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Mokester's Blog

26 Aug 2019

A Semi-Official Proof CC Half Dollar

Exonumia | Mokester

As some of you may have read in the trade publications or online, the Nevada State Museum in Carson City, Nevada has fired up their old Coin Press #1 and have made beautiful copies of the 1870 CC Seated Half Dollar. Now Coin Press #1 has an interesting history and was responsible for minting all CC coins from 1870 through 1875. According to information provided by the Nevada State Museum, Coin Press #1 had its Arch recast due to a crack by workers at the Virginia and Truckee Railroad Yard. Once they completed the repair, they replaced the original manufacturers data plate with one that read "Virginia and Truckee RR Works. Carson, Nev. 1878.". So even though Coin Press #1 did service in San Francisco and Denver (during the transition from Silver to Clad coinage), it has always been a tied closely with the CC mintmark and Nevada. So why was this medal created? Because Nevada is celebrating its 150th Anniversary of Statehood and lots of interesting things are being done to commemorate that momentous event. The Nevada State Museum, which is housed in the old Mint Building, thought it would be appropriate to also honor that event by reproducing the 1870 CC Half Dollar in beautiful proof. The total mintage is 3000, the reproduction was sculpted by Tom Rogers, a retired Mint Engraver, and the silver used in the medals is from Nevada, .999 fine. Someone mentioned to me that they wish the word COPY was smaller and also on the reverse. I don't disagree with the smaller but I do like it on the obverse as the medal is most interesting because of the CC mintmark on the reverse and I will always display it with the reverse showing. In fact, if I get it slabbed, I will ask that they slab it so the front of the slab and the reverse of the coin are on the same side. Hear that ANACS, I am coming to you. I hope you enjoy this medal, I am very pleased with it, and happy to have #456/3000 for my collection.

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25 Mar 2019

A Fitting Tribute

Exonumia | Mokester

My most recent acquisition is a medal designed and executed by Laura Gardin Fraser, one of the true Titans of medallic art. This particular medal was commissioned to honor the 200th Anniversary of the birth of George Washington. The Obverse of the medal shows a left facing bust of General Washington in military uniform with his name WASHINGTON above the bust and the dates 1732 and 1932 on each side of the Washington Family Crest. "Laura Gardin Fraser Sculptor" is inscribed directly below Washington's bust. The Reverse shows Liberty holding a Torch in her Right Hand and a Sword in her Left Hand with an Eagle perched on a Column behind her, Proclaim Liberty Throughout All The Land is inscribed on either side of Miss Liberty. This medal is the 76MM bronze presentation version, the Mint later released a 58MM version for sale to collectors. Much more detail about this medal is available by viewing the NGC Custom Set by our friend and colleague coinsbygary. Please visit his site as he has an extensive collection of Laura Gardin Fraser material that he very skillfully presents for all to admire. https://coins.www.collectors-society.com/wcm/CoinView.aspx?sc=438675PS- My medal is noticeably darker on the obverse than the reverse, probably the result of past display that featured the obverse and thus protected the reverse.

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26 Nov 2018

My Latest Acquisition

Exonumia | Mokester

I am that guy!!! I like to buy the club coffee mug, I love to wear the club polo shirt, and I love to have other keepsakes associated with my coin club. The club that I am primarily involved with is the Western Pennsylvania Numismatic Society (WPNS). We meet the first Tuesday of every month at the Mt. Lebanon Methodist Church and we are a friendly and learned bunch of local collectors. I have only been a member since September (you must attend three meetings to be considered for membership) but started attending meetings in June of this year.

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