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20 Feb 2019

NIKOLA TESLA-HUMAN GENIUS OR ALIEN?

Coins-World | Longstrider

This new blog is on, probably, my greatest hero outside of my immediate family, Nikola Tesla. The coin is one ounce .999 fine silver minted in the Serbian Mint for 2018. It has a 39.0 mm diameter. It has a value of 100 Serbian dinara. The total mintage is only 50,000.

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20 Feb 2019

Numismatic Book Review-Confederate Numismatica

| Big Nub Numismatics

Confederate Numismatica: tokens, political, coins, currency, medals, badges and ribbons with historical notes was written by Peter Bertram and was published in 2016. This book covers numismatic and related material during the era of the Confederate States of America. This author took time and effort to research into this topic and it shows. It is 200 pages but reading it is a light experience as it goes by very quickly. Anyone with an interest in the CSA should read this, a must read for collectors looking collect confederate currency and coins. It keeps the reader engaged and informed in a manner of style that you want to keep reading through the night. Worth the price, however some of the book is not on the coins and currency of that era, but it is still appreciated because you can now pair some coins with other historical items. An excellent read. 5/5

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19 Feb 2019

Coining Metals Part Four

| Big Nub Numismatics

Palladium: Palladium has been a relatively recent discovery by humans, compared to Gold and Silver which has been observed for thousands of years, Palladium was only discovered in 1803 and until very recently has stayed a more industrialized metal used for catalytic converters, much unlike the more usualcoining metals which were almost always used for trade and commerce. Palladium coins came from the unlikeliest places to be first be coined, Sierra Leon. Sierra Leon first minted Palladium coins in 1966 and otherunlikely countries minted them only a year later. Soon after these smaller countries began to mint Palladium coins the bigger countries started to and now palladium coins are minted from Russia to the USA. Palladium has recently put gold inthe rearview mirror and is worth about a hundred more dollars per ounce but coins minted on this metal are very beautiful.Krugerrands Philharmonics, and Queen's Beasts have been minted on them.

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18 Feb 2019

Presidents Day!

Coins | PastorK7354

A very Happy, Blessed Presidents Day for all of you. Hope you took a little time to survey your Presidents coins on this special day, as I did. Couldn't help myself and looked over my Franklin Halves too. ;-)

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17 Feb 2019

Learn Your Types: Standing Liberty Quarters

Coins-United States | iccoins

Last week I acquired a new 1923 Standing Liberty Quarter to add to my collection, which is what inspired me to write this blog. Designed by Hermon MacNeil, this is one of the most popular coin designs for collectors. The prices of these coins are generally much higher than other coins minted in the same time-period. The overall mintage of the Standing Liberty Quarter series is much lower than the popular Mercury Dimes and Buffalo Nickels. From 1916 to 1924, the dates wore off much sooner than any of the details. This is because the date is the highest part on early date Standing Liberty Quarters. This led to extreme difficulties for grading companies, like PCGS and NGC, as well as collectors and dealers. There is essentially only one that that is required to grade coins. That is that the coin must be identifiable by year, denomination, series, variety, etc. Unfortunately, many of the earlier Standing Liberty Quarters ended up “ungradable.” Coins that may normally be a good, or sometimes even a very good example, may be ungradable simply because of the lack of the date. From 1925 to 1930, the date was recessed, which was very beneficial. The coins weigh 6.25 grams and are composed of 90% silver and 10% copper.

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17 Feb 2019

4 Most Valuable Small Cents

Coins-United States | iccoins

To many people, a “penny” is worth just 1 cent. It’s a coin that, with only one, you could buy absolutely nothing with, except maybe a paperclip from someone on the street. Little do some people know, some cents are so valuable that you could use just one to pay for a nice house or pay off your exceedingly expensive student loans from college. This list goes in order of date. They do not go in any particular value order.

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