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27 Jul 2019

Book Review: Ancient Coins Were Shaped Like Hams and Other Freaky Facts About Coins, Bills, and Counterfeiting & 1 more

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

This is a coin book review for (as it says in the title :) ) Ancient Coins Were Shaped Like Hams and Other Freaky Facts About Coins, Bills, and Counterfeiting. This book was written by Barbara Seuling, and illustrated by Matthew Skeens. It is forty pages long, with illustrations, although, just to be clear, they are illustrations, not actual pictures. :) The book is both amusing and informative, with interesting and little known facts all throughout. Besides the ancient coins were shaped like hams one, there is also the interesting, and slightly odd fact that United States paper currency used to be sent to a launderer to be washed, ironed, and dried, so that the bills would have a longer life span, and look better too. Isn't that an interesting one?! This book, even though my library keeps it in the juvenile section, and some of the illustrations lean towards the cartoony side, is an interesting, amusing, and informative read, for any collector of any age. You might laugh at some of the illustrations, but I am sure that you will learn something. I recommend this book for anyone who wants to learn little known facts or interesting trivia bits.The other book featured in this book review is called The Instant Coin Collector: Everything you Need to Know to Get Started Now. It is written by Arlyn G. Sieber, and is a fantastic book. Although there is no way to become an "instant" collector (everything takes practice and a bit of learning), it is still a good book. It literally teaches you everything you could need to know to get started in the amazing and fabulous world of coin collecting/numismatics. It is 255 pages long, and is crammed full of information and tips of the trade for everything from picking your coin, to grading your coin, to storing your coin, to protecting your coin, and more. The entire starting journey is laid out for you in the pages of this book, and there are helpful photos in the book. I recommend this book mainly for beginning collectors, although, maybe more experienced collectors could learn something from it too. I can't really be the judge of that, that is all up to you guys. :)I hope these book reviews are helpful to anyone reading, and that, if you read the books, you enjoy them. :)

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27 Jul 2019

The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage, Part 9 (Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, Bonnie and Clyde, and more!)

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

Well, this is the last post in the wild west coinsetinspired series. Who knows what serieswillcome after this. This last post is on Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, Bonnie and Clyde, and theSundanceKid. These are all famous characters from our nation's history, and all five names are rather well known. Practically everyone has heard about them, and knows who they are. (I will try to keep the bios as short as I can.) :) WildBillHickok is up first...

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23 Jul 2019

The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage, Part 8 (Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, Bonnie and Clyde, and more!)

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

Well, this is the last post in the wild west coinsetinspired series. Who knows what serieswillcome after this. This last post is on Wild Bill Hickok, Buffalo Bill Cody, Bonnie and Clyde, and theSundanceKid. These are all famous characters from our nation's history, and all five names are rather well known. Practically everyone has heard about them, and knows who they are. (I will try to keep the bios as short as I can.) :) WildBillHickok is up first...

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20 Jul 2019

The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage, Part 8 (Annie Oakley, Calamity Jane, Stagecoach Mary, and Tom Horn)

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

This is blog post number eight in the Wild West series. I know Isaid last post thatthere would be only one more after that, butbecause of the length of the bio section in the last post being a littleridiculous :), I am going to split this last one into two. That way the biosection isn'toverwhelming. :) The posts will have a few facts on the people, that way it isn't that much history. :)The series has been focusing on a set of 23 JFK half dollars that have had images of "the most famous Wild West figures in the world" color screened onto the obverse of the coin. I put the description of the coins in parentheses at thebottom of the post, if you missed it in the last one, that way you don't have to go searching for that post. :) This blog post is going to featureAnnie Oakley, Calamity Jane, Stagecoach Mary, and Tom Horn. (Some of the "bios" will be longer than others, if they are really famous outlaws that have a lot of things to condense) :)

