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Museum Showcase

Show attendees have the opportunity to see some of the world’s most beautiful and valuable coins, paper money and related numismatic treasures not seen anywhere else. The Museum Showcase features rare and historic items from the ANA’s Money Museum in Colorado Springs.


1861 Confederate Half Dollar

One of the great rarities in American numismatics, an original 1861 Confederate States of America (CSA) silver half dollar, will be a featured exhibit at the American Numismatic Association’s 2018 World’s Fair of Money®.

Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service www.PCGS.com

confederate coins
1792 half disme Rittenhouse



1792 Half Disme

The finest known 1792 Half Disme, graded PCGS MS-68, returns “home” for display at the ANA 2018 Philadelphia World’s Fair of Money, August 14-18, courtesy of ANA Governor Brian Hendelson.

Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service www.PCGS.com








Washington George appoints Elias Boudinot Director of US Mint Washington, George Appoints Elias Boudinot Director of US Mint

The October 28, 1795 document signed by President George Washington and Secretary of State Timothy Pickering appointing Elias Boudinot as the third Director of the United States Mint.

Photo courtesy of Brian Hendelson

George Washington appointment of David Rittenhouse as Mint Director George Washington Appointment of David Rittenhouse as Mint Director

The April 14, 1792 document signed by President George Washington and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson appointing David Rittenhouse as the first Director of the United States Mint.

Photo courtesy of Brian Hendelson



Jefferson Thomas President appoints Robert Patterson Director of US Mint Jefferson, Thomas President Appoints Robert Patterson Director of US Mint

The January 17, 1806 document signed by President Thomas Jefferson and Secretary of State James Madison appointing Robert Patterson as the fourth Director of the United States Mint.

Photo courtesy of Brian Hendelson

fake coins in fake holders

Counterfeit Coins

The Industry Council for Tangible Assets Anti-Counterfeiting Task Force will exhibit a five-case display of counterfeit coins, precious metals bars and grading holders during the World's Fair of Money. The counterfeit items are on special loan from the Cherry Hill, N.J., office of Homeland Security Investigations, U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Left, a fake 2011-W gold $50 Buffalo bullion coin in fake NGC holder. Right, fake 1922-S Saint-Gaudens $20 double eagle in fake PCGS holder. These fakes will be among those in the exhibit.


1861 Paquet Double Eagle

The finer of the two known 1861-P Paquet Reverse Liberty Head Double Eagles, graded PCGS MS-67 and from the Brian Hendelson Collection, will be among the Museum Showcase highlights at the ANA 2018 Philadelphia World’s Fair of Money, August 14-18.

Photo credit: Professional Coin Grading Service www.PCGS.com

Reverse Double Eagle
1943 bronze cent rectangle


1943 Bronze Lincoln Cent

A 1943 Lincoln cent mistakenly made of a bronze alloy instead of the zinc-coated steel being used to make pennies that year because copper was needed for World War II materials. It is being displayed courtesy of Philadelphia rare coin dealer Bob Paul (www.BobPaulRareCoins.com) who sold the coin for more than $1 million to an anonymous collector earlier this year.


Nova Constellatio Quint

The unique "Nova Constellatio Quint," an early American experimental silver coin recently pinpointed by researchers as the first coin struck under authority of the young United States government in 1783, nine years before the Mint opened. Once held by Alexander Hamilton, it is insured for $5 million and will be displayed courtesy of Kagin's, Inc. of Tiburon, California (www.Kagins.com)

nova constellatio quint
1913 liberty nickel



1913 Liberty Head Nickel

One of the five known 1913 Liberty Head nickels made under mysterious circumstances at the Philadelphia Mint and insured now for $3 million. It is owned by the American Numismatic Association.

Three 1933 Double Eagles/Previously Unknown Piece

The United States Mint will display three of the nation's 1933 Double Eagle Gold Coins at the World's Fair of Money. The display will feature two of the ten pieces recovered by the government in 2004. The Mint will also display the previously undisclosed specimen that was voluntarily and unconditionally given over to the government by a private citizen who requested to remain anonymous. 

double eagle 2

Collector Exhibits

The Collector Exhibits at ANA Conventions is one of the best attended and most interesting parts of the show. There are educational displays on every area of numismatics from ancient coins and artifacts, tokens and medals, world coins, to modern United States coins and paper money.

The individual creativity is rivaled only by the quality and variety of the items on display. Each display invites the viewer to Discover and Explore the World of Money.

Members are invited to share their knowledge, research, creativity and collections with other members and the general public at ANA's annual conventions by preparing and displaying a numismatic exhibit. Exhibits are divided into one of three groups:

  • Competitive: exhibits that are placed in classes according their content and theme. They are carefully evaluated by a team of dedicated judges, awarded points in areas such as "Numismatic Information," "Presentation" or "Degree of Difficulty" and compete for individual awards. Most exhibits on display fit into this category.

  • Non-competitive: exhibits that are not judged and not eligible for awards (except the People's Choice Award). ANA staff and convention officials may exhibit in this group.

  • Marquee: invitational, non-competitive, non-conforming exhibits that are used to enhance the exhibit area. This group includes exhibits from the ANA Money Museum.
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