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user_32035's Blog

05 Sep 2017

1863 2 cent coin, (This is not a real prototype)

Odd & Curious Money | user_32035

Can anyone help me out in identifying this coin???  It is a 1863 2 cent coin.  Been to three different coin dealers and no one can tell me much about it.  If you can help me I would appreciate it greatly.  It is 1.5 inches wide.  Copper plated with some type of alloy that is unknown.  Weight is .94 oz. or 26.4 grams.  It is too heavy to be aluminum.  It is a mold or some type of stamped coin.    I can email anyone more pictures if needed or for the curious ones.   I'm new at this so please bare with me at posting my first time..

Thanks
Laurel

Comments

Kepi

Level 6

Not sure what this is, however alot of people here seem to think it's a souvenir of some kind.

CoinLady

Level 6

I think it's some kind of token or souvenir, not a real coin.

user_7180

Level 5

Looks like a conversation piece, but not a real coin.

Mike

Level 7

All of what is said is true. However why is it worn so much. That the measurements the fact that we is gone all points to more than a pattern a souvenir or anything else. Whatever it is was in circulation or made to look that way. I tried other things I still come up with what I originally said. Mike

user_32035

Level 2

You are right on all points, but it is still a puzzle I have to solve. If it was you Mike what would you do with it?

user_9073

Level 5

It is over-sized and over-weight for a two-cent piece. It looks plated. I think it might just be a curiosity souvenir. Like those giant coaster-sized replicas sold in stores like Cracker Barrel.

user_32035

Level 2

I also think the same as you but no one seems to have seen one or knows anything about it or the maker.

Conan Barbarian

Level 5

sorry cant help but lots of luck on finding its identity

user_32035

Level 2

I'll keep looking until someone or myself comes up with a real good answer for me.

Judd's book of U.S. Patterns lists specimens struck in bronze for 1863 (Judd numbers J-315 and J-316). However, the coin photographed does have "issues." The rim looks very crude which is a red flag. The fact that it appears very well circulated is another. if its legit. I believe it would have been discovered by now, but who knows. If you are a gambler throw a few bucks at NGC or PCGS. Good luck.

user_32035

Level 2

Yes, the coin does have some red flags peeling of the copper, weighs to much, and is to wide. But still is a interesting piece don't you think.

ZanzibarCoins

Level 4

Based on the photo, which on my end is a little blurry, :), it looks like it might be an 1883, but then, I can't really tell. Try using a magnifying glass to find out and you might be able to get more answers. (And, if it is a 1863, and they weren't minted until 1864 and it's not a counterfeit.........who knows, you may have a rare pattern/test coin!!!) Good luck!!!!! 15398 :)

user_32035

Level 2

Sorry about the pictures will post some better ones. Just purchased a better camera for close ups. Will post in the next day or so. Thanks'

Mike

Level 7

Actually according to the Red Book which you need. This two cent piece is .950 copper .050 tin and zink. It's 23 mm.In Diameter. And it weighs 6.22 grams. It a also the first coin to have In God We Trust. It wasn't minted till 1864. And was designed by James B. Longacre. I don't know what you have but those stats are from the book. Probably a counterfeit. Either your scale is off or these dealers did not want to tell you. Sorry Mike.

user_32035

Level 2

Only paid about 1 or 2 dollars for the piece. I know what you are saying about earlier about it be worn and too wide and all that. That part I did know. I also found that about 13 prototypes were made and only three made it. I really don't think it is a real deal but someone went through a lot of trouble to make a nice souvenir if that is what it is. I would think if it was a souvenir more of them would be out there and someone else should have run across it. I'm stumped. thanks for the info.

user_32035

Level 2

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