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15 Jul 2019

Coin Book Review, The Coin Collectors Survival Manual, Revised 7th Edition

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

I want to post this book review to let you guys know about a fantastic numismatic book. This book is called "The Coin Collectors Survival Manual, Revised 7th Edition." It is by Scott A. Travers, and it is fantastic. The New York Times called it "One of the most importantcoin books ever written." It is 402 pages long, with 16 pages on top of that number of full color images of certain special coins.There are sections in the book for absolutely everything you need to know about coins. From Collecting Coins Profitably, to Reading a Coin Like a Book, to Grading, Cherrypicking, Shows, Dangers of Buying Coins on the Internet and by Mail, Selling your coins, Securing your coins, Protecting your coins, and more. There's also a helpful glossary, and index, and there are also several helpful appendices (Value Chart for U.S. and Canadian Silver Coins, Value Chart for Commonly Traded U.S. Coins and World Gold Coins, Specifications for American Eagle Silver and Gold Bullion Coins, Internet Resources, and Calamity Insurance: Gold Coins as a Safe Haven). There are the 16 full colorpages photos of coins, but all throughout thebook there black and white photos of coins that the author either references, or uses as an example to prove his point, for whatever he is talkingabout in that particular chapter.This book also holds a special place with me, because this book was what led me to the ANA and the YN group. I read the entire book, cover to cover, and, on page 260, a section called "Youth Programs" began. I read it. It was all about the YN program with the ANA (I read this book for the first time, cover to cover, when I wastwelve...) :) and I was instantly hooked on the idea. It gave glowing descriptions of the many fun things to do with the ANA and the YNs, and the many educational opportunities, that sounded like a lot of fun. So, thanks to this book, I went on to www.money.org and looked at the YN section. A little later, I sent in a report card and joined the ANA! This book was what introduced me to the amazing world of the ANA, and because of that (among other things that is, there are lots of other things in the book that also make it qualify), it is one of my all time favorite coin books.I highly suggest this book for anyone out there who wants to: Expand their knowledge about the hobby, learn great tips and tricks for both buying and selling coins, just have fun reading both interesting stories, and insider knowledge, or people who are just starting out with the hobby and want to learn as much as they can. This book has something for everyone out there in the coin world.

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15 Jul 2019

The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage, Part 7 (Pearl Hart, John Wesley Hardin, Clay Allison, and more!)

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

This is blog post number seven in the Wild West series. What I'm going to do to wrap up the series, is two posts, each of which will have a few facts on the people, that way it isn't that much history. :)The series has been focusing on a set of 23 JFK half dollars that have had images of "the most famous Wild West figures in the world" color screened onto the obverse of the coin. Colorizing coins involves a unique application of special inks directly to the surface of a coin using a unique and painstaking process, that achieves a level of detail, color saturation, and durability that is #1 in the industry.The color screening was done by the Merrick Mint, which is said to be the leading Mint when it comes to color screening coins. The coins are legal tender, although why anyone would want to spend them is beyond me... :) The set features prominent figures in the history of the Wild West, from the greatest outlaws in American Western History, to the first female African American postal carrier in the United States. The coins have a beautiful quality to them, even if some people do not like color screening, these coins do do the process justice. Each image on the coins is styled like an old wanted poster that has been hung up on a wooden wall with knot holes in it. The wooden walls have faint outlines of cacti on them. On the "wanted poster" in the middle of the "wall," at the top of it are the words "WILD WEST" in red letters. Above the words "WILD WEST" are four tan stars. Below the words is a picture of whatever outlaw or famous figure that is being featured on the coin, and below their photo is their name, whether that be their given name, or their outlaw name. The pictures of the people are actual pictures of them, therefore they are either black and white, or brown on darker brown. The only coin that differs from this description is the one on the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. This one has a full color image of the O.K. Corral, and the four gravestones of the men who died in the gunfight. It has tan stars all around the upper left edge of the coin, and then below the stars it says "GUNFIGHT AT THE" in white cursive script, below that, in the same red font letters as the words "WILD WEST" on the other coins, it has the words "O.K. CORRAL". Below those words, it says "OCTOBER 26, 1881, TOMBSTONE, ARIZONA" in white block letters. So those are the coins, described the best that I can because I don't yet know how to post a photo with my blog post (sorry). Hopefully those descriptions help you picture the coins in your mind. :)This blog post is going to feature Pearl Hart, John Wesley Hardin, Clay Allison, Jim "Killer" Miller, Geronimo, Fred Waite, and Jesse James. (Some of the "bios" will be longer than others, if they are really famous outlaws that have a lot of things to condense) :) So let's start with Pearl Hart:

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13 Jul 2019

The ANA is Amazing

| ZanzibarCoins

I just want to say thank you to everyone on the ANA, both those who run it and make sure that it goes smoothly and is fun and informative for all of us collectors on here, and for those who are on here who are active and helpful to all of the other collectors. This is a place where we can learn and grow, and help each other, no matter how old or young, experienced or inexperienced we may be. I truly enjoy the abilities I have to be on here, and I really enjoy that I can learn and grow among so many other people who share the same passion for coins and other numismatic items that I have. Y'all are amazing! Thank you all!

