Login

Mike 's Blog

27 Jul 2021

More Conder Tokens

Tokens | Mike

Hi. Yes this will be a short blog on some of the buildings on Kempson tokens. The ones I chose today are a few of the buildings still standing from the time they were built. Some are so good it looks like Kempson took a picture of them.. The best part is the years these buildings were put up. I'm not talking 1797. Some of these were built in the 1300's the 1500's. and so on. Just think of that for a moment. The English were excellent record keepers so the dates were not just put on these. You can say some went over rehabilitation but the original face of the structure is the same. Now Kempson almost seems like he knew these would still be around for hundreds of years even some of the gates that protected the city still stand. They are beautiful works architecture. The wall that encircled the city parts still stand. Doing research I said I wonder if some of these are still standinng. I went to work and i was surprised. St.John's church later became St.John's High School. I wrote a journal of these at N.G.C. A few days later I get a message from a fellow collector . He said I went to St John's school there I grew up in Coventry.. Small world. I asked him if he or if he knew of others that lived there if they had any of these tokens. He said none. Passed down from his family he was told they used them. Now I bet if I continued I will find more. This is something I thought of after the set was finished. The other tokens I collect many are still standing. Not just Kempson but others. Cathedrals ,government buildings. If you check Kempson other set of building of London many still stand. Some were destroyed in WW. 11. Hitler had an obsession with Coventry. He bombed it a lot. One famous Cathedral. St. Paul's he wanted destroyed. He felt it be could level this Cathedral it would take the resolve from the people and he could take England. He sent over 200 bombers and St.Paul's still stands. The people stayed inside and put out the fires. It was built if I remember by Wren. It's in the heart of London. One thing NGC graded many Red Brown the token below it looks like the lights are on!! St.Marys Sorry I got it the topic. That's ok the two are connected. St. John's token and picture like I said look so much alike. The same with Bablake and St. Mary's Hall. St. Mary's is used as a catering hall today and ceremonies. If you look at the token and the picture there is a wonderful likeness. . I will end this short blog on these wonder tokens and buildings. I hope.you see the talent of this man. We need people like this working today the old way. The way commens were done and older.coins. No lasers here.!!Be well be safe!!

READ MORE
06 Jul 2021

More On Conder Tokens

Tokens | Mike

Well my friends. I decided to write another blog on these beautiful arts in copper. They tell many story's . Story's about how it was to live in 18 century England. We're the Monarchy said no silver no gold. How were they going to survive. Britain was involved in Many wars and even a civil war. They had no money to speak of. Sure the King and Queen had there gold and silver. They even allowed some coinage to be made. This was the time of George The 111. Yes the battle for our Independence had much to do with this. There is one particular token it looks like a church. Built around 1340 . It's name was St. Johns. I wrote a journal about it at N.G.C. Shortly after I get a message from a fellow collector. Not only did he live in Coventry he went to that same building during high school. Sure it was probably refurbished but the outside is still the same . That's only 678 years. Coventry was bombed during WW 11. Many of the gates and buildings survied. So to get back to the tokens Matthew Boulton had built the SoHo mint. Now Britain was way ahead of other country's as far as coins were made. The Soho Mint operated on steam presses. They made 80 a hour. But it probably took weeks to make the dies. They had great engravers. That's why there are so many of these tokens. On the edge it would say where you could redeem these tokens. But collectors also noticed the workmanship and collectors noticed this and collected them . That's why so many are in MS after 224 years and longer. I found one of the first made in 1761 by a man called.Toke. He owned a farm and made thess. It was located in Kent. Depending on what the edge writing said ment how much they are worth today. That's why you will see a reference number like 214 a, b ,c. Let's say b they only made so many that meant it was worth more. There is another token below that has George Fredrick Handel. Peter Kempson made a set of Coventry tokens with just him on the reverse. He was loved in Britain but born in Germany.. Those go for a very high price today because they are very rare. . I know I'm all over on these. But you get the idea. They were used for money. The were made in a half penny and one penny. They were collected. They helped a country that was close to bankruptcy. Me I was lucky to find these. Look at one with a loop and count the bricks even the cobble stones in the street. The best part is there are still those in Red and Brown. One I have is proof like. To get a coin made today to be proof like takes allot of work . I believe this one was first of the die. They saved Britain I believe. . The prices of these have gone up allot. I have to stand back and say how bad do I want this.. There sold.raw at auctions. The quality ones.. There are still many. I could go on and on about these. Conder collectors do not slab there tokens. But the ones that are so beautiful should be. I believe in protecting them. I hope you enjoyed this. They do have classes on these at the ANA. They were made into the twentieth century. I will write a blog on those . Take care be safe and be well. Please enlarge PICTURES!!!

READ MORE
We use cookies to provide users the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you agree to receive all cookies on money.org. You may disable cookies at any time using your internet browser configuration. By continuing to use this website, you agree to our privacy policy and terms of use. To learn more about how we use cookies and to review our privacy policy, click here.