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Big Nub Numismatics's Blog

13 Jan 2021

April 4th, 1949

| Big Nub Numismatics

World War Two showed the globe how a failure to mend relations after war and harsh reparations that are unjustified can lead to even greater conflicts in the future. The League of Nations was formed after World War One in an attempt to ally Europe, North America, and Russia in order to prevent further complications and reconstruct after such a terrible war. The LoN, however, was weak. Without the US's involvement (even though it was Wilson's 14th point in his 14-point-plan) and the organization lacking powers to really intervene and international scuffles, small conflicts could turn into expansive wars. Germany's Third Reich took advantage of this and simply did not follow any restrictions placed on them by the LoN and the Treaty of Versailles. When the LoN finally came to their senses, avoiding war was impossible. Fast forward to the end of WWII, the end of FDR, and the beginning of the Truman administration, and a world recovering from the deadliest conflict in history. April 4th, 1949 was the beginning of the international world we see today, and the basis for the modern world. The US, along with 11 European powers signed an incredible act that, so far, has stopped any further large-scale wars from occurring (although the cold-war nearly brought an end to all). NATO is still around, and continues to help aid countries around the world.Again, this medal and its inception seems lost to history. A few have been sold in the past, but apart from that, we only have speculation and measurements. This is a copper-heavy alloy of bronze weighing 34 grams with the diameter that is equal to that of a Morgan Dollar's round plastic holder (approximately 40mm). This medal was struck as a commemorative piece for the NATO treaty signing, and I hypothesize it was commissioned for the 50th anniversary in 1999. The reverse of the medal gives a broad historical look at the treaty, and the obverse features the world leaders, including Truman, signing the NATO pact. It has a proof cameo finish making pictures difficult to take, but I managed to capture a few.This medal does well to both look well, and provide a small history lesson (Although if it could also state who/what/when/ and where it was struck that would have been nice :) After having this medal, I believe the US mint should begin striking circulating coins like this. Educate the public on past happenings, and provide a new wave of collectors. That's all for now, hope you enoyed!

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06 Jan 2021

A Major Club

| Big Nub Numismatics

Over the next few weeks, I will be posting blogs on my small medal collection. I was given this medal in a grab bag from the annual YN auction a few years ago. I loved the design from the medal, but until this point, I didn't know much about the medal itself. Sorry for the pictures' rotation. I can't seem to figure out how to fix it.This medal is made of bronze and created by the medallic Art company of New York, a prestigious medal striking company that has made plenty of beautiful medals, many of which we are very familiar with. It is 45mm and was commissioned by the Wichita Coin club to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the club's inception in 1966. The obverse shows past, and first, club president Lewis M. Raegan who was also an ANA Secretary. He was the workhorse of the organization during the late 40s putting in over 60 hours of work a week! The reverse just shows some Kansas staples including wheat, a Boeing jet, and the map of Kansas. The rest of the information I had to do some deep searching for, as nothing is widely available on this medal or coin club anymore!This medal seems quite common, I have two, and I have seen several up for sale on eBay and other platforms. Nor is this medal worth a large sum of money. Although the donors for the ANA are extremely generous, I don' think anyone would would slip two rare medals to an unsuspecting YN. The medals on eBay are around $20. The medal weighs approximately 45.4 grams (just about 150% the weight of a Morgan) and comes in a small cream-colored box with cotton fibers to protect the medal. Being, bronze, the medal is highly reactive to any moisture. I keep mine in an old Cuban cigar box (These boxes are often made to be naturally moisture regulating to keep cigars fresh so I thought this would make a nice wooden case for all of my medals). Whoever had it the previous 50+ years also kept it in a perfect environment, as no spots can be seen at all on either of the medals.I've seen one graded MS-68 by NGC, but NGC has no further information on this medal.I spent the better part of three hours tracking down any information I had on this medal, weighing it myself, browsing through NNP, and past Numismatists articles, but no luck. I couldn't even find more information on the Medallic Art company. I'll be looking in the future, and I'll let everyone know what I find!

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