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Well worn Copper's Blog

30 Apr 2021

"Treasure in The Cellar" Book

| Well worn Copper

Found this during a search of coin books and had to have it. It's about two boys who found a bunch of gold coins while playing in a basement of an old house back in 1934. It goes into detail about what happened to the kids and their fight to legally claim the coins, as well as the claims of others, such as previous owners and tenants. Finding a cache of gold coins was every kids dream, it seems, although I'm 59 and I still dream it. Leonard Augsburger is the author and it was published (paperback) by the Maryland Historical Society in 2008.

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26 Apr 2021

Regrets? I've Had a Few. A Story of Seller's Remorse.

| Well worn Copper

Did you ever have something in your collection that you sold for whatever reason, only to live to regret it? Well, this is my story. Years ago I happened to come into a pair of plaster models for Skylab medals which were issued by Medallic Art Company back in the early 1980's. They were on eBay (don't ask me how I found them, I don't remember) and I bought the pair for about $60. After keeping them out of the way and up in the closet, I sold them, mainly because I was afraid they'd start to crumble or accidentally break (they were plaster after all). Since then I realized I'd probably never come across original plasters ever again, and now regret selling them. The real interest was how they were a part of the medal making process. Believe it or not, it took a while to find a buyer for them. I even put them in a exonumia auction but they failed to get any bids. The lesson here is: sometimes the oddest stuff in your collection is also the coolest. If anyone else out there has regrets, or stories of seller's remorse, feel free to share. After all, misery loves company.

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11 Apr 2021

Early Examples U.S. Coinage in Mint State: How Did They End Up Here?

| Well worn Copper

One part of American coin collecting that has always intrigued me concerns the existence of early examples of U.S. coinage which have somehow survived in mint state. By "early examples" I am talking about anything pre-1825. When you consider that coin collecting did not really get started in this country until the 1850's, with the elimination of the large cent, it amazes me that somehow certain coins were never used in commerce. "Workingman coins", such as dimes, quarters, and half dollars, were a considerable part of everyday commerce, and not sheltered or put aside like larger denominations such as silver dollars and gold coinage often were. So if collectors were few, who or how did these coins be put aside to remain in their mint state? Surely not every mint-state coin rested in the bottom of a mint sewn bag that somehow found it's way in the back of a deep bank vault, to lie undisturbed for decades (and roll collecting didn't come on the scene until the 1960's.) When you consider these examples survived the Hard Times era of the 1830's, when pocket change was scarce, it becomes even more fascinating. Although there were early collectors out there such as Joseph Mickley, they surely couldn't put everything aside. I recently purchased a 1806 Draped Bust half dollar in EF condition. The thought that it eventually found it's way into my collection simply because someone put it aside because it "looked pretty" over 200 years ago, instead of using it for the purchase of essentials in a hard scrabbled economy, always amazes me. Such things beg for answers. And I guess that's' why I'm pleasantly hooked.

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