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13 Jun 2021

An Unusual Year

Coins | Long Beard

As collectors there are certain coins which captivate us, coinsknowinglyin our minds we may not possess whether by price or availability. Those fortunate enough to have been blessed as the caretaker of such important and historic pieces tend to hold such pieces for many years, passing them on to heirs, hidden in the physical sense only to be enjoyedby the massesin the digital . More often than not, said pieces are traded in private among like collectors with little or no knowledge by the average collector. Yet on occasion these treasures find their way to auction, for various reasons, after many years in private care. Thus far2021 has been an unusual year as several have appeared and found new caretakers, setting records above and beyond expectations. The only "legal" 1933 Saint-Guadens Double Eagle selling for 18.9 million, the finest known 1787 Brasher Doubloon and an 1822 Half Eagle to sight a few. And next, the subject of this week's blog, the finest known 1804 Dollar consigned to the Stack's and Bower auction being held at the ANA World's Fair of Money in Rosemont, Illinois August the twelfth. Enjoy!

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12 Jun 2021

Getting into numismatics

Coins | user_72008

Im am enjoying collecting coins this past week. I have met with a coin collector who owns a shop. I have been collecting 20th century type coins with my brother and father, and also the state quarters. Overall, I am enjoying getting into Numismatics.

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12 Jun 2021

SUMMER VACATION!

| Eriknation

SUMMER VACATION! I will be going to some national parks until Wednesday. And yes, I will still be updating my blog. I'll share some stuff I did after I come back. I might as well write about the America the Beautiful national park series because I'm going to some national parks.eric

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11 Jun 2021

WHAT IS A CONDER TOKEN??

Tokens | Mike

Hi everyone. Many of you have heard of read blogs on Conder Tokens. Some have never heard of them. I will try to keep it simple. Back in the 18th century Britain was in very bad shape financially. With the wars they had they were near bankrupcy. Now what happened next is they started to make these tokens. Just like we did in the Civil War. The difference they had terrific die sinkers and manufacturing. Now I will not list all of the great die sinkers I will tell you about Peter Kempson.. He was one of them. Now a person by the name of Conder noticed these showing up and he was the first to document them. They became Conder tokens. Now the purpose was to be able to buy things. On the edge there was a writing on most but not all. They made half penny's and pennys. The edge writing would tell you were you could exchange these for products. And also the price of the token. These tokens were made of famous people famous sites political and for buying goods. The token you see below is the Soho Mint. They made most of them there a few were made privately. Now your in the 1700' s to make a token wasn't easy . Just the die would take time. The Soho Mint and below made 80 tokens at a time. They used steam presses. And they came out beautiful. I have a set it took five years to put together. It has 19 tokens and they were made by P. Kempson. He also made a set of England thirty two tokens. I have never heard of a set of these. They would be worth a fortune. He made this set of Coventry England.famous gates that protected the city. Famous buildings. He has four reverses plus the fifth the Handel reverse. Three he would put a period after certain letters. Then he made the very rare Handel reverse. There will never be a set of that. They were very rare. The workmanship got my attention. The set I put together is the only one known. N.G.C. agreed but couldn't put it on the label . So instead they put my name on them. It took two years to find the last one. They grade from MS 63 to MS 66 with some red brown and a proof like. . These tokens are 244 years old and look like they were made yesterday. The token below shows the token how I bought it. I knew it would grade MS. I sent it in and N.G.C. contacted me saying there was something on it and they could remove it. The graded one is what it looks like after cleaning. This one is not in the set. . There are so many of these Conder tokens. You ask what are they worth. Some hundreds of pounds. The George Washington's token graded MS 61 sold for 25,000 dollars. Yes they have very good prices. But then again your buying art on Copper and bronze. They have so much history. Such workmanship. You can count the bricks and the windows. The cobble stones. This was there tallent.. The token below is of Cardinal Worsely. If you watched the Tudors the story they told of him was not right. Henry the VIII actually liked him . He did not have him imprisoned and he did not kill himself. The gate was dedicated to him he was born in Ipwitch! Many of these were sold at the time to collector's who kept them in this condition. My set is on the web put in complete Coventry set tokens it should come up. Well I hope you enjoyed this. Those of you who want to learn more I will be happy to help. Just send a message. I'm in an auction now for a very special token. Once a week. Druids Revenge sells them in ebay. Take care be well!

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09 Jun 2021

FIFTY STATES OF COINAGE- Part 26- Montana

Coins-United States | coinfodder

Well, sooner or later, Montana will be the next California- crowded as the rich move from New York and Los Angeles to Montana, the last relatively uninhabited space in the Continental United States. If you have time, visit before the influx of people ruin the state's beauty. I went to Beartooth Pass in Montana (well, Wyoming, but close enough) and Yellowstone, and words where lost on the landscape.

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