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13 Jul 2019

The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage, Part 6 (Butch Cassidy)

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

Here we go! Part six of the series! To avoid any confusion, I am going to say this every post in this series. :) These blog posts focus on a set of 23 JFK half dollars. (If you want to see them I put a link to aphoto of them in post #5 of the series.) :)Anyways, part six features famous outlaw Butch Cassidy.Butch Cassidy wasbornRobert Leroy ParkeronApril 13, 1866, although he is better known asButch Cassidy. Hewas a U.S. train robber and bank robber, and the leader of a gang of criminal outlaws known as the "Wild Bunch" in the U.S. Old West. Cassidyparticipated in criminal activity for more than a decade at the end of the 19th century, but eventually, the pressures of being pursued by law enforcement (notably the Pinkerton Detective Agency)forced him to flee the country. He fled with his "partner-in-crime" Harry Alonzo Longabaugh, much better known as the "Sundance Kid", and Longabaugh's girlfriend Etta Place. The trio traveled first to Argentina and then to Bolivia, where Parker and Longabaugh are believed to have been killed in a shootout with police on November 7, 1908; however, as is the case with the story of many western outlaws and legends, the exact circumstances of their fate continue to be disputed. Cassidy's life and death has been extensively dramatized in film, television, and literature, and he remains one of the most well-known icons of the "Wild West" mythos in modern times.Cassidy/Parker was born in Beaver, Utah, as the oldest of 13 children. His parents, Maximillian Parker and Ann Campbell Gillies were British immigrants, and they had become Mormons while stilllivingin England and Ireland.Maximillian Parker was 12 years old when his family arrived in Salt Lake City,in 1856, as Mormon pioneers.Ann Gillies was born and lived in Tynesidein northeast England before emigrating to the U.S. with her family in 1859 at the age of 14.The couple was married in July of 1865.Cassidygrew up on his parents' ranch near Circleville, Utah, which isapproximately 215 miles (346km) south of Salt Lake City.Butch Cassidy's first criminaloffensewas a minor one. Around 1880, he journeyed to a clothier's shop in another town, but found it closed when he arrived. He entered the shop (breaking and entering) and stole a pair of jeans and some pie (theft).However, heleft a note, which promised he would payforthejeansand the pie on his next visit. The clothier pressed chargesanyway, despite the note, but Cassidy was acquitted by a jury. He continued to work on ranches until 1884, when he moved to Telluride, Colorado, supposedlyseeking work, but possibly to deliver stolen horses to buyers. He led a cowboy's life inWyomingand Montana,before returning to Telluride in 1887.Whileback in Telluride, he met Matt Warner, who owned a racehorse. Cassidy and Warner raced the horse at various events, dividing the winnings between them.Cassidycommittedhis first bank robbery on June 24, 1889. He, Warner, and two of the McCarty brothers robbed the San Miguel Valley Bank in Telluride, and they stole approximately $21,000 (which was around 586,000$ in 2018). Aftertherobbery, they all fled to Robbers Roost, which was a remote hideout in southeastern Utah.In 1890, using his share of the stolen money mot likely, Cassidy purchased a ranch that sat on the outskirts of Dubois, Wyoming.This location is across the state from the notorious Hole-in-the-Wall, which wasa natural geological formation, and a popular hideout for outlaw gangs, including Cassidy's during the era. It is possible that Cassidy's ranching was a façade for clandestine activities, perhaps with Hole-in-the-Wall outlaws, as he was never financially successful at ranching.His ranch used the "unmistakable brand" of "Reverse-E, Box, E".In early 1894, Cassidy became involved romantically with outlaw and rancher Ann Bassett. Her father was a rancher who did business with Cassidy, supplying him with fresh horses and beef. That same year, Cassidy was arrested in Lander, Wyomingfor stealing horses, and possibly for running a protection racket(providing protection to a business or other group through violence outside the sanction of the law)among the local ranchers there. He was imprisoned in the Wyoming State Prison in Laramie, Wyoming,where he served 18 months of a two-year sentence; he was released and pardoned in January 1896 by Governor William Alford Richards.He became involved briefly with Ann Bassett's older sister Josie, but then hereturned to Ann.Cassidy associated with quite a wide circle of criminals, most notably his closest friend, William Ellsworth "Elzy" Lay, Harvey "Kid Curry" Logan, BenKilpatrick, Harry Tracy, Will "News" Carver, Laura Bullion (hey look, a numismaticrelated last name) :), and George "Flat Nose" Curry. This groupbecame the so-called "Wild Bunch". The gang assembled some time after Cassidy's release from prison in 1896 and took its name from the Doolin-Dalton gang, which wasalso known as the "Wild Bunch".On August 13, 1896, Cassidy, Lay, Logan, and Bob Meeksrobbed the bank inMontpelier, Idaho, escaping with approximately $7,000. Cassidy ended up recruiting Harry Alonzo Longabaughinto the gang soon after. Lognbaugh is better known as "The Sundance Kid".Ann Bassett, Elzy Lay, and Lay's girlfriend Maude Davis all joined Cassidy at Robbers Roost in early 1897. The four hid there until early April when Lay and Cassidy sent the women home so that the men could plan their next robbery. They ambushed a small group of men carrying the payroll of the Pleasant Valley Coal Company on April 22, 1897, in the mining town of Castle Gate, Utah. They stolea sack from them containing $7,000 in gold. Taking the gold and the payroll, the men fled back to the Robbers Roost.On June 2, 1899, the gang robbed a Union Pacific Overland Flyerpassenger train near the town of Wilcox, Wyoming. Thisrobbery earned them a great deal of notoriety. It also resulted in a massive manhunt.Many notable lawmen (too many notable lawmen to list actually) :) took part in the hunt, but they never found anyone in the gang.On July 11, 1899, Lay and others were involved in a Colorado and Southern Railroadtrain robbery nearthetownof Folsom, New Mexico (they really don't wait that long in between robberies do they?),which Cassidy might have planned and personally directed. A shootout ensued with local law enforcement, during which Lay killed Sheriff Edward Farr and Henry Love; Lay was then convicted of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment at the New Mexico State Penitentiary.The Wild Bunch would typically separate following a robbery and flee in different directions, then they would reunite later at a predetermined location such as the Hole-in-the-Wall hideout, Robbers Roost, or Fannie Porter's brothel, located in San Antonio, Texas.In 1899, Cassidy approached the Governor of Utah, Heber Wells,to negotiate an amnesty. Wells advised him to ask the Union Pacific Railroadto drop their criminal complaints against him, and the chairman of the Union Pacific Railroad, E.H. Harriman,attempted to meet with Cassidy through Matt Warner. However, on August 29, 1900, Cassidy, Longabaugh, and others robbed the Union Pacific train No. 3, near the town of Tipton, Wyoming. This violated Cassidy's earlier promise to the Governor of Utah, and successfully ended any chance for an amnesty.

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13 Jul 2019

The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage, Part 5 (The Apache Kid)

Young Numismatists Exchange | ZanzibarCoins

All right! Part five of the series! First of all, just to remind everyone (and to avoid the confusion that happened last post...), these blog posts focus on the set of 23 JFK half dollars. If you want to see the coins (since I cannot for the life of me figure out how to post photos on here, no matter what I have tried), here is a link that will take you to a photo of the set:https://www.ecoins.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/600x600/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/w/i/wildwest23set.jpgIt's really, really long, and you may have to copy and paste it into your web browser to get it to work, but there you go. :)Anyways, part five features an outlaw named the Apache Kid. So here we go! :)The Apache Kid's given name is Haskay-bay-nay-ntayl (which means "the tall man destined to come to a mysterious end."), although he is better known as the Apache Kid. He was born sometime in the 1860s (exact date is unknown), in Aravaipa Canyon. He was born into one of the three local groups of the Aravaipa/Arivaipa Apache Band (in Apache: Tsee Zhinnee- "Dark Rocks People) of San Carlos Apache, which is a subgroup of the Western Apache People. He was said to be the fiercest Apache out there besides Geronimo! He became a member of what the U.S. Government called the "SI Band", and he developed important skills, became a famous and respected scout and later became a notorious renegade, active in the borderlands of the U.S. states of Arizona and New Mexico in the late 19th and possibly also the early 20th centuries. Both his year of birth and his year of death are unknown, although he is believed to have been born sometime in the 1860s. His year of death is generally given as 1894, but multiple New Mexico cattle ranchers claimed that he was alive until the late 1930s. The "Apache Kid Wilderness" in New Mexico is named after him. Also, interestingly enough, he was honored with a character in none other than the Marvel Comics named after him (The Apache Kid. However there is no other connection than the name).

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05 Jul 2019

The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage, Clearing up a Misunderstanding :)

| ZanzibarCoins

Just so y'all know, the blog post series that I have been doing recently, called "The Wild West and Its Inspired Coinage" is about a set of 23 Kennedy half dollars. So it does actually focus on coins, although I will admit that that may not have been clear in the most recent post. (Sorry about that!) :)Just to clear up the misunderstanding, here is the first bit of my first post in the series, copied and pasted into here:"The Wild West has long fascinated many Americans. (I don't know if anyone on here has noticed, but I it interests and fascinates me a lot too) :) It has been the scene for many a movie. The setting for many a dime novel, novel, or Western movie that thrilled audiences both fifty + years ago and now. For some it's the wide open country side and the beauty of the sky or the mountain or the vistas and bluffs that the characters find themselves traveling on. For others it's the intrigue, the suspense, and the knowledge that the "good guy" will win, it's only a question of "How?". For others it's the bravery, the sacrifice, and the courage of the "good guy" or the good heart behind the cold exterior of the outlaw that's going to eventually surface and save the day. For some it's all of those combined. And yet there are still many, many other reasons why people enjoy Westerns, and the Wild West, and the whole idea of it all in general.

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