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14 Oct 2017

Coin perfect. Show not!

Coins-United States | CoinLady

I do not remember when the first Kennedy half dollars were released, but I do remember that the public loved these coins and saved them. This pretty much ended the circulation of the half dollar.

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13 Oct 2017

1922 MS-63 VAM-7.1 DDR TOP 50

Coins-United States | Longstrider

This coin features two of my favorite things: Peace Dollars and VAM's. This particular VAM is in the Top 50. That is simply a list of 50 Peace Dollar varieties that are worth collecting and create a worthwhile set to acquire and own. It helps collectors of Peace Dollar varieties focus. The 1922 Peace Dollar has a mintage of 51,737,000. This makes it one of the most common. There is also a 1922 High-Relief and Satin Finish but they are so rare as to be non-existent for a normal collector. Anthony de Francisci was the designer with his wife Theresa posing as Miss Liberty. My coin is a MS-63. Graded by ANACS, which is probably the most common TPG for VAM's as they do the varieties the other graders will not. This VAM is a 7.1 which means , on the reverse, there is strong doubling on the eagle's right wing edge down the legwith slight doubling of the right leg. There is also fine diagonal polish lines above TRV on the obverse. These facts mean it was minted with the earliest die state, Die State 1. There is a bit of toning starting to appear on both sides of this coin. This VAM was discovered in 1993 by Joseph Feld. Anyone can discover a new VAMvariety. Keep looking and send it into the people at Vamworld. I hope you enjoy this coin as much as I do and learned something. Keep those comments coming. Thanks for looking.

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13 Oct 2017

YN Post-Auction Article Part 1: Prediction Edition

Young Numismatists Exchange | The Coin Student

The 2017 ANA's YN Auction has finally come to a close and many records and predictions have been met. From a 3,000 YN dollar coin to a 1,400 Red Book signed by Kenneth Bressett, the auction held a few surprises for its bidders. So without further ado here is the first part of my exclusive auction recap:

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11 Oct 2017

More Fun Facts...

| user_4449

The most counterfeited bill in the USA is the $20 bill, for it is not too suspicious and most nobody would take a second look. Next is the $100 bill, mainly counterfeited in other countries. 95% of all the new money being printed is used to replace U.S. dollars that wind up overseas. The U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing prints an average of 37 million bills a day. Most of the money printed is used to make up for currency already lost in circulation. The U.S. dollar is the most widely used currency in international transactions. All this printing requires 18 tons of ink per day. That’s like 9 elephants. The paper and the ink currently used to print money is the exact same that was used during the Civil war and is not paper, but a cotton blend, but now it was changed so that it would last longer, and therefore doesn’t have as much disease and stuff on it. Something about adding a slicker surface or something. Nine engravers produce all the plates, the planchets for currency, and all those plates are engraved in reverse. The U.S. Mint was the very first federal building built by the United States Government, and the coinage was struck using a decimal system created by Thomas Jefferson, who was the third president of the United States of America. The United State's largest mint is located in Philadelphia, which is the oldest being used, whose mintmark is either nonexistent or is a P. It covers over 5 acres. It was one of the few buildings that survived the great earthquake of 1906. Dollar bills are filthy, often turning up traces of Salmonella and E.coli. The older bills especially had more, because of the primarily cotton composition. The newer, slicker polymers had the least. In a study conducted by the University of Ballarat in Australia, scientist collected over 1,200 banknotes from various countries worldwide. The results showed that in the United States, the cleanest dollars hosted just 20 bugs, which the researchers refer to as a colony of forming units, or CFUs; the dirties dollars hosted well over 25,000. Most of the bacteria on the bills is completely harmless, but it is always a good idea to wash your hands after handling coinage or currency, especially if it is a lower denomination, for those usually have the most bugs.

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11 Oct 2017

More Fun Facts

| user_4449

A kind of funny fact about our penny is that it is actually not called the penny. It is the cent, or the one cent, coin. The penny is the British's name for their one cent. I turned in an article the other week and Sam Gelberd actually circled every time I said penny and drew arrows to the side of the paper and wrote, The British have pennies, we have cents. I had always thought that the small cent on all of my Whitman Penny folders was just for formality and their 'title' but I guess not. The first English coin to be known as a 'penny' was introduced around 790 A.D. by Offa, an Anglo-Saxon king. Back then it was made of silver, a pennies' worth of silver. Later it was stuck with an all copper composition. The first cents were all struck with an all copper composition back when the American Colonies had just become a country. They were huge, around the size of the current fifty cent pieces. Now, they are made mostly from zink and have little to no copper. The cent usually has 2.5% copper now. There are 100 British pennies to a British pound, just as there are 100 cents to our dollar. However 13 pennies equal 10 cents and 1 pound equals 1.31 dollars. Benjamin Franklin, to whom we owe the phrase "a penny saved is a penny earned," designed the first one cent coin in 1787. It was called a Fugio cent, and it showed a sun over a sundial and the phrase, "Mind Your Business" on the obverse. The reverse depicted the motto "We Are One," which was encircled by a chain with 13 links, each representing one of the 13 colonies. Later in 1793, the U.S. Mint designed their own version. Multiple efforts have been formed to abolish the cents in the U.S. - like what happened in Canada in 2012. I actually have bought things in Canada, and what they do is they round down to the nearest 5 cent, at least when you pay with cash. On the receipt, it would say total cost, then money saved with rounding or something like that. But, there were still pennies all over the ground. Today, it costs around double what a cent is worth to create it, because of the increased cost of metals used to make the planchets.

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11 Oct 2017

Now that's a Dimple!

Exonumia | Kepi

This is one impressive NGC slab! Measuring 6"x 8" and holds a 2010 5 oz. Silver 25 cent piece. The design features one of America's National Treasures... Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. With Old Faithful and a Buffalo, two icons of Yellowstone on the reverse and George Washington on the obverse. This one has been graded a MS 69 DPL "Dimple'". Which means Deep Mirrored Proof-Like or you can clearly see 6 to 8 inches of a clear reflection in the field. This coin is perfect for my collection... I love Buffalo's, America and lots of Silver!

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11 Oct 2017

Its been a while

Coins | Conan Barbarian

Its been a while since i last wrote a blog and a lot has happened since then. i got a few new coins (mostly silver quarter ranging in grades MS64-MS66 but also some Franklin and a couple MS66 wheat pennies) and expanding my collection in areas in which i am lacking (mostly silver coins). i also managed to sell all of my excess buffalo nickels which were either duplicates or undesirable. with that income i will hopefully find some great coins at the upcoming Whitman show in Baltimore and other local coin shows. i am also looking to buy more Dansco albums to store my better coins in and hoping to find discounted ones at the coin show or online and if anyone here knows of a website that has them for low prices i am open to options. Also i am about to move into a new house and spent the entire day yesterday packing up my collection into boxes ready to transport to the new house. i never realized until now how heavy a coin collection can get, all those hundreds and thousands of coins add up to quite a load. i hope to write more frequently in the coming months.

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10 Oct 2017

A WELL STRUCK "O" MORGAN? IS IT POSSIBLE?

Coins | Longstrider

Yes, it is possible. Most "O" or New Orleans mint Morgan Dollars are weakly struck. This, among other things, results in a flat chested eagle on the reverse. The breast feathers are almost lacking on some. I think this specimen shows a very well struck Morgan with defined eagle breast feathers. The 1885-O is one of the most common Morgan dollars in mint state. It had a mintage of 9,185,000 although untold millions were melted under the Pittman Act with more during the 1970's when silver prices rose. In 1938 the Treasury released 1,000 coin bags with millions more released between 1962-1964. I was luckly enough to find this specimen while looking for a 1885-O Morgan just for the mintmark to fill a hole in the Dansco album "Silver Dollar Date Set" # 7172. As you can hopefully see in the photos, there is some very nice toning on it. All in all I feel very lucky to find this MS-64 "O" Morgan with toning. A much nicer example than I was hoping for. Relatively cheap too. Thanks for looking. I look forward to your comments.

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10 Oct 2017

Ideas, please!

Coins-United States | CoinLady

I was inspired by the recent blog on modern US coin designs. I commented that the old designs have been in use for decades, and it's definitely time for a change. Check the figures...Lincoln on the cent since 1909, 108 years. Jefferson nickel, nearly 80 years. Roosevelt dime, 71 years, without any changes in design at all. Washington quarter, 85 years. Kennedy half dollar, 53 years.

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