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23 Sep 2020

The Fifty States of Coinage- Part 10- Georgia

Coins-United States | coinfodder

The Devil went down to Georgia.
He was lookin' for a soul to steal.
He was in a bind 'cause he was way behind.
He was willing to make a deal
When he came across this young man sawin' on a fiddle and playin' it hot.
And the Devil jumped upon a hickory stump and said "Boy, let me tell you what."


"I bet you didn't know it, but I'm a fiddle player, too.
And if you'd care to take a dare I'll make a bet with you.
Now you play a pretty good fiddle, boy, but give the Devil his due.
I'll bet a fiddle of gold against your soul 'cause I think I'm better than you."


Hello folks! And today, we are home, in the Peach State.

Georgia was one of the original 13 colonies, founded by James Oglethorpe and his trustees in 1732, naming their new colony after the current King of England. After years of protesting by the Malcontents (the pro-rum and slavery), Georgia became a royal colony. As the poorest of the 13 colonies, Georgia is considered by many to have the smallest role in the American Revolution. After this, Georgia became the fourth state in 1788. In 1829, Georgia became home to the second gold rush, and the first major, in the United States. During the Civil War, the city (and future capital) Atlanta became the crossroads of Sherman's Atlanta Campaign, which lead to the capture of Atlanta and the devastating March to the Sea. After the destruction of Atlanta, the state rebuilt to become the commercial crossroads of the reborn South. During WWII, the City of Savannah became the headquarters of the Mighty 8th Army Air Corp, the number one American Bomber group bombing Germany. During the 1950's and 60's, the State became a crossroads of the US Civil Rights Movement.

Today, Georgia remains the commercial crossroads of the South. Georgia is known for its tourism and history, plus the hospitality that has come to define the deep South. Famous citizens include Jimmy Carter, Martin Luther King Jr., Carl Vinson, Ray Charles, Ty Cobb, and Lucius Clay, leader of the Berlin Airlift.

To the coins, now.

Georgia's 50 State Quarter and ATB Quarter were released in 1999 and 2018, respectively. On the Fifty State Quarter, is several items representing the state. On it are the Georgia Peach, the motto (Wisdom, Justice, Moderation), and two branches from the live oak, the state tree. The ATB coin commerates Cumberland Island, one of only two natural NPS-owned sites in Georgia, famous for the wild horses. However, a typical pattern with the Treasury, the coin's design came out rather a disappointment. On it, is two Herons, standing in the marsh. No horses. Are you kidding?!?!

In 1925, Stone Mountain was still a granite outcropping that still hadn't become a point of protests. So, to honor the Confederate Soldier, the Stone Mountain Confederate Monumental Association decided to hire someone to carve the face of Stone Mountain. They picked the future sculptor of Mount Rushmore, Gutzon Borglum. Gutzon had envisioned a MASSIVE monument (not helped by the fact he was a KKK member) honoring the Confederates, but a series of scuffles with the SMCMA had Borglum leaving in anger. Augustus Lukewarm was chosen to finish the face, and that was completed in 1970. To help fund the carving, in 1925 the SMCMA asked for, and received a commemorative half dollar. The coin was created by Borglum. On the front was Borglum's proposed design of the bas-relief sculpture. On the back, next to an eagle, is the words "MEMORIAL TO THE VALOR OF THE SOLDIER OF THE SOUTH.". In today's climate, this coin would probably not make it past congress.

Remember how I mentioned Templeton Reid in my blog on California? Well, this is where he got his start. Templeton Reid was a Georgian who used gold in his private mint during the Georgia Gold Rush in 1829. He made rather bland pieces. Then, it was revealed that Templeton Reid's gold contained only a FRACTION of the gold he claimed was in his coins. Branded a fraud, he left Georgia. If you would like to collect one of these today, good luck. Less than 30 specimens exist today of any type of his coins, Georgia or California. So, if your name isn't Jeff or Bill, you probably won't get one in your lifetime.

During the height of the GA Gold Rush, the US Mint, foddering as it was back in the days before the California Gold Rush, was desperate to build a mint in Georgia to get hands on some gold to coin. TheMint Act of 1835ordered the creation of three new mints- New Orleans, for silver and gold, and Charlotte and Dahlonega for gold only. The Dahlonega Mint began production in 1838 after spending over 30 grand on construction (in 1835's money). The mint created only gold coins, more specially $1, Quarter Eagles, $3.00 (1854 only), and half eagles. In 1861, the mint was seized by the Confederates, who would strike an unknown number of gold coins. After the war, the US Treasury declined to reopen the mint, ending the saga of the Dahlonega Mint. The mint used a mintmark of D.

Thanks for reading about my home! And later, we will be continuing along our road trip of the US of A.



Comments

user_9073

Level 5

I think you mean Augustus Lukeman. Not Augustus Lukewarm.

coinfodder

Level 5

Hmmmm..,.

coinsbygary

Level 5

I visited Stone Mountain with an evangelistic drama team I was traveling with. During the day we climbed to the top of the mountain. At night we watched a laser light show choreographed to music on the face of the mountain. The show was really cool!

Longstrider

Level 6

You are putting out a fantastic series of blogs. Who doesn't love that song. Everybody was playing it in their head as they were reading the lyrics. Dahlonega gold is the best. ___Thanks.

Kepi

Level 6

Great blog! Really fun...Love the song! ; )

TheNumisMaster

Level 5

Nice info, and a GREAT song to go along with it! Love the post, keep it up!

Mike

Level 7

I have to say I love that song!! But the blog better. I enjoyed this one great research and history. That gets me all the time. I will read it again. Question? Does the Devil still live there. Great.I appreciate a good blog. It shows your interest in the hobby.

coinfodder

Level 5

Yes, the devil is still in Georgia, somewhere. I would say around Thomasville. 🤣

"SUN"

Level 5

Nice way to cover the Georgia coins

Stumpy

Level 5

Yea to all you folks out there Chilton County Alabama sells a ton of "Georgia Peaches", just ask Bama. I have the 1925 Commemorative Stone Mountain Coin, it is pretty, but as coinfodder says it wouldn't pass congress today. And having lived near Marietta once, it is realistically now a part of Atlanta. Thanks again for the great Blog! Later!

I still think Florida has the best peaches. I would love to own a piece minted in Dahlonega, they struck some great pieces.

coinfodder

Level 5

You think Florida has the best peaches?! Here's a gem- Georgia Peaches, proudly grown in South Carolina.

Mokie

Level 6

You are doing an excellent job highlighting the numismatic history of each of the States. Keep it up, really enjoying it.

Mike

Level 7

Thanks my son collected the only the silver proof. MS 69. Impairment he said they will be would be worth more he was right. One more.to go next year that's it. I thought that the reverse was very nice on all of them. That was great. For my son. Good blog thanks.

Golfer

Level 5

I lived in Atlanta Georgia for a summer. Worked at Cherokee Country Club for the summer. Love the Stone Mountain commemorative. That gold coin look's like a keeper. Would like to have one of those gold coins.

I. R. Bama

Level 5

Thanks for the blog. Where in Georgia are you?

coinfodder

Level 5

I am near Atlanta, in Marietta. I live within 20 minutes of the Convention Hall where the 2020 NMS was.

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