 months ago

I investigated it for more years than I can count. A simple answer yes. Thousands want the government to take them back. I have information you wouldn't believe. Ask yourself this. If no one authorized them why did Samuel Brown sneak in and only make five. He wanted till the statues of limitations to expire seven years then the adds showed up. I said I would never get into it again. That's all I will say. By the way they did a piece on T.V. from the ANA and told the story. Mike.

2 months ago

Jimmy that was never true. The Buffalo was already designed and ready to go and it did.  Biggest scam in this hobby history. They will continue to sell so people can get there money back. I will contact you. Mike

2 months ago

Part of what makes numismatics so interesting.

2 months ago

The Mint confiscates whatever they feel like at any particular time, whether it be a 1933 Double Eagle or a pattern coin, while at the same time allowing a 1913 liberty nickel to "escape". 

2 months ago

It really does make no sense that they allow the 13 Nickels to remain in the wild while they still actively pursue the 33 Double Eagles.  There must be some arcane legal basis but I don't recall seeing it.  Maybe because the nickels were never officially minted like the Double Eagles or 64 Peace Dollars or etc. 

1 month ago